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Pro bikes of Milan-San Remo

By:
John Whitney, Procycling
Published:
March 23, 2011, 22:03 GMT,
Updated:
March 23, 2011, 22:04 GMT
Race:
Milan-San Remo

Just before the pros set off on the epic 298km Milan-San Remo, BikeRadar took a look at some of the bikes that would help take them there.

One of the more eye catching was the Cervélo S3 of Thor Hushovd (Garmin-Cervélo), newly decorated in recognition of his win at the World Road Race Championships in Australia last year. The Norwegian rider's Milan-San Remo was wrecked, however, when a crash 90km from the finish left him with a badly bruised hip and a broken front wheel.

Fabian Cancellara's Trek Madone 6.9 SSL

Fabian Cancellara's Trek Madone 6.9 SSL. Photo: John Whitney

Above is eventual runner-up Fabian Cancellara's Trek Madone 6.9 SSL. He is riding for the newly formed Luxembourg outfit Leopard Trek after leaving Danish squad Saxo Bank with the Schleck brothers at the end of the 2010 season. He lost out in the sprint at San Remo to HTC-Highroad's Matthew Goss, who was riding Specialized's new McLaren Venge in its professional race debut.

The irony may not have been lost on Cancellara, who would have been on the same bike as Goss had he still been with the Danish team.

 Matthew Goss' winning Specialized McLaren Venge

Matthew Goss' winning Specialized McLaren Venge. Photo: John Whitney

Speaking of which, here is HTC-Highroad rider Matt Goss's winning Specialized McLaren Venge. It features Shimano and PRO kit, an SRM power measuring system, HED wheels mounted with Continental tubulars and a Fi'zi:k saddle. It might be the last time we see this particular bike, as in future the bikes of HTC-Highroad will be painted in team colours.

Bradley Wiggins Pinarello Dogma 60.1

Bradley Wiggins Pinarello Dogma 60.1. Photo: John Whitney

Bradley Wiggins' Pinarello Dogma 60.1 also attracted our gaze, partly for its Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 and partly for its non-standard O.Symetric chainrings. Wiggins has used these for a few years, and is one of a few pros to do so.

The chainring's varying diameter is supposed to increase power output for the same perceived effort by producing a higher gear on the downstroke where a rider usually has more power. We didn't see too many of these around on Saturday, but it obviously suits the Team Sky rider.

To see more pro bikes from Milan-San Remo, check out the gallery.

This article first appeared on Bikeradar here.

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