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New Cannondale SuperSix EVO spotted at Criterium du Dauphine

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Is this the new Cannondale SuperSix EVO?

Is this the new Cannondale SuperSix EVO? (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The deep head tube likely improves aerodynamics and allows hydraulic brake hoses to be routed internally

The deep head tube likely improves aerodynamics and allows hydraulic brake hoses to be routed internally (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The frameset has lowered seat stays and more aerodynamic tubing profiles than the current model

The frameset has lowered seat stays and more aerodynamic tubing profiles than the current model (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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Michael Woods and Tejay van Garderen started stage 1 of the Dauphine on the new bikes

Michael Woods and Tejay van Garderen started stage 1 of the Dauphine on the new bikes (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The new frameset features several design updates

The new frameset features several design updates (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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A look at the underside of the bottom bracket on the new bike

A look at the underside of the bottom bracket on the new bike (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The rear brake cable is neatly routed into the top tube of the frame

The rear brake cable is neatly routed into the top tube of the frame (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The rim brake version of the frameset uses direct mount calipers front and rear

The rim brake version of the frameset uses direct mount calipers front and rear (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The fork crown hugged into the down tube, presumably for improved aerodynamics

The fork crown hugged into the down tube, presumably for improved aerodynamics (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The frame features neat internal cable routing

The frame features neat internal cable routing (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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The bike looks to be paired with a proprietary D-profile seat post

The bike looks to be paired with a proprietary D-profile seat post (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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Three bottle cage bosses are on the down tube of the frame, offering improved aerodynamics

Three bottle cage bosses are on the down tube of the frame, offering improved aerodynamics (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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A Di2 interface port looks to be located at the head of the down tube

A Di2 interface port looks to be located at the head of the down tube (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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Simon Clarke had the disc version of the SuperSix EVO on the team car as his spare bike

Simon Clarke had the disc version of the SuperSix EVO on the team car as his spare bike (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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Some of the framesets seen had been given a primer paint coat, presumably to hide the design while others were team issue

Some of the framesets seen had been given a primer paint coat, presumably to hide the design while others were team issue (Image credit: Josh Evans)
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SuperSix EVO decals featured on the top tube of the team issue framesets

SuperSix EVO decals featured on the top tube of the team issue framesets (Image credit: Josh Evans)

An all-new Cannondale SuperSix EVO has been spotted at the Criterium du Dauphine. The brand new frameset is being ridden at the race by EF Education First riders Michael Woods, Simon Clarke and Tejay van Garderen, with spare rim and disc brake versions of the bike also seen on the team cars.

The new frameset features lowered seat stays, a proprietary D-profile seat post and aerodynamic tube profiles throughout the frameset. The rim brake version of the frameset features direct mount brakes front and rear and a spare disc brake version of the bike was at the start of stage 1 of the race in Aurillac, France.

On the UCI’s approved frame and fork list, Cannondale registered the SuperSix EVO 3, SuperSix EVO 3 Disc and respective forks in October 2018. The company also registered CAAD13 and CAAD13 Disc framesets in February this year, which have also not yet been released.

The new frameset follows a similar design from the BMC Teammachine and Specialized Tarmac framesets with lowered seat stays improving both compliance and aerodynamics. The frameset features full internal routing for brake cables and Shimano Di2 wires and a Di2 interface port appears to be located at the head of the down tube.

The forks on the SuperSix EVO feature a shoulder that slots into the down tube of the frame, presumably for improved aerodynamics, while the head tube protrudes ahead of the fork steerer giving the frame a deeper head tube section.

On the disc brake version of the frame, it appears the hydraulic brake hoses enter the top of the protruding head tube section for a cleaner front end design.

Some of the framesets seen appeared to have been given primer paint coats to conceal the new design, however, both Woods and van Garderen’s race bikes were in team livery and featured SuperSix EVO decals on the top tube.

There are three bottle mount bosses on the down tube of the frame, which has been seen in other frame designs and allows for a bottle cage to be positioned lower on the down tube to improve aerodynamics.

The new D-profile seat post is now seen on numerous professional-level race bikes and is often frame-specific. Simon Clarke’s disc brake version of the new Cannondale SuperSix EVO featured a decal to the rear of the post with the model name Hollowgram SL, a model name used on Cannondale’s crank arms.

The Criterium du Dauphine has always been a hotbed for new tech with the race offering teams, mechanics and riders a final race test before the Tour de France next month where big brands often launch products at the biggest race in the world. In recent years, Trek and Specialized have debuted the new Emonda, Madone, Venge and Tarmac framesets at the race.

Click through the gallery above for a closer look at what could be the new Cannondale SuperSix EVO and SuperSix EVO Disc.