Best cycling shoes 2023 – stylish, stiff and comfortable footwear for cyclists

Specialized S-Works Torch are among the best cycling shoes we've used
(Image credit: Aaron Borrill)

Choosing the best cycling shoes is one of the most significant things you can do to make difference to your ride. The key contact points between you and your bike are at your feet and the right shoes can make a significant difference to comfort levels, especially with the weather warming up as we head into summer. 

Even short rides can become a chore if you are wearing shoes that rub or make your feet sweat excessively. A more serious concern can be pain created by shoes that don't fit correctly or fail to offer the right amount of support. This is even before you consider the benefits a good pair of shoes can have to power transfer to improve the efficiency of your riding.

The best cycling shoes have come a long way in terms of technological advancements. In the 1970s and 1980s, companies such as Cinelli and Look developed the first popular clipless pedals, which allowed cycling shoes to clip in and out of pedals without the need for the previously common toe-clip. This was achieved using springs in the pedal and plastic cleats on the soles of the shoes, and it helped to improve pedalling efficiency and power transfer.

The technology has advanced so much that in order to get the most out of the best road bikes, many would argue that choosing the right shoe and pedal combination is vital. In the past three decades, clipless cycling shoes and pedals have been used almost exclusively at the top of the sport and various shoe brands have emerged to further improve pedalling efficiency with the introduction of stiff carbon fibre soles and various fastening systems for improved power transfer, especially when paired with the best road bike pedals.

This guide features shoes we have tested thoroughly to discover how they rate among the best cycling shoes available on the market. We have compared the specs, scrutinised the build quality and taken them out on the road to see how they perform in real-life conditions, considering comfort, usability, durability and performance.

If you can't find anything to suit your budget in this article, perhaps check out our guide to the best cheap cycling shoes and, when you have found the right pair, don't forget to match them with the best cycling socks for maximum comfort.

The best cycling shoes available today

Why you can trust Cyclingnews Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Best cycling shoes: Rapha Pro Team Powerweave shoes

Rapha's Pro Team Powerweave shoes were difficult to find fault with (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
The best cycling shoes for all round performance

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 36-47
Actual weight: 271g per shoe (size 46)
Fastening system: Li2 Boa system
Colours: 3

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight
+
Out-the-box comfort
+
Extreme stiffness

Reasons to avoid

-
Mesh doesn't keep water out

Rather than use a synthetic microfibre material for the uppers like most of the other best cycling shoes, Rapha has chosen to use what it calls Powerweave. The 3D-woven technology has been designed to give support, flexibility and breathability across the shoe to optimise performance. 

Inside, an adjustable two-part insole takes care of arch support. Adjustable by way of an extra section beneath the arch which can be added or removed to alter the level of support. There's also a pressure-dispersing tongue, which is thicker and doesn't conform to the foot shape quite as much when pulling up in the pedal stroke. When stamping back down, there is a full-length carbon sole for a stiff platform and direct power transfer.

All this adds up to an incredible shoe that we felt deserve a five-star rating. Find out why by reading our Rapha Pro Team Powerweave review.

Specialized S-Works Torch road shoes in green

The Specialized S-Works Torch offers impressive ventilation along with comfortable fit and excellent power transfer (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
An excellent race cycling shoe

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 36-49
Actual weight: 220g per shoe (size 43)
Fastening system: Twin Boa S3
Colours: White, black and green

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable feet tailored further by custom footbeds
+
Two fits available – standard and wide
+
Good ventilation 

Reasons to avoid

-
Some might prefer Boa Li2 dials rather than S3
-
Pricey

The S-Works Torch is the latest edition to the portfolio of shoes from Specialized's premium brand. A replacement for the Works 7 road shoe, the focus is on comfort – but without compromising on performance. And, boy, does it manage to deliver on this brief to immediately place them among the best cycling shoes we've tested. 

The understated looks really hit the mark and the levels of support they offer around the midfoot and heel in particular, thanks in part to custom footbeds, is second to none. This focus on finery has not diminished the power transfer, which is exceptional, and they also boast impressive ventilation. 

The one potential sticking point could have been the use of Boa S3 dials instead of the Li2 configuration – which is seen on the Rapha Pro Team Powerweave, above, and is designed to offer greater levels of adjustment. But we felt the retention system used worked like a dream, allowing precise tweaks to really fine-tune the fit.

Read the Specialized S-Works Torch review to get the full results of our testing, or see our head-to-head between the S-Works Torch vs the S-Works Ares

Bontrager Circuit shoes

The Bontrager Circuit is a high-performance shoe at a great price (Image credit: Josh Ross)
The best budget cycling shoes

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 39-48
Actual weight: 280g per shoe (43)
Fastening system: Boa L6 dial with a hook-and-loop toe strap
Colours: Black, White, Radioactive Red, Radioactive Yellow, and Nautical Navy/Radioactive Coral

Reasons to buy

+
Three-hole or two-hole cleat mounting
+
Lightweight
+
Bold colours

Reasons to avoid

-
Single direction BOA adjustment
-
No cleat adjustability

At the more affordable end of the scale, the Bontrager Circuit road shoe delivers high-performance at a great price, looks good, feels comfortable, and is compatible with both three- or two-bolt cleats. We've found them to be long-lasting and perform well throughout their lifetime.

Constructed around a synthetic mesh and TPU upper combined with a nylon composite Bronze Series sole, the Circuits come with a stiffness rating of seven out of 14, lending themselves well to more everyday riding where some flex and comfort is needed.

They're secured in place using a Boa L6 dial, which allows you to achieve a precision fit on the go, paired with a hook-and-loop Velcro strap at the toe for snugging up or loosening as needed.

Compared to the more expensive options among the best cycling shoes, they have less zonal adjustment, but this is unlikely to be an issue for most people – and they can be picked up for more than half the price of the Specialized S-Works Vent.

Read our full review of the Bontrager Circuit road shoes to get the full picture.

S-Works Vent road shoes seen from back and side

The S-Works Vent was designed to be a highly breathable, fair-weather shoe (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
Best cycling shoes for breathability

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 36-49
Actual weight: 281g per shoe (size 46)
Fastening system: Boa S3-Snap dials x2
Colours: Black, white

Reasons to buy

+
Immediately comfortable
+
Highly breathable
+
Lightweight at 281g (EU46)

Reasons to avoid

-
Tongue 'falls' outwards
-
Premium price

Specialized's S-Works Vent shoes donned many feet in the pro peloton at the 2021 Tour de France, and for good reason. Designed to be highly breathable in hot summer weather, we've found them to deliver on that promise and then some. 

Unlike some of the best cycling shoes that still require 'breaking in', the S-Works Vent shoes were immediately comfortable, and they perform to an extremely high standard. We actually found very little to complain about, with their well-ventilated design lending them well to both indoor and outdoor cycling when the temperature is high.

They come with a carbon outsole that has a stiffness index rating of 13 out of 15, putting them just below the Specialized S-Works Torch we have already featured in this list in terms of stiffness. Weighing a feathery 281g per shoe, they may come with a premium price tag but if you're serious about competing, then these are one heck of an upgrade you could make to your performance.

Read our full review to find out why we gave the Specialized S-Works Vent four and a half stars.

Fizik Vento Powerstrap R2 Aeroweave

The Fizik Vento Powerstrap R2 Aeroweave is one of the stiffest road shoes available (Image credit: Josh Ross)
A great lightweight option

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 36-48 (half-sizes available)
Actual weight: 249g per shoe (43)
Fastening system: Powerstrap
Colours: Black

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight
+
Well-designed adjustable cleat mounting
+
Closure system is easy to use and works well
+
Good venting in the sole

Reasons to avoid

-
Only one colour

The R2 Aeroweave from Fizik is an easy shoe to love, thanks to its incredible light weight and upper construction that is so open it accepts all airflow without resistance.

The carbon outsole scores 10 out of 10 on Fizik's stiffness scale, though it's worth bearing in mind that this isn't a comparison that translates easily to other brands' offerings. However, if you're familiar with Fizik's footwear then you can rest assured that this is one of its stiffest available among the best cycling shoes on the market. The sole is on the narrower side, but this is counteracted by the more forgiving upper, so unless you have particularly wide feet, it shouldn't be an issue for many.

If you value movement and comfort over a bulky-but-enveloped feel, then these are ideal.

Read our full review of the Fizik Vento Powerstrap R2 Aeroweave road shoes to find out more.

Lake CX403 Road Cycling Shoes in a distinctive Chameleon Blue/Black colour

The Lake CX403 shoe is unique in the way it can be moulded to your foot (Image credit: Josh Ross)
The best cycling shoe for a custom fit

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 39-46.5 (half sizes available)
Actual weight: 340g per shoe (44.5)
Fastening system: IP1-S
Colours: White/Black, Black/Silver, Chameleon Green, Chameleon Blue/Black

Reasons to buy

+
Heat mouldable as many times as you'd like
+
Gorgeous colour options
+
Custom designs available

Reasons to avoid

-
Not enough toe protection from tyre rub
-
Expensive

They may be pricey, but there's nothing else quite like them on the market. Lake's CX403 road shoes are loaded with technology and feel almost like a custom shoe in the way they're put together.

The upper is made from supple kangaroo leather combined with CX6 carbon fibre fabric, which supports effective power transfer and gets better and better over time, moulding to the shape of your foot. Speaking of moulding, it also comes with a heat-mouldable carbon sole, so the shoes will gradually come to fit you better than anything else you can get off the shelf.

Whether you're climbing at max power or riding throughout the day, they feel incredibly supportive and solid, and will last a long time. However, with all that support and solid power transfer comes a bit of bulk, so they are a heavier option, coming in at almost 100g per shoe above the Fizik Vento Powerstrap R2 Aeroweave.

Find out more about what the Lake CX403 road shoes have to offer with our full review.

Giro Empire SLX cycling shoes in silver seen from the side

The lace-up Giro Empire SLX have a customisable arch support system (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
The best lace up cycling shoes

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 39-48
Claimed weight: 370g per shoe (size 42.5)
Fastening system: Lace
Colours: 3

Reasons to buy

+
Light and stiff
+
Infinitely adjustable fit
+
Tunable arch support

Reasons to avoid

-
Not adjustable on the fly

The big advantage of laces is that they offer fantastic modulation of pressure across the foot and, paired with Giro’s Evofiber SL microfibre upper, result in a shoe that is extremely comfortable. As the Empire SLX shoes don’t feature any fastening hardware, they are also feathery light. Laces aren’t without their negatives though, getting the Empires on and off takes a little longer and minor adjustments mid-ride are a faff as you need to stop to re-tie them – a far cry from the micro-adjustable Boa system featured on the likes of the Rapha Pro Team Powerweave at the top of this list.

The Giro Empire SLX features an Easton EC90 SLX2 carbon sole which is stiff and thin, making for a fantastic pedalling platform. Rather than building arch support into the shoe itself, the footbed is customisable using an included SuperNatural Fit Kit arch support system allowing fine-tuning.

So despite the laces, these are still a high-performance option that is potentially unrivalled amongst the best cycling shoes in terms of low weight and comfort – check out our full review of the Giro Empire SLX for a closer look.

Bont Vaypor S cycling shoe in black, pictured on a rock

The Bont Vaypor S has a unique toe box (Image credit: Colin Levitch)
The best cycling shoes for low stack height

Specifications

Sizes available: EU36-50
Actual weight: 278g per shoe (size 44.5 wide)
Fastening system: Boa IP-1 x2
Colours: 6

Reasons to buy

+
Gold-standard for sole stiffness
+
Low stack height
+
Heat-mould in your kitchen

Reasons to avoid

-
Price
-
Sizing can be a bit intimidating

Bont shoes are actually shaped like feet, which is surprisingly rare in the cycling industry. When you put a pair of Bonts next to shoes from just about any other brand, the toe box is comparatively broad and round because of the anatomical shaping. Bont also designs its shoes to support the foot entirely without the need for custom footbeds, arch wedges, and the like. They achieve this through the bathtub shaped outsole, medial longitudinal arch support, and a true heel cup. 

Bont's fitting party piece is its use of a proprietary resin that softens at around 70°C/158°F, this means you can have custom-fitted shoe by simply popping them in the oven at home. 

Beyond the fit, the uber-stiff sole and non-stretch Durolite upper mean the Vaypor S is most definitely a race shoe and the dual Boa IP1 dial is used to bring it all together.

Find out more in our full review of the Bont Vaypor S.

Best cycling shoes: Bontrager XXX road shoes in white

The Bontrager XXX is the shoe of choice for Trek-Segafredo's riders (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
A perfect option for those after comfort and performance

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 37-47
Claimed weight: n/a
Fastening system: Boa x2
Colours: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Neoprene at contact points
+
Comfort
+
Ventilation
+
Stiffness

Reasons to avoid

-
Bontrager's sizing can be confusing

The XXX road is the range-topping performance road shoe from Bontrager. With a stiffness index rating of 14, it's the stiffest on offer from Trek's components brand. They feature neoprene pads at the contact points, twin Boa dials, and a replaceable heel-pad. Worn predominantly by Trek-Segafredo, they're clearly good enough for the very top of the sport. 

The only bugbear is the sizing. This complaint applies across the range, but UK sizing appears to be off, meaning it's required to size up when buying Bontrager shoes. 

Sizing issues aside, the Bontrager XXX road shoes are up there with the most comfortable we've ever tested, rivalling the Specialized S-Works Torch. The no-slip lining in the heel ensures a secure, yet not vice-tight fit. Ventilation is fantastic, stiffness holds its own against the best cycling shoes, and they perform as any top-level race-ready road shoe should.

Read our full Bontrager XXX road shoes review to find out why we gave them a four-and-a-half-star rating to place them among the best cycling shoes.

Fizik Infinito R1 cycling shoes in white on a lawn

The top Boa dial on the Fizik Infinito R1 manages support while the lower dial can be adjusted to relieve pressure (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
The best cycling shoes for grand tour performance

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 37-48
Actual weight: 307g per shoe (size 46)
Fastening system: Boa IP1 rotating dials x2
Colours: 4 plus Movistar Team editions, ‘Knit’ versions also available

Reasons to buy

+
Stiff
+
Range of colours and finishes available
+
Grand Tour winning

Reasons to avoid

-
Weight
-
Sole is easily scuffed

As you would expect from a shoe that features so prominently in the WorldTour, the Infinito outsole provides an extremely stable pedalling platform that will enable comfortable riding all day. The insoles used are Fizik’s Infinito footbeds with arch support managed by Fizik’s Dynamic Arch Support system.

The Dynamic Arch Support is part of Fizik’s Infinito Closure System that works together with Fizik’s Increased Volume Control design. This is managed by two IP1 Boa dials on the side of the shoe. The top Boa closes the shoe, providing support for the foot, and the lower Boa manages forefoot pressure to eliminate hot spots.

The uppers are made from perforated Microtex and, in combination with the mesh insole, offer great ventilation. 

If you regularly ride in hot conditions (or enjoy indoor cycling on a turbo trainer), then the knit version will offer even better breathability.

Read our in-depth review of the Fizik Infinito R1 road shoes to find out why it made our list of the best cycling shoes.

Best cycling shoes: Shimano S-Phyre RC902 in blue placed on a fallen tree trunk

Shimano's S-Phyre RC902 offer a great deal of cleat adjustment (Image credit: Colin Levitch)
The best cycling shoe for cleat adjustment

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 36-48
Actual weight: 256g per shoe (size 45)
Fastening system: Boa Li2 rotating dials x2
Colours: 4
As worn by: Jumbo-Visma

Reasons to buy

+
Stiff
+
Vastly improved ventilation
+
Heel retention
+
11mm of cleat adjustability

Reasons to avoid

-
Price
-
New narrower fit

Shimano has continued with its one-piece wrap-around design from the previous iteration of these shoes which holds the foot snugly while reducing edges or seams that may cause discomfort. The upper has small perforations across the toe and improved vents in the sole to allow for cooling on hot days. The shoe is secured by two Li2 Boa dials that offer quick micro-adjustments to assure foot security when pedalling. An external heel cup has been reworked to be more torsionally stiff to minimise heel roll and uses silicone grips to stop the heel from lifting out.

The S-Phyre RC902 sole has the highest rating on Shimano’s stiffness scale and features a unibody construction that reduces stack height to improve pedalling feel. By using a removable chip system, the S-Phyres have 11mm of cleat adjustment and plenty of guides to assure that cleats are aligned just right.

Read the full review of the Shimano S-Phyre RC902 to get a better idea of how it performed. 

Best cycling shoes: Giro Imperial road shoes in black placed on a pebble surface

The build quality of the Giro Imperial road shoe is exceptional (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
The best cycling shoe for space-age aesthetics and performance

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 39-48
Actual weight: 224g per shoe (size 42.5)
Fastening system: Twin Boa
Colours: 3

Reasons to buy

+
Stiff and light
+
Look brilliant

Reasons to avoid

-
Mesh-reinforced uppers are not ideal for winter temperatures
-
Not the cheapest option in the segment

They may not be the lightest model in the Giro line-up but at 224g per shoe, the Imperial is certainly no heavyweight and only misses out by 4g to the lightest shoe on this list, the Specialized S-Works Torch. The Easton EC90 SLX 2 carbon-fibre soles are stiff and responsive, providing a solid platform from which to pedal – and while there's no flex, this has done little to impact comfort when spending several hours on the bike.

The build quality is exceptional, which is to be expected from a halo model of this nature. The micro-adjustable Boa IP1 dials operate incrementally via a series of soft-lace guides that ensure an even spread of tension, which also minimises hotspots and helps with support.

There's no doubting the Giro Imperial's premium feel – not only in terms of functionality but performance, too. While they're appreciably light, this has done little to affect the way they perform or feel on the foot. In fact, they're super comfortable and mould to your feet's contours like a vacuum-sealed lunch bag.

Get the full lowdown in our Giro Imperial road shoes review. 

Sidi Wire 2 Carbon Air shoes in purple, viewed from front

The Sidi Wire 2 Carbon Air shoes come with replaceable heel and toe pads (Image credit: Josh Croxton)
The best cycling shoes for adjustable fit

Specifications

Sizes available: EU 38-48
Weight: 315g per shoe (size 42)
Fastening system: Proprietary rotational dials x2
Colours: 4

Reasons to buy

+
Plenty of adjustability
+
Replaceable heel and toe pad
+
Stylish matt finish

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy

The Sidi Wire 2 was launched in 2018 and has since been seen on the feet of Alberto Bettiol and Vincenzo Nibali. The Sidi Wire 2 shoes are, like the Sidi Shot, largely customisable at the expense of a bit of weight. At 630g per pair (EU42), they're considerably porkier than some, but they feel like they've been broken in straight out of the box. 

Comfort is key in cycling shoes, and the Wire 2 offers just that, thanks to its two retention dials, upper-foot closure strap, and an adjustable heel cup. With an RRP of £330.00, they're a bit of an investment. Thankfully, the replaceable heel and toe pads mean you're not left in the market for new shoes once these parts wear out. 

This Air version has the edition of hundreds of tiny ventilation holes across the surface.

Compared to the Shot, the Wire 2 moves the upper retention dial away from the forefoot to the outstep, and uses a 'soft instep closure system' for more comfort across the first metatarsal. 

Get more insight into all the technology that has gone into these shoes with our Sidi Wire 2 Carbon Air shoes review.

How to choose the best cycling shoes for you

Do good cycling shoes make a difference?

It is worth putting a lot of consideration into the shoes you use for cycling because they have such a huge potential to affect the quality of your ride.

Obviously you are pedalling with your feet and, at a very basic level, you want this to be as comfortable an experience as possible. So the fit of your shoes is the number one consideration. 

If you are using clipless pedals, the construction of the outsole, and in particular the part that attaches to the pedals via the cleats, becomes all the more important. In general, manufacturers say that increased rigidity and stiffness will increase power transfer and pedalling efficiency. 

This can come with some detriment to comfort, however, and stiffer shoes are certainly less comfortable off the bike, so different types of riding – be it recreational or racing, road or off-road – will require different types of footwear. 

There is also a lot of attention paid to the types of fastening system used on shoes, which includes traditional laces, velcro straps, or dial tightening systems. 

Laces tend to offer a good level of upper-foot comfort and adjustability at a low weight. However, it is not possible to adjust a lace without stopping at the roadside, and a white fabric lace will soon become grey and dirty if riding in bad weather. 

Velcro or straps tend to offer a similar level of on-the-fly adjustment, but it's not uncommon for the hook-and-loop to lose its secure feel after a year or so of use. 

Rotary dials, such as those from the market leader Boa, pull cables across the foot to secure the shoe. A single dial will often have routed cables in the fashion of a lace, while two dials will offer separate forefoot and upper foot adjustability. They usually include a quick-release option and are quick and easy to fasten up both pre- and mid-ride. The small downside is that they tend not to play too well with overshoes.

How do I know what size cycling shoes to buy?

When looking for the best cycling shoes, the most important factor is fit. The majority of cycling shoe manufacturers offer a wide range of sizes, often incorporating half sizes, with some brands also offering ‘wide fit’ options. We recommend you try before you buy, as various manufacturers have reputations for producing shoes that are narrower or wider that average. Some brands, such as Bont, also allow home custom moulding through careful heating of the shoes in an oven.

There's also a variance in the conversion across EU, US and UK sizing between the different brands – and sometimes even different models from the same brand. In our testing, we've found that an EU46 is usually a UK size 11, but it can and does vary. 

Arch support is generally built into the shoe, with some offering a flatter base than others. Rapha, Shimano and Giro offer an adjustable insole with their shoes but, for those with particularly high or low arches, different insoles can also be retrofitted to your shoe of choice, with various options depending on the arch of your feet. Specialized's Body Geometry footbeds (opens in new tab) are well-renowned in this sphere, alongside its custom footbed option. This will not only improve comfort and pedalling efficiency but can also help to prevent injuries.

Should cycling shoes be stiff

All of the best cycling shoes feature carbon fibre soles that help to simultaneously reduce weight and increase stiffness, creating an efficient pedalling platform to ensure all of your energy transfers through your pedal stroke to the drivetrain.

Shoes come with a stiffness rating – which unfortunately varies from manufacturer to manufacturer – and general wisdom dictates that a stiffer shoe will offer better performance. But there is a balance to be had between stiffness and comfort, and individual preferences come in to play, as well as cycling discipline. Mountain bikers or cyclocross riders who spend a lot of time out of the saddle pushing or carrying their bikes will often prefer more flex to their shoes.   

Most of this stiffness is in the sole but the construction of the uppers is also important, particularly coming into play on the upstroke when using clipless pedals – although this can be as much about fit as stiffness.

Uppers are often made with synthetic materials, although a few brands continue to use leather, and a number of shoes are now available with a knitted upper, which proposes greater comfort and breathability. 

The construction and durability should play a part in your choice, as the longer a pair of shoes last, the better value they become. Even after they've become tattered and beaten, if they still stand up to the daily grind, then they can be paired with some overshoes and relegated to your pair of bad-weather or winter shoes, which will be cheaper than buying dedicated winter cycling shoes

Do lighter cycling shoes make a difference?

Opinions will vary on this one. If you are all about finding marginal gains wherever you can, then the weight of your shoes will make some sort of difference – in particular when accelerating, as the force you need to apply through the pedals and shoes will increase with the mass you are applying it to. 

But the fit, stiffness and comfort – and even durability – of your shoes should be higher up your list of priorities than weight. 

Sidi shoes, for example, have a reputation for being heavy but have replaceable heel and toe pads and are known for their hard-wearing characteristics and longevity versus some other similarly priced shoes.

Other options from the likes of Specialized can be very lightweight and stiff but don’t always offer replaceable pads on the sole, which can be off-putting for some.

Another consideration to think about when buying the best cycling shoes is ventilation. If you're only going to be riding in the toasty summers of southern Europe, then knit or a well-vented shoe will likely be a better choice. If you're racing predominantly in the north of England, then perhaps look for something with a bit more coverage, or expect to need overshoes

How we test

Like saddles and bib shorts there is a certain percentage of the performance of a bike shoe that is down to personal fit. We test each pair thoroughly, and even if they don't fit us perfectly we have enough experience to tease out the positives. 

We'll ride them in heat and rain to see how they cope with different weathers, and for enough time to see if they begin to lose that boxfresh fit. All day performance is as much a factor as how each pair handles the all-out power of a hill sprint, so naturally we'll cover both extremes and everything in between.

Josh Croxton
Tech Editor

As the Tech Editor here at Cyclingnews, Josh leads on content relating to all-things tech, including bikes, kit and components in order to cover product launches and curate our world-class buying guides, reviews and deals. Alongside this, his love for WorldTour racing and eagle eyes mean he's often breaking tech stories from the pro peloton too. 


On the bike, 30-year-old Josh has been riding and racing since his early teens. He started out racing cross country when 26-inch wheels and triple chainsets were still mainstream, but he found favour in road racing in his early 20s and has never looked back. He's always training for the next big event and is keen to get his hands on the newest tech to help. He enjoys a good long ride on road or gravel, but he's most alive when he's elbow-to-elbow in a local criterium. 

With contributions from