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Met Codatronca TT helmet review

A fast, extremely comfortable short-tail time trial helmet that won't break the bank

Met Codatronca TT helmet arranged in profile showing off its short-tail design blueprint
(Image: © Aaron Borrill)

Our Verdict

Ideal for time triallists looking for speed but not willing to sacrifice comfort

For

  • Class-leading fit and comfort
  • Well sorted strap management
  • Magnetic strap clip
  • Adjustable Safe-T Orbital fit system
  • Removable, magnetic visor

Against

  • Visor can rub against the bridge of the nose

Cutting through the air as fast and efficiently as possible is the name of the game when it comes to time trials and the helmet represents one of the most important attributes in this regard. The best time trial helmets offer a balanced meld of protection and aerodynamics but blueprints have evolved over the past few years with short-tail helmets becoming increasingly popular. 

We've already reviewed the Rudy Project The Wing TT helmet, an option that excels in a variety of rider positions and Met's Codatronca TT helmet follows a very similar approach. Developed and tested in the wind tunnels of Politecnico di Milano and Milano Newton Labhe, the science behind this rhetoric is simple: by docking the tail of a long TT helmet, the head can move freely in multiple positions while remaining aerodynamic from all angles. These short-tail helmets have subsequently become the go-to option for riders of all abilities - professionals included. In fact, two-time Tour de France winner Tadej Pogačar, claimed a resounding victory on stage 5 of this year's edition using a Met Codatronca.

We've been using the Met Codatronca TT helmet for a few weeks now and have come away impressed with its superlative levels of comfort and performance. Here's what we think so far. 

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Met Codatronca TT helmet

Met's Codatronca is only available in two colour options: white/black and black/red (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

There are three visor options that connect by way of magnets (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

Unlike time trial helmets of old, the Met Codatronca represents a new wave of short-tail designs (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

The visor slants backwards, which can connect with the bridge of the nose depending on how you position it on your head (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

A single, rear exhaust port helps channel pressured air collected at the front (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

Ventilation is taken care of by three vents... (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

...which do a sterling job of keeping the head cool, especially in hot weather conditions (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)

Design and aesthetics

The Codatronca is only available in two colour options: white/black (pictured here) and black/red, and while I would have preferred the black version owing to its stealthy, kit-matching aesthetics, the white/back version has grown on me. See, it's not just a flat splash of colour - instead, it comprises a textural play between glossy and matte surfaces which adds a premium feel to the overall appearance. The clinical colourway is contrasted by a lick of black on each flank and again on the rear exhaust port. The decals should have continued this contrasting darker theme but Met elected to plaster it with white-on-white instead, which is almost impossible to spot from distance.

Looking at the dimensions, it's proportionally larger than the Rudy Project The Wing TT helmet we tested a few months back but Met claims this wider design guides air over the shoulders and reduces drag. It features three strategically positioned vents on the frontal area just above the visor that help cool the head and move air out the rear exhaust port. Speaking of the visor, the Codatronca is available in three colour lenses - fumè (smoke), clear and mirror.

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Met Codatronca TT helmet

Met's Safe-T Orbital fit system is one of the best retention systems on the market (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

It can be tweaked for three positions for vertical adjustment and two positions for occipital adjustment, plus it caters for those with ponytails (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

Padding is taken care of by a compressive yet strategically laid out gel Velcro arrangement (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)

Specifications and user experience 

The helmet is built around an EPS core and covered in a polycarbonate shell. There's no exposed EPS foam, not even along the bottom of the helmet which should see it hold up well to wear and tear over time. The Codatronca outshines its rivals when it comes to fit and comfort - there's no restriction around the ears and forehead and the retention can be tailored according to your preferences. Having used the helmet on rides of up to two and half hours I'm yet to experience any sort of discomfort which bodes well for those who enjoy longer time trials or triathlons.

The security comes courtesy of Met's Safe-T Orbital fit system, which is essentially a belt that runs the circumference of the helmet providing 360-degree adjustment. The fit can be further tweaked with three positions for vertical adjustment and two positions for occipital adjustment, plus it caters for those with ponytails. This retention system is comprehensibly insulated by gel padding inserts located along the brow and upper sections of the cranial area. 

Met offers the Codatronca in three sizes: small, medium and large, and while I think I might have got away with using a small, the medium provides a rather comfortable fit - particularly around the ears which can sometimes become irritated and compressed depending on the make of helmet. In terms of weight, it's bang-on with its rivals - a medium tips the scales at 374g (actual, including visor).

Another area of excellence is the magnetic visor. It's held securely in place by four magnets and has been designed to offer an unobstructed and commanding field of view. The visor has also been treated to an anti-fog coating - which works, even in temperatures of 34-degrees and above. I tested this over several days of hot-weather riding and came away impressed by the visor lens' ability to stave off condensation and remain clear. If it does get a little too hot, the visor can be turned around and secured to the top area of the helmet via four strategically placed magnets. The only real issue I've experienced to date - and it's more of a bugbear - is that the visor often hits the bridge of my nose on bumpier sections of road, granted this might have something to do with its rearward slanting design.

The three-vent system works well - particularly when it's hot - and lets in just the right amount of air to keep operating temperatures optimal. 

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Met Codatronca TT helmet

When not racing, the visor can be turned around and secured to the top area of the helmet via four strategically placed magnets (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

An aerial shot of the helmet with visor stowed away (Image credit: Aaron Borril)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

A closer look at the gloss-black exhaust port (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)
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Met Codatronca TT helmet

A medium tips the scales at 374g (actual, including visor) (Image credit: Aaron Borrill)

Verdict

It all comes down to what you want from a time trial helmet. For many riders, a short-tail time trial helmet represents a no-brainer, especially given how difficult it can be to maintain the ideal time trial position over 10 or 25 miles. The Met Codatronca does everything it says on the box, very, very well. It's fast, comfortable and surprisingly well ventilated not to mention aerodynamically proficient from all angles. It's really difficult to fault.

Choosing between it and something like the Rudy Project The Wing TT helmet will always pose a tough decision (they're both at the top of the short-tail time trial helmet list) but the price is always going to be the determining factor; more so when the playing fields are so even. At £270 / $300 (£82 / $99 cheaper than Rudy Project's offering) the Met Codatronca time trial helmet should be at the top of your list. I'd suggest getting it in black though as the white colourway doesn't do it any justice.

Tech Specs: Met Codatronca TT helmet

  • Price: £270 / $300
  • Weight: 374g (medium, with visor)
  • Rotational safety: No
  • Sizes: S, M, L
  • Colours: White or black