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SRAM debuts trick PinDome cassette for X.0 family

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Like on XX's X-Dome cassette, the upcoming XG-1080 PinDome cassette uses an aluminum innermost cog to transfer load to the freehub body.

Like on XX's X-Dome cassette, the upcoming XG-1080 PinDome cassette uses an aluminum innermost cog to transfer load to the freehub body.
(Image credit: James Huang)
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Coming later this year is the remarkably clever XG-1080 PinDome cassette, which uses high-strength steel pins to join the outer edges of each cog together. The resultant structure approaches XX weight-wise but is expected to run quieter and be even more resistant to mud.

Coming later this year is the remarkably clever XG-1080 PinDome cassette, which uses high-strength steel pins to join the outer edges of each cog together. The resultant structure approaches XX weight-wise but is expected to run quieter and be even more resistant to mud.
(Image credit: James Huang)
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Cog bending will be virtually impossible on the new XG-1080 cassette as each cog is supported around its entire circumference with steel pins.

Cog bending will be virtually impossible on the new XG-1080 cassette as each cog is supported around its entire circumference with steel pins.
(Image credit: James Huang)
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The steel pin construction of the upcoming XG-1080 cassette leaves gobs of room for drivetrain-clogging mud to pass through.

The steel pin construction of the upcoming XG-1080 cassette leaves gobs of room for drivetrain-clogging mud to pass through.
(Image credit: James Huang)

SRAM's new X.0 'family' will include a previously unannounced surprise: the clever XG-1080 'PinDome' cassette that mimics XX's incredibly light and trick X-Dome machined construction but at a far lower price point.

Like XX, the XG-1080 cassette uses a skeletonized dome-like construction but instead of being milled from a single chunk of chromoly steel (a precise but very expensive process), each cog is individually stamped in conventional fashion then pressed together with its adjacent neighbors with a varying number of short high-strength steel pins.

As a result, XG-1080 is still impressively light with a target weight of just 235g – just 11g more than Shimano XTR, which currently has one fewer cog and uses lighter but faster-wearing titanium. More critically, though, each cog is fully supported around its full circumference, reducing cog flex to virtually nil for faster and more reliable shifting and virtually eliminating the possibility of bent gears.

Like XX, torque is transferred to the freehub body via an aluminum innermost cog and the smallest cog will remain a separate bit. Planned gear ratios include 11-32T and 11-36T options.

Consumers won't be able to buy an XG-1080 cassette until around August but once they're available, pricing will be quite reasonable all things considered: just US$200 as compared to the only marginally lighter XX, which goes for nearly US$350. In addition, XG-1080's stamped cogs are expected to run more quietly, too.