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Lampre-ISD unveils new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR road machine

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Barrel adjusters are built into the cable access port on the down tube. The removable panel should ease maintenance, and we anticipate a second version for electronic drivetrains.

Barrel adjusters are built into the cable access port on the down tube. The removable panel should ease maintenance, and we anticipate a second version for electronic drivetrains. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR features squared-off tube shapes throughout.

The new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR features squared-off tube shapes throughout. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The squared-off integrated seatmast is topped by a new carbon fiber Ritchey Superlogic one-bolt head.

The squared-off integrated seatmast is topped by a new carbon fiber Ritchey Superlogic one-bolt head. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Wilier Triestina proudly puts the frame's tech features right on the top tube. Some folks might prefer a more subtle approach, though.

Wilier Triestina proudly puts the frame's tech features right on the top tube. Some folks might prefer a more subtle approach, though. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The neon paint makes it tough to see but there's a pronounced shoulder running from the bottom of the head tube up to the sides of the top tube.

The neon paint makes it tough to see but there's a pronounced shoulder running from the bottom of the head tube up to the sides of the top tube. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Lampre-ISD mechanics were preparing new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR machines prior to the start of this year's Tour de France.

Lampre-ISD mechanics were preparing new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR machines prior to the start of this year's Tour de France. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Wilier Triestina's new Cento 1 SR features a tapered front end.

Wilier Triestina's new Cento 1 SR features a tapered front end. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The fork crown is neatly blended into the surrounding head tube and down tube.

The fork crown is neatly blended into the surrounding head tube and down tube. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Pairing with the new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR is a stout-looking carbon fiber fork with a tapered steerer.

Pairing with the new Wilier Triestina Cento 1 SR is a stout-looking carbon fiber fork with a tapered steerer. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The aluminum front derailleur tab is stoutly attached with four rivets. Note the grommet just below it for wire routing.

The aluminum front derailleur tab is stoutly attached with four rivets. Note the grommet just below it for wire routing. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Carbon dropouts replaceable a replaceable hanger. The rear derailleur cable runs through the chain stay.

Carbon dropouts replaceable a replaceable hanger. The rear derailleur cable runs through the chain stay. (Image credit: James Huang)
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The chain stays are highly asymmetrical, differing both in profile from driveside to non-driveside as well as the respective paths from bottom bracket to dropout.

The chain stays are highly asymmetrical, differing both in profile from driveside to non-driveside as well as the respective paths from bottom bracket to dropout. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Wilier Triestina has built a BB386 Evo bottom bracket shell into the new Cento 1 SR.

Wilier Triestina has built a BB386 Evo bottom bracket shell into the new Cento 1 SR. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Battery mounts for electronic transmissions are included on the underside of the down tube.

Battery mounts for electronic transmissions are included on the underside of the down tube. (Image credit: James Huang)
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Seat stays are wide but relatively flat, suggesting a comfortable ride that still won’t wag under power.

Seat stays are wide but relatively flat, suggesting a comfortable ride that still won’t wag under power. (Image credit: James Huang)

This article originally published on BikeRadar

Lampre-ISD team mechanics were preparing new road machines for the riders prior to the start of this year's Tour de France. Wilier Triestina has yet to release much official information on the new Cento 1 SR but it's a significant change from the current version.

Unlike recent debuts from Scott and Trek, the Cento 1 SR doesn't appear to use any sort of truncated airfoils. Adding in Wilier Triestina's recent launch of the ultralight Zero.7 model, we expect this new SR to focus more on stiffness while still maintaining good weight and comfort metrics – meaning the 'SR' designation could very well stand for 'Super Rigido'.

Tube shapes are dramatically different throughout with squared-off profiles instead of the old Cento 1's mostly round forms, enormous asymmetrical chain stays, an ultra-wide BB386 Evo bottom bracket shell with press-fit cups, and notably wide and flat seat stays. The front end is built with a tapered steerer tube and a stout carbon fiber fork whose crown is neatly blended into the down tube for clean and integrated look. Topping the seat mast is a carbon fiber Ritchey Superlogic one-bolt head.

Additional details include carbon rear dropouts with a replaceable aluminum hanger, a riveted-on aluminum front derailleur tab, and interchangeable fully internal routing for either mechanical or electronic transmissions.

Wilier Triestina's solution for the conversion looks impressively clever, too. In mechanical trim, the removable access panel atop the down tube should make it easier to feed cables through the down tube and barrel adjusters are built in. We didn't see an electronic version ourselves but there's little question that there is one. A battery mount is included on the underside of the down tube towards the bottom bracket.

There's no word from Wilier Triestina just yet on retail pricing, claimed weight, or specific technical features and design philosophies but we expect complete information no later than the Eurobike trade show in August. Wilier Triestina has so far only announced that the new bike will be offered with Campagnolo, Shimano, or SRAM build kits and in a choice of six colors – which hopefully will include the team's brilliant neon hue.