Skip to main content

Connor McCutcheon's Team Illuminate Specialized S-Works - Galllery

Image 1 of 12

Connor McCutcheon's Team Illuminate Specialized S-Works

Connor McCutcheon's Team Illuminate Specialized S-Works
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 2 of 12

Di2 sprint shifters are a small but welcome detail for many riders

Di2 sprint shifters are a small but welcome detail for many riders
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 3 of 12

The Pioneer left arm can be pulled off and used as a standalone power meter on a second bike, in addition to providing left/right information when used with the full system

The Pioneer left arm can be pulled off and used as a standalone power meter on a second bike, in addition to providing left/right information when used with the full system
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 4 of 12

Trusty but verify: McCutcheon loops his Pioneer computer onto his bar, just in case

Trusty but verify: McCutcheon loops his Pioneer computer onto his bar, just in case
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 5 of 12

Pioneer's power meter mounts on Shimano cranks, and now comes in dual-leg and single-leg options

Pioneer's power meter mounts on Shimano cranks, and now comes in dual-leg and single-leg options
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 6 of 12

Pioneer's computer records all the standard metrics, plus the company's unique vector force directional analysis

Pioneer's computer records all the standard metrics, plus the company's unique vector force directional analysis
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 7 of 12

McCutcheon races on IRC clinchers, often with latex tubes and a little talcum powder in between the tube and the tire

McCutcheon races on IRC clinchers, often with latex tubes and a little talcum powder in between the tube and the tire
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 8 of 12

Knight has three depths of carbon clinchers, with three choices of hubs (Aivee SR5, Chris King R45 and DT Swiss 240s)

Knight has three depths of carbon clinchers, with three choices of hubs (Aivee SR5, Chris King R45 and DT Swiss 240s)
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 9 of 12

Knight Composites is the relatively new collaboration between industry veterans Beverly Lucas (Felt, Enve), Jim Pfeil (Reynolds, Edge/Enve, Neil Pryde) and Kevin Quan (Cervélo, Kevin Quan Studios)

Knight Composites is the relatively new collaboration between industry veterans Beverly Lucas (Felt, Enve), Jim Pfeil (Reynolds, Edge/Enve, Neil Pryde) and Kevin Quan (Cervélo, Kevin Quan Studios)
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 10 of 12

Selle SMP saddles are becoming more popular, but their distinctive shape still causes double takes

Selle SMP saddles are becoming more popular, but their distinctive shape still causes double takes
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 11 of 12

McCutcheon won stage 1 of the Tour of Iran

McCutcheon won stage 1 of the Tour of Iran
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)
Image 12 of 12

File this one under "an ounce of prevention": Sure, the Di2 wire probably wouldn't end up in the cassette, but a smart mechanic doesn't settle for "probably"

File this one under "an ounce of prevention": Sure, the Di2 wire probably wouldn't end up in the cassette, but a smart mechanic doesn't settle for "probably"
(Image credit: Ben Delaney/Immediate Media)

This article originally appeared on BikeRadar

Connor McCutcheon's Team Illuminate has the most remarkable kit in the pro peloton. In stark contrast to the rolling billboards of every pro team ever, there isn't a single logo plastered across the black Q36.5 clothing.

McCutcheon's bike isn't quite as different as the no-logo kit, but there are some unusual bits on it. BikeRadar caught up with the American rider who won a stage of this year's Tour of Iran and the most aggressive rider prize on stage 9 at the Tour of Qinghai Lake.

While all WorldTour pros still race on tubulars, some American Continental pros race on clinchers. McCutcheon is one such rider.

"I like to put latex tubes in the tires, and talcum powder helps with punctures," McCutcheon said. "I did [the Tour of] Iran without a single flat, and the roads are not good there — massive potholes, glass, debris on the road."

His Selle SMP saddle, with its huge center channel and bent-beak nose, is not yet a common site in the pro peloton, either. After having some issues with saddle sores, he put on the SMP before riding to the team training camp in Southern California from Bend, Oregon — 850mi/1,368km away. "I was just camping along the way," he said. "I had problems with my previous saddle. By the time I got to team camp, everything was fine. I haven't taken the saddle off since."

Team Illuminate uses wheels from Knight Composites, the relatively new collaboration between industry veterans Beverly Lucas (formerly of Felt and Enve), Jim Pfeil (formerly of Reynolds, Edge/Enve and Neil Pryde) and Kevin Quan (formerly of Cervélo and Kevin Quan Studios). Knight has three depths of carbon clinchers, with three choices of hubs: Aivee SR5, Chris King R45 and DT Swiss 240s. McCutcheon has the French Aivee hubs on his Knight clinchers.

For power, McCutcheon uses a Pioneer meter and computer, although he says he no longer studies his power files, thanks to six years of working with coach Bart Bowen. "For me, it's more of a listen to your body thing," he said. "I don't even look at my power files, I just send them to Bart. That's a real blessing. Makes training a lot simpler. Not stressing out or overthinking it. Just going day by day on what's in TrainingPeaks [meaning workouts that have been prescribed by Bowen]."

For a closer look at McCutcheon's bike, check out the gallery above.