Skip to main content

Simac Ladies Tour reveal route for six-day race in August

Women's WorldTour
Women's WorldTour (Image credit: Getty Images)

The 23rd edition of the Simac Ladies Tour, formerly known as the Boels Ladies Tour, has reveal the route details for the six stages set to take place from August 24-29. 

After being postponed and then cancelled last year due to COVID-19, organisers are hopeful that the race will move ahead with appropriate measures in place during  the six days of racing. However, has been reported that a shortage in motorcycle police could lead to organisers having to alter the event.

“The Simac Ladies Tour is a transfer activity that can be compared to a fun fair or market. A cycling race is characterized by the public who is watching in their own street or village, the 1.5 meter distance is guaranteed over 95 per cent of the course," said Thijs Rondhuis of Courage Events.

"A lot of people usually come together for the team presentation, start, finish and ceremony. We are in talks with all the municipalities involved to take appropriate measures at those locations.

"You can think of moving a start or finish outside the built-up area or closing off the area and allowing the public to enter there. We have a plan ready for each stage that is discussed with the municipalities involved.

"We assume that we can eventually arrive at a scenario in which all involved mayors of the eight start and finish municipalities can give their approval."

It is the biggest stage race in the Netherlands, joining the Women’s WorldTour in 2017, and it is heading into its 23rd edition. 

Organisers annually welcome the top women’s teams to compete in six days of late-August racing. Former winners include Leontien van Moorsel, Petra Rosner, Kristin Armstrong, Annemiek van Vleuten, to name a few, while Marianne Vos has won the overall title four times. Christine Majerus won the last edition held in 2019.

The 2020 edition of the stage race was cancelled due to COVID-19. The UCI announced a revised calendar for the Women’s WorldTour last May, after the season had been halted due to the pandemic. The event was initially scheduled for August but was moved to the first week of September. Organisers had to cancel the  event altogether after local municipalities would not grant permits for the six-day event due to health restrictions.

The Simac Ladies Tour will returned this August as part of the Women's WorldTour to once again welcome a world-class field. The race will cover a total of 584 kilometres that includes flat stages, an individual time trial and two selective stages.

The Simac Ladies Tour starts with a 2.4km prologue in Ede on August 24 where the winner will take the first leader's jersey.

Stage 2 is a 134.4km flat race from Zwolle to Hardenberg, likely to see a sprint. Stage 3 will surely shake up the overall classification with a 22.2km time trial in Gennep. Stage 3 brings the peloton to a 125.9km race from Stramproy to Weert for another anticipated bunch sprint.

After four relatively flat stages, the race offers two selective closings stages.  The penultimate stage 5 will be 148.9km from Geleen to Sweikhuizen and the concluding stage 6 is 150.3km from Arnhem to Posbank where the overall winner of the Simac Ladies Tour will emerge.

The route

  • Prologue Ede, ITT,  2.4km
  • Stage 1: Zwolle to Hardenberg, 134.4km
  • Stage 2: Gennep, ITT, 22.2km
  • Stage 3: Stramproy to Weert, 125.9km
  • Stage 4: Geleen to Sweikhuizen, 148.9km
  • Stage 5: Arnhem to Posbank, 150.3km
Kirsten Frattini

Kirsten Frattini is an honours graduate of Kinesiology and Health Science from York University in Toronto, Canada. She has been involved in bike racing from the grassroots level to professional cycling's WorldTour. She has worked in both print and digital publishing, and started with Cyclingnews as a North American Correspondent in 2006. Moving into a Production Editor's role in 2014, she produces and publishes international race coverage for all cycling disciplines, edits news and writes features. Currently the Women's Editor at Cyclingnews, Kirsten coordinates global coverage of races, news, features and podcasts about women's professional cycling.