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LIMITS: World's most universally compatible power meter?

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LIMITS simply threads into the left-hand crank arm,a concept that widely opens up compatibility

LIMITS simply threads into the left-hand crank arm,a concept that widely opens up compatibility (Image credit: Courtesy (YouTube video))
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Installation is said to be the easiest on the market

Installation is said to be the easiest on the market (Image credit: Courtesy)
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Encased in a CNC-machined CroMoly steel housing, the device is said to be sturdy enough for mountain biking

Encased in a CNC-machined CroMoly steel housing, the device is said to be sturdy enough for mountain biking (Image credit: Courtesy)

This article first appeared on BikeRadar

The power meter market has been blowing up over the last couple of years, with the likes of Stages Cycling and then 4iii pushing the price boundaries and creating a surge in affordable training devices. Having just launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo, UK-based startup LIMITS looks to be the cheapest and most universally compatible power meter yet.

With a CNC machined CroMoly housing, LIMITS is a 47g left-based power meter that works by threading in between a standard 9/16in pedal and crank. This simple design means that LIMITS claims absolute compatibility with all standard pedal systems (more on this later) and cranks – regardless of mountain bike or road. Further to this, the outward placement of the meter ensures there’s no chance of interference from tightly-spaced frame designs.

The LIMITS will be available in black or silver

How do you install a pedal that needs a hex key?

Another concern we're awaiting clarification on is actual pedal compatibility. From the company’s video, it looks as though the LIMITS's meter is tightened from the back of the crank arm, which would render many higher-end pedals –which require a hex-key for installation – useless. Of course, lower end Shimano pedals and all Speedplay pedals that use a 15mm open spanner will work without issue.

Lastly, LIMITS' claims the unit is up to the task of mountain biking, but looking at the ends of a crank arm on a well-used mountain bike should raise the question on how well the unit will be able to withstand semi-regular direct knocks.

Find out more at the LIMITS Indiegogo page.