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Adidas debuts 3D-printed sunglasses

Adidas 3D CMPT
(Image credit: Adidas)

Sportswear giant Adidas is bringing a novel concept to the sports eyewear market, unveiling a pair of 3D-printed sunglasses. The exclusive 3D CMPT sunnies feature a hollow, honeycomb-like frame, and were created in collaboration with eyewear company Marcolin.

They're constructed from a hollow and flexible nylon structure, and weigh only 20g, and are said to be suited to both sport and everyday use. 

While the best cycling sunglasses seem to be getting bigger and bigger in profile, these ones from Adidas retain a more traditional look. They aren't cycling-specific but generally branded to be used for sport. 

Adidas hasn't yet said why it chose to make a pair of 3D-printed sunglasses, or indeed where the inspiration came from.

Adidas 3D CMPT

The 3D CMPT features a hollow design and weighs only 20g (Image credit: Adidas)

Late last year, Adidas returned to making cycling shoes, suggesting a return to performance recycling products with the Adidas Road Shoe, before switching focus to the commuter market launching the SPD-pedal compatible Velosamba. It would certainly be neat if the company put more of an emphasis on producing cycling gear in the future. Adidas does own Five Ten, after all, known to make some of the best mountain bike shoes around. 

The 3D-printed sunglasses have a love-it-or-hate-it design, but if you love them, you're going to have to act fast. Only 150 pairs are being produced, and you have to be a member of Adidas' Creative Club to get your hands on them. The glasses will drop online on 23 August, at Adidas.com, and we anticipate they'll sell out pretty quickly.

They won't be cheap, though, and a pair will run for £300 / $415 / €350.

Ryan Simonovich has been riding and racing for nearly a decade. He got his start as a cross-country mountain bike racer in California and quickly learned how fun road cycling can be. He has dabbled in road, criterium and cyclocross racing as well. He lives in Durango, Colorado, where there are endless mountain views and hilly gravel routes.