Skip to main content

Luke Rowe's Tour de France Pinarello Dogma K8-S

Image 1 of 14

Pinarello rolled out its new Dogma K8-S at the spring classics this year

Pinarello rolled out its new Dogma K8-S at the spring classics this year (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 2 of 14

Luke Rowe's Pinarello Dogma K8-S with elastomer suspension for stage 4 of the Tour de France will be basically what he ran at Paris-Roubaix this year, where he finished 8th this year

Luke Rowe's Pinarello Dogma K8-S with elastomer suspension for stage 4 of the Tour de France will be basically what he ran at Paris-Roubaix this year, where he finished 8th this year (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 3 of 14

Most teams fasten number plates to a holder braced on the rear brake. Team Sky uses this solution

Most teams fasten number plates to a holder braced on the rear brake. Team Sky uses this solution (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 4 of 14

Each rider has a main race bike and two back-ups. This is Rowe's primary machine for stage 4

Each rider has a main race bike and two back-ups. This is Rowe's primary machine for stage 4 (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 5 of 14

K-Edge Garmin mounts are fairly common now in the pro peloton

K-Edge Garmin mounts are fairly common now in the pro peloton (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 6 of 14

Team Sky mechanics use a few small drops of glue underneath the bar tape at the ends to keep things tidy with a minimum of finishing tape

Team Sky mechanics use a few small drops of glue underneath the bar tape at the ends to keep things tidy with a minimum of finishing tape (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 7 of 14

Di2 sprint shifters control the rear derailleur. While they can be programmed to shift either derailleur in either direction, the typical setup is the left button moving the rear derailleur into an easier gear, and the right button dropping the chain down into a harder gear

Di2 sprint shifters control the rear derailleur. While they can be programmed to shift either derailleur in either direction, the typical setup is the left button moving the rear derailleur into an easier gear, and the right button dropping the chain down into a harder gear (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 8 of 14

Team Sky measures and labels each of the PRO stems, which, it turns out, seldom come in exact 10mm increments

Team Sky measures and labels each of the PRO stems, which, it turns out, seldom come in exact 10mm increments (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 9 of 14

We have seen two kinds of Stages prototype power meters recently, but Rowe has a standard model on his left crank

We have seen two kinds of Stages prototype power meters recently, but Rowe has a standard model on his left crank (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 10 of 14

Shimano Di2 shifting is pretty close to faultless, but on the cobbles a little extra security of a K-Edge chain catcher isn't a bad thing

Shimano Di2 shifting is pretty close to faultless, but on the cobbles a little extra security of a K-Edge chain catcher isn't a bad thing (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 11 of 14

Grip tape on the water bottle cages offers a little more security over the stones

Grip tape on the water bottle cages offers a little more security over the stones (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 12 of 14

Each elastomer-suspension system is measured and marked on Team Sky bikes

Each elastomer-suspension system is measured and marked on Team Sky bikes (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 13 of 14

FMB 27mm Paris-Roubaix tubulars are handmade specifically for the cobbles

FMB 27mm Paris-Roubaix tubulars are handmade specifically for the cobbles (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)
Image 14 of 14

Like every rider on Team Sky, Rowe's saddle is marked for exact measurement by mechanics

Like every rider on Team Sky, Rowe's saddle is marked for exact measurement by mechanics (Image credit: Courtesy Castelli)

This article originally appeared on BikeRadar

With all British fans' eyes on Bradley Wiggins at Paris-Roubaix this year, it was his Team Sky teammate Luke Rowe who rode to the better finish, coming eighth in the Roubaix velodrome at the Hell of the North.

On Tuesday, the Tour de France will tackle a number of pavé sectors on stage four, and Rowe and many others will be racing the same bikes and the same style of wide tubulars they used back in April.

The 25-year-old will be riding the Pinarello Dogma K8-S elastomer-suspended frameset that the Italian company launched this year at the spring classics. The DSS1.0 elastomer suspension system gives the rear wheel 10mm of vertical travel.

Just as important are the plump FMB tubulars handmade just for the event.

Digital details are rounded out by a Stages power meter, Shimano Di2 shifting — including sprint shifters — and a Garmin Edge GPS computer.

Check out all his mechanical details below, and click through the gallery for a closer look at the bike Rowe will use in support of team leader Chris Froome for the cobbles of stage four of the Tour de France.