Best cycling overshoes 2024 - Keep your feet warm and dry during the winter months

It's probably safe to say most cyclists reach for their overshoes when cycling in wet and cold weather to help keep their feet dry and warm. 

The best cycling shoes by design aren't particularly well insulated. Throw in low temperatures, wind chill and road spray or rain and it's easy to understand how you can end up with cold or even freezing feet while cycling in winter. If it's a longer ride and you get things wrong you could even end up damaging your feet. 

There is a really broad range of overshoes on the market which can be split into lots of different subcategories. Different riders will need different things but we've got most bases covered here and there are clear explanations on which overshoes are suited for the best job. Whether you are looking for one pair to get you through the whole winter or additional pairs for more specific conditions or riding. If you've had frozen feet on the bike before I'm willing to bet you remember it well. Overshoes will add an extra layer of insulation against the freezing wind and will also prevent rain and water from entering which will also slowly freeze your feet.

There can be some really fine differences between different models that are all designed with certain temperatures or weather conditions in mind. You can also try a set of winter cycling shoes to further insulate your feet or to pair with overshoes for maximum protection. 

If you are shopping for your first pair, this guide should offer some useful advice. There's also more information that I didn't have room for here at the bottom of the page so head there for more advice and tips.

Best cycling overshoes: Quick list

Heavy duty layering system

Spatz Pro Stealth

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

1. Spatz Pro Stealth

Heavy duty overshoe layering system

Specifications

Temperature range: Recommended full system below 3C /
Weight (per pair): 346 grams total system.
Material : Neoprene / Covered neoprene

Reasons to buy

+
Great winter protection 
+
Tighter, sleeker fit 
+
Two-in-one system adds value and versatility

Reasons to avoid

-
Tighter fit does take longer to get on 

The Spatz Pro Stealth overshoe system is the latest offering to be offered from Spatz, the British brand that specialises in foul weather kit whose overshoes have been leading the charge in overshoe performance for the last several years. 

The Pro Stealth is an overshoe system that includes a set of sturdy neoprene toe covers which weigh 75 grams and can be worn under the main overshoes. This adds an extra layer of warmth and protection but means they can also be worn on their own as well, or the overshoes can be used without them on less grim days. They are tight-fitting and offer a good level of protection. Despite their appearance they are also very easy to pull on. 

The overshoes themselves have been refined, being slightly lighter than the similar Spatz Pro II which we also rated highly. They are a little bit thinner and use covered neoprene fabric across a lot of the foot area which should minimise nicks and tears which has been something to watch for on previous Spatz Iterations. 

The fit has also been firmed up and everything sits tightly in place, the toe cover/overshoe fit area is snug thanks to silicone grippers and I think this will help minimise underfoot water ingress. There's still the fleecy inner lining and discreet Spatz Logos on the midfoot and calf. 

If you are looking for a heavy-duty, winter overshoe that can deal with pretty much anything look this way. You won't be disappointed

To read more about why they are worthy of the coveted five-star rating, check out our Spatz Pro 2 overshoes review. We've also reviewed the Spatz Roadman 2 and Legalz Pro overshoes, which also garnered five-star ratings.

Fast winter protection

Spatz Fasta

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

2. Spatz Fasta

A lighter weight Spatz option

Specifications

Temperature range: N/A
Weight: 181 grams
Material : Neoprene / Coated neoprene

Reasons to buy

+
Still provide great protection but in a sleeker lighter package 
+
Stylish design

Reasons to avoid

-
Take a touch longer to get on 

The Fasta Oveshoe from Spatz is also a new model for Winter 2023/24. If you are familiar with the Legalz model from Spatz the Fasta represents a slightly lighter weight, more fitted and aero, one-piece overshoe that just brings a bit less bulk whilst still offering great protection.

The Fasta isn't as high cut as the Pro II or Pro Stealth but is similar to the Legalz and feels a little bit lighter when you're wearing it. I've worn it on cold chaingang rides and it's been just the ticket. 

It's also a one-piece pull-on design meaning there is now no velcro strap to close underneath. The downside to this means they're certainly not 'fasta' to put on in the morning, but they're still easier than Velotoze. 

Spatz also says the overshoes should provide a smoother transition with bib tights or legwarmers thanks to being a bit thinner at the top. They are burly enough to put up with some pretty grim weather though if you don't need full-blown four or five-hour deep winter ride protection or tend to press on a bit the Fasta may be what you need. 

Wet weather protection

GripGrab Aquashield

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

3. GripGrab Aquashield Shoe Covers

Lightweight, wet weather protection

Specifications

Temperature range: N/A
Weight: 96g
Material : 85% Polyester 10% Elastane 5% Polyurethane

Reasons to buy

+
Sleek, lightweight fit 
+
Add a good amount of lower leg protection

Reasons to avoid

-
Thinner, non neoprene design may mean your feet get cold and wet eventually 

The GripGrab Aquashield Shoe Covers are a well-thought-out lightweight, wet-weather option if you're looking for something that offers good resistance to rain and road spray without adding lots of weight or bulk. 

Their design and fit are different to most of the other overshoes in the guide. The Aqua shields are tall overshoes that are probably only around a centimetre or two shorter than the Spatz Pro Stealth they are however specifically designed to sit under your tights or leg warmers which is meant to minimise the amount of water running down your legs and directly into your shoes. The picture above is to show you what they look like. 

You can of course wear the majority of overshoes this way if you want to, but in my experience, nearly all cyclists wear them over tights or warmers. An interesting point if you're trying to minimise water ingress into your shoes.

I wore them on a very wet day recently and a standout was the feeling you get as your lower legs and shins start to slowly get soaked was eliminated by having them sitting under my bib tights, it was also quite a nice sensation as the soft fleece lining is comfortable against your skin.

Overall they are going to be suited to shorter or harder wet rides or efforts where you still generate some heat. The bottoms are fairly open (for road cleats only) and I think if you were out for hours in the rain in them you would end up with wet and possibly still cold feet. You need the bulk of a heavier neoprene option to stay wet but warm for hours. But in the wet or on days when there's lots of spray, they are a good option and don't break the bank. 

Budget neoprene option

Endura Road overshoe Hi viz

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

4. Endura Road Overshoe - Hi Viz Yellow

High visibility on a budget

Specifications

Temperature range : Down to freezing
Weight: 165g
Material : Neoprene 90% / Nylon 10%

Reasons to buy

+
Hi-Viz always helps
+
Good value

Reasons to avoid

-
Softer neoprene seems prone to tearing
-
Ankle not the tallest

The simply named Endura Road Overshoe in Hi-Viz Yellow is another competitively priced neoprene option, one that has been a cornerstone of the Endura overshoe line for years. 

The main body of the overshoes features soft neoprene and the Hi-viz fluoro sections stand out, there is also a reflective strip on either side of the zip to help you stand out in the gloom and dark. There is a black version, but the Hi-Viz is nice in the winter gloom. The aramid stitching around the neoprene underside of the overshoe feels really durable and solid and I was drawn to this feature. 

The Road Overshoes keep your feet warm and dry for long periods, they fit snugly around your shoe and the durable lower sections around the cleat opening feel solid. The offset zip makes getting them on really quick. However, if you like your overshoes to extend a little higher up the leg perhaps look elsewhere as the Enduras aren't the tallest. I also managed to put a nick in one quite easily with a fingernail taking them off, so this is something to look out for. If you are looking for an affordable, good-quality overshoe to deal with wet or just cold conditions, the road overshoes are a really solid buy. 

You can read our in-depth review of the Endura road overshoes here 

Aero and waterproof

Velotoze Road 2.0 winter overshoes

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

5. Velotoze Road 2.0

Light, cheap and pretty much waterproof

Specifications

Temperature range: 5-16C / 40-60F
Weight: 121g
Material: Latex

Reasons to buy

+
Aerodynamic
+
Fully waterproof material
+
Useful option for time trials and racing 

Reasons to avoid

-
Not breathable at all
-
Take longer to get on

Velotoze offers a simple, yet very effective solution for waterproofing. By creating a full latex membrane that encases the shoe tightly like a swim cap. The solution to this was the Velotoze Road 2.0, which offers reinforcement at the bottom and around the toe to add durability.

The sealing of the Velotoze is actually amongst the best in the guide. The fit is so tight it's very hard for water to penetrate. As a result of this though and all latex construction breathability is reduced, so you will find your feet damp and a bit sweaty after after use. This is to be expected though and the wet but warm effect is in full effect here. 

If you're looking for a super warm overshoe, the Velotoze isn't a quick fix for this, but they will keep large amounts of water at bay, and if and when moisture seeps in your feet will be wet but warm. The Road 2.0 units were a lot easier to put on than the originals which I also owned which made life easier. They are also a hugely popular choice for racers and time triallists thanks to their aerodynamic fit. 

If you riding or racing hard in foul conditions the Velotoze are cheap and can be really useful to improve aerodynamics or keep spray and water at bay. 

Take a look at our in-depth review of the Velotoze Road 2.0 overshoes.

Neoprene toe covers

Le Col neoprene toe warmers

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)
Toe warmth and protection in milder temperatures

Specifications

Temperature Range : Approx 8C and up
Weight: 57g
Material : Neoprene

Reasons to buy

+
Offer good warmth on shorter, milder rides
+
Soft internal finish 
+
Offer good warmth to toes 

Reasons to avoid

-
Rear of shoes will catch some spray 

The Le Col neoprene toe warmers are aimed at insulating your feet in milder conditions when you don't need or want a full overshoe. 

They are made from neoprene with a soft brushed fleecy interior and are around 3mm thick. They slip on easily and look stylish with the simple white Le Col logo. I liked using them in milder temperatures when the roads are relatively dry or perhaps a little damp. For a small investment, they fill a potential wardrobe gap, providing a nice transition from road shoes into full winter overshoes. They do a really good job of keeping your toes warm and I felt glad for the extra protection from the spray and wind. If you're heading out for efforts or a hard session they will keep you warm and protect the front of your shoes without adding the bulk of a full overshoe. 

I did notice some light scuffing to the underside front panel of the overshoe on my clipping-in foot after just a few rides so watch out for this when clipping in and out or stopping, as the section is not reinforced, I fear it would wear through relatively quickly if you were hard on it so be careful when walking in them. 

If it's still mild but raining or wet it would be better to opt for a full overshoe or the Velotoze overshoes that are featured further down the page, but for transitioning into the colder weather, these Le Col toe covers are brilliant.

You can find our in-depth review of the Le Col Toe cover here.

Deep winter neoprene

BBB Ultrawear

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

7. BBB Ultrawear Zipperless

Heavy duty neoprene protection

Specifications

Temperature range : 0 - 5 °C
Weight : 185g
Material : Neoprene

Reasons to buy

+
Good mid calf height
+
Thick neoprene construction 
+
Reinforced toes and heels 

Reasons to avoid

-
More open underside may aid water ingress

The UltraWear Zipperless overshoes from BBB are another pair of heavy-duty neoprene overshoes that extend up to around mid-calf height. If you want a thick pair of neoprene overshoes to tackle a range of riding these will fit the bill. 

What I like about them is the combination of the fit and cut combined with the heavier-duty protection. You get thick neoprene, reinforced toe and heel sections and a nice mid-calf height. But the overshoes still have a nice close-fitting cut and look stylish. I'm not a big fan of baggy, wrinkly overshoes. 

You need to pull the overshoes on before your shoes and they do up underneath with a velcro flap. The sole openings are fairly large and I think you could use these off-road with MTB shoes too as long as you minimise the walking. BBB rates them as suitable for between 0 and 5 degrees but you could of course use them over a much wider temperature range.

There's also a small loop on the heel to allow the fitting of a small clip-on light, something unique within the overshoes in this guide. 

Lightweight style

Nalini B0W shoe cover

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

8. Nalini B0W Winter shoe cover

Lightweight, fleecy warmth

Specifications

Temperature range: Approx down to freezing
Weight: 95 grams
Material : Polyester, Polyamide, Elastane

Reasons to buy

+
Stylish with minimal bulk 
+
Warm fleece interior 
+
Well fitting 

Reasons to avoid

-
Bottom may succumb quickly to lots of rain and spray 

The Nalini B0W overshoes are lighter-weight, fleece-lined overshoes that don't add too much bulk at under 100 grams for the pair. But add a surprising amount of snugness I've found this winter. 

If you are interested in some less bulky overshoes for dry, colder days or for shorter more intense riding in anything but very wet conditions they are a nice overshoe option. 

They have a wide elastic gripper at the top to ensure they stay in place, a large reflective tab on the rear of the heel and a YKK-sealed waterproof zipper. They were probably my go-to pair of milder weather overshoes this winter and I really liked the fit and style. 

The overshoes are made in Italy by Nalini and construction seems quality with no defects at all. The reinforced toe section is also still looking pristine. 

Also tested

Galibier arctic 3 overshoes

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

9. Galibier Arctic 3 overshoe

Affordable neoprene protection

Specifications

Temperature range : Down to freezing
Weight : 251g
Material : 84% Neoprene / 18% PU

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic value 
+
Moulded toe area should be very durable 
+
Rear reflective strips for visibility 

Reasons to avoid

-
Heel cutout position could be better 

Galibier produces good quality cycling kit that is great value for money. The Arctic 3 overshoes are hefty 4mm, affordable neoprene units and have a very interesting moulded rubber toe box for added durability. 

The cleat opening is wide enough to accommodate two-bolt-mount gravel or MTB shoes and the toe box may lend itself well to off-road use. The neoprene outer is not quite as soft as the Endura offerings below but still feels well-made. There is a gloss black Galibier logo on each side and 3M reflective stripes on either side of the zip to aid visibility. There is also a velcro closure at the top of the ankle to keep things in place. My only gripe would be that on my size large pair, the cutout for the shoe heel tab seemed a little off with the overshoe sitting over the heel tab itself, so you may want to size up if you have bulky or winter cycling shoes. But in use, this didn't cause me any issues. 

I used these overshoes during a really cold period in the UK, with plenty of riding in freezing conditions and was very surprised and impressed as the ride went on at how warm the moulded toe box kept my toes, the extra rubber in that area seemed to do a better job at keeping the cold at bay and blocking the wind. Galibier may well be onto something with this. For the money, the Arctic 3s are brilliant value and if you suffer from cold toes in particular, they may be worth a look.

You can read our in-depth review of the Endura Arctic 3 overshoes here 

Assos GT Ultraz winter overshoes

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

10. Assos GT Ultraz Winter booties

Stylish, dry, cold protection

Specifications

Termperature range : Down to freezing
Weight: 121g
Material : Outer: 100% Polyester / Inner: 65% Polyester / 35% Polyurethane

Reasons to buy

+
Premium design and styling 
+
Deceptively warm for the weight 
+
Super soft fleece inner 

Reasons to avoid

-
Top of overshoe cuff finishing could be cleaner

The Assos GT Ultraz winter overshoes are a premium, sleek and stylish offering that are relatively thin compared to some neoprene offerings.

Constructed mainly from Polyester, the overshoes have a soft fleece interior, strengthened toe area and what Assos call Zerocuff which is to ensure a slick unbulky transition from the top of the overshoe to your tights. They transition really neatly into tights and legwarmers and brought a few compliments on club runs when I was wearing them. 

I had reservations initially about how warm the overshoes would be considering their weight and thickness. But they kept my feet warm well down into single digits without feeling bulky which is something I like. I don't however think these are the best overshoes to use if you are doing a lot of riding in the wet, they have a DWR coating but water gets in relatively quickly with the overshoes becoming saturated. These will be the best option for dry, cold days. 

You can find our in-depth review of the Assos GT Ultraz Winter booties here

Castelli Entranta winter bibtights

(Image credit: Future / Tom Wieckowski)

11. Castelli Entranta shoe cover

Stylish protection for milder weather

Specifications

Temperature range: 4°C - 14°C / 39°F - 57°F
Weight: 124g
Material : Polyester, Polyamide, Elastane, Neoprene

Reasons to buy

+
Stylish 
+
Neoprene collar stays put 
+
Provide a good amount of warmth

Reasons to avoid

-
Toe protection area still a bit thin 

Sometimes I look out of the window at the heavy rain and decide to just stay inside and hop on the indoor trainer (when I don't have to go and test overshoes). No rule says we have to ride if we don't want to. 

If you prefer to miss the wet rides and just want a good-looking, warm overshoe for colder weather that will shrug off some water or spray then check out the Castelli Entranta. 

First off, like a lot of Castelli gear, the Entranta's are great-looking overshoes. They are soft and fitted with a lovely wide neoprene cuff, a red Castelli logo on the forefoot and a rubber ankle section to aid movement. They also extend a good few inches up the calf which aids the overall fit. 

The Entranta's use a soft fleece lining and have a reflective pull tab on the rear of the heel. I'd say they will keep your feet comfortable down to around 5 degrees and will shrug off light rain and spray. 

Sportful Fiandre overshoes

(Image credit: Future)

12. Sportful Fiandre Bootie

Great for fast and windy rides in the wet

Specifications

Temperature range : Approx 5C and up
Weight: 104g
Material : 100% Polyester

Reasons to buy

+
Wide elastic top cuff for aero fit and to keep water out 
+
Reflective logos to aid visibility 

Reasons to avoid

-
Not warm enough for the coldest days 

The Sportful Fiandre booties are constructed using the popular Gore-Tex Infinium fabric and are a thinner overshoe designed to offer excellent wind-blocking protection as well as water resistance in slightly warmer temperatures. 

If you're riding in foul weather conditions and want excellent wind and rain protection without the full bulk of a heavier-weight neoprene overshoe then the Fiandre is a solid option. The Gore-Tex Infinium material also offers good windproofing and breathability, I'd go for these for less wet, windy conditions for example and the GripGrab aqua shield overshoes for when there is more water.

The cuff extends a good way up the ankle and there's a nice wide elastic gripper to keep it firmly in place. I can't stand overshoes slipping down during a ride so this was welcome. The zip is moved to the side to keep it out of the way of spray and has a neoprene guard inside to prevent water from working its way in. I wore them on an autumn day when there was a lot of standing water from heavy rain and they were perfect at keeping the spray away without my feet overheating. 

Visually the Fiandre looks good and has a quality feel. With two reflective Sportful logos and a prominent red band across the left overshoe which matches the Fiandre bib tights well if you want to coordinate. the Fiandres cut a stylish figure when worn, I would like to see a slightly tighter fit overall as there is some wrinkling, but this is partly due to the nature of the Infinium fabric.

Take a look at our in-depth review of the Sportful Fiandre bootie overshoe.

How to choose

If you're shopping for your first pair of overshoes, try to spend at the top of your budget. Generally, you'll just end up with a better quality product. I'd recommend purchasing a heavier-duty set of overshoes first and filling that main wardrobe gap. They will serve you well across all conditions and it's better to have feet that are a little too warm than cold. Then if you want to add additional more specific pairs later on down the line you can. Any of the Spatz models or the BBB option would be a great place to start for this. 

Are overshoes waterproof

This is a key point for me. Lots of overshoes are marked as 'waterproof' but in reality, I'd argue no overshoe is 100% waterproof at the moment. If you are riding for a prolonged spell in rain or taking on a lot of road spray water will eventually find it's way in. A major culprit here is other riders' rear wheels, your own front wheel, or a badly-designed front mudguard/fender that catches the water from the rear wheel and funnels it outwards onto your feet. This is especially problematic if they are badly angled or on the shorter side. 

The key between having soaked, freezing feet or wet but warm-feeling feet is overshoe material and construction. A thicker neoprene overshoe should help keep your feet wet but warm if compromised by water which aids comfort. 

A thinner overshoe could potentially leave you with cold feet if it's soaked through and subject to hours of wind chill or rain. That's when things start feeling uncomfortable. 

If you're doing lots of longer-length rides in cold conditions, this point is important to consider. If you do mostly shorter, more intense road rides it's amazing how much heat you generate and how little kit you can get away with wearing. 

What else can I do to keep my feet warm?

We would also recommend fitting some of the best road bike mudguards to your bike which will help minimise road spray over your feet and protect your bike. They will keep a surprising amount of water away from your feet. 

Like the Spatz system here, layering toe warmers and overshoes also offers another way of adding another layer of protection over your toes which can be most susceptible to the cold.

You can also try winter cycling socks and some brands offer windproof, insulated socks which will also add warmth. Shoes that aren't super tight or on the small side will also help with circulation and air flow to keep your feet comfortable.

Finally, some warm-up balm or embrocation on your feet may provide a sensation of warmth that may help you feel a bit more comfortable. 

Are cycling overshoes worth it?

Yes, cycling overshoes are worth buying. Anything over around an hour on the bike in the cold and wet and there's a fair chance you will have soaking and cold feet. Yes, you can tough this out and ride for hours but we can promise it won't be comfortable and you'll be using energy trying to stay warm that could be used elsewhere. 

We've ridden for hours in winter with frozen feet and it's miserable. A pair of overshoes will protect your feet and keep them warmer and if water eventually does work its way in, you will be 'wet but warm' instead of frozen to the bone. Our advice is to invest in a set of neoprene overshoes first, put some time in with them on the bike and get an idea of what you like, and what you don't. 

Should I get overshoes or toe covers?

Just as you may not need full winter boots, full shoe covers might be too warm. Toe covers, as the name suggests, only cover the toe box of your shoe, ending just past the cleat, which helps to hold it in place. They tend to be fairly cheap but for the usually reasonable price can fill a useful gap in your wardrobe for spring and autumn cool conditions. 

Cycling overshoes, on the other hand, engulf your whole shoe and see a cuff that will continue up the calf, the length of which varies by brand and model. Of course, the further up the leg, the greater the protection against the elements, and with the additional coverage, it should come as no surprise that full overshoes are considerably warmer.

Read more in our overshoes vs winter boots feature.

How do you wear cycling overshoes?

As the name suggests, cycling overshoes are worn over your cycling shoes, and most pull on after you have put your shoes on. For some of the tighter options, you need to pull them onto your leg before you put your shoe on, and then pull the overshoe back down over the shoe. Most are on in seconds and are easy to get on with a bit of practice. 

Most cyclists will wear their overshoes on top of their bib tights or legwarmers but you can wear them underneath against your skin and some are even designed to be worn this way. This may prove a bit tricky with big bulky overshoes, but it means the water that soaks into the fabric of your tights doesn't then just seep downward into your shoes, but instead downward on the outside of the waterproof membrane. 

Hopefully it goes without saying, but if you are wearing winter overshoes, you should wear leg warmers or bib tights too, it's not very smart keeping your feet nice and warm and then bleeding body heat from your exposed legs and knees. The more heat you can retain the better; it will help you put all of your energy into pedalling the bike. 

What are the warmest cycling overshoes?

The thicker the shoe cover, the warmer it's going to be. An overshoe that also extends higher up your ankle and calf will really help promote warmth. One thing to keep in mind is how much of the bottom of your shoe it covers. 

Carbon is a terrible insulator which, combined with things like metal cleat screws, sap heat from your feet and leads to discomfort. Unfortunately, there needs to be holes in the bottom of your cycling overshoes to accommodate the cleat and heel pad, but in most cases the more of the sole that is covered, the warmer you will be.

Also, it's worth noting that thick neoprene overshoes can scuff against your cranks as you ride and the overshoe is likely to wear through more quickly. You should also stay on top of cleat and pedal wear as worn-out cleats and pedals can exacerbate this problem. 

How should cycling overshoes fit?

Cycling overshoes should have a snug fit, so as to keep the water and cold air out. If they're too loose, you could find them slipping and letting in all the elements. However, if they're too tight, that could spell other troubles. Check your shoe size against the size guide for overshoes, and that should give you a good starting point. Most cycling overshoes have enough stretch to accommodate your feet.

Another thing to consider is whether to opt for overshoes with zips or velcro straps. Wrestling shoe covers onto your feet can be a workout all on its own, but well-placed zippers can make the process considerably more manageable. 

Look for a pair of cycling overshoes that feature a pull tab built into the heel to simplify the process. Velcro straps at the top cuff can allow you to tighten up the opening and help to prolong protection against water ingress, but its effectiveness will eventually deteriorate.

How long do overshoes last?

Hopefully, years if you look after them. try not to walk around too much in your overshoes and rinse or wash them after wet, mucky rides and if the build quality is good, they should last several years.

Other overshoe reviews

You can trust Cyclingnews Our experts spend countless hours testing cycling tech and will always share honest, unbiased advice to help you choose. Find out more about how we test.

You can read our in-depth review of the Castelli Estremo overshoes here.

Associate Editor Josh Croxton rates the Specialized high cut neoprene shoe covers, and praised them in this feature of cycling tech we love

We also tested the dhb extreme weather overshoes this winter but found the fit to be poor.

Tom Wieckowski
Tech writer

Tom joined the Cyclingnews team in late 2022 as tech writer. Tom has over 10 years experience as a qualified mechanic with 5 or so of those being spent running an independent workshop. Tom has ridden and raced bikes from an early age up to a national level on the road and track and has ridden and competed in most disciplines, even the odd bit of bike polo. Tom is as happy tinkering away in the garage as he is out on the road bike exploring the Worcestershire lanes.