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USADA does have jurisdiction over Armstrong case, says WADA

By:
Cycling News
Published:
August 08, 2012, 1:32 BST,
Updated:
August 08, 2012, 2:32 BST
Edition:
First Edition Cycling News, Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Director General of the WADA, David Howman

Director General of the WADA, David Howman

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Howman calls for UCI to assist in providing evidence

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has weighed in on the latest revelation in the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) case against Lance Armstrong and his associates, after the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) called for evidence in the case to be handed over.

The UCI claims that it has jurisdiction in the case, the same argument used by Armstrong in his plea to have the charges against him dropped.

WADA Director General David Howman first wrote to UCI President Pat McQuaid on August 7 and then released a statement today explaining that cycling's governing body should be providing assistance to USADA.

"As clarified in the WADA letter, Article 15.3 states that the Anti-Doping Organization (ADO) 'which discovered the violation' must have results management authority, and not the ADO which discovered the first shred of evidence which then led to the discovery of violations," the Agency said in a statement.

WADA also explained that there is "no provision" within its rules "that allows the UCI to interfere with the USADA case" or demand to see the USADA-compiled evidence.

"The letter also confirmed that WADA regularly reviews USADA's processes and has consistently found them to be compliant with the Code, and that the UCI has in the past been satisfied with USADA's results management and its due process, citing the cases of Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis," the statement continued.

"Furthermore, Mr. Howman points out that nowhere in the Code is an ADO required to 'turn over its witnesses and evidence in advance of the arbitration process', as the UCI claimed in its letters."

 

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