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Awang ruled out of track world championships

By:
Daniel Benson
Published:
February 20, 2011, 11:18 GMT,
Updated:
February 20, 2011, 12:14 GMT
Edition:
Track Cycling News & Racing Round-up, Friday, February 25, 2011
Race:
UCI Track World Cup IV
Aziz Awang's (Malaysia) leg after the crash

Aziz Awang's (Malaysia) leg after the crash

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Set to have surgery to remove splinter this morning

Aziz Awang (Malaysia) is still in hospital after suffering a horrendous injury in last night’s Keirin final and will miss the world championships next month in Apeldoorn, Holland.

The Malaysian ‘pocket-rocket’ sprinter is scheduled to undergo surgery Sunday morning after a splinter, 9 inches in length, went through his lower left leg. Head coach of the Malaysian track team, John Beasley, believes that Awang can still make a full recovery ahead of next year’s Olympic Games in London.

“He had a scan this morning so they could find out if it has gone through any veins or arteries. This morning they’ll remove it and all going well we can fly him home in a week. He’s the Chris Hoy of Malaysian cycling so for us it’s about getting him right for the Olympics,” Beasley said.

“It’s sad that he won’t be at worlds but we just want him to get back on track, slowly, slowly. He’s a tough little character and he races giants. All he’s worried about is the Olympics but he’ll be fine. We’ll make sure that we bring things on nice and steady.”

Despite the crash and the subsequent injury, Awang got back to his feet and finished the race in third place, unaware of the injury to his leg. The points secured in finishing third were enough to secure the overall standings in the Keirin World Cup, ahead of Hoy, but as he stood by the barriers assessing the cuts to his back and arms he glanced down to see the full extent of his wounds.

“It was most probably a pedal that had gone into the track and he’s slid into the splinter. The only way they can do it is by surgically going in from both ends and spreading it apart and pulling it out.” said Beasley.

 


 

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