Skip to main content

Specialized gets its carbon dirty

Image 1 of 39

New carbon front triangle

New carbon front triangle
Image 2 of 39

Just add a few wraps

Just add a few wraps
Image 3 of 39

Lots of carbon fiber

Lots of carbon fiber
Image 4 of 39

Heavily reinforced front end

Heavily reinforced front end
Image 5 of 39

The new Brain Fade feature

The new Brain Fade feature
Image 6 of 39

Who says hardtails are dead?

Who says hardtails are dead?
Image 7 of 39

Cross season

Cross season
Image 8 of 39

S-bend seatstays

S-bend seatstays
Image 9 of 39

Lots of carbon fiber

Lots of carbon fiber
Image 10 of 39

Asymmetric chainstays

Asymmetric chainstays
Image 11 of 39

As with the Epic

As with the Epic
Image 12 of 39

Heavily reinforced front end

Heavily reinforced front end
Image 13 of 39

It almost looks too pretty

It almost looks too pretty
Image 14 of 39

The Brain unit

The Brain unit
Image 15 of 39

Cross season

Cross season
Image 16 of 39

The flattened underside

The flattened underside
Image 17 of 39

S-bend seatstays

S-bend seatstays
Image 18 of 39

Massive fork crown

Massive fork crown
Image 19 of 39

New carbon front triangle and asymmetric M5 aluminum rear triangle are lighter and stiffer than last year’s all-aluminum model. All 2006 Epics also gain 10mm of rear wheel travel for a total of 100mm.

New carbon front triangle and asymmetric M5 aluminum rear triangle are lighter and stiffer than last year’s all-aluminum model. All 2006 Epics also gain 10mm of rear wheel travel for a total of 100mm. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 20 of 39

Just add a few wraps of carbon fiber, apply a little heat…

Just add a few wraps of carbon fiber, apply a little heat… (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 21 of 39

Lots of carbon fiber reinforces the bottom bracket area to insure immediate pedaling response.

Lots of carbon fiber reinforces the bottom bracket area to insure immediate pedaling response. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 22 of 39

Heavily reinforced front end provides excellent lateral and torsional frame rigidity when cranking on the bars. 2006 marks the first instance of integrated headsets for Specialized’s mountain frames.

Heavily reinforced front end provides excellent lateral and torsional frame rigidity when cranking on the bars. 2006 marks the first instance of integrated headsets for Specialized’s mountain frames. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 23 of 39

Asymmetric chainstays reduce weight by allowing the non-driveside stay to take a more direct path to the rear axle.

Asymmetric chainstays reduce weight by allowing the non-driveside stay to take a more direct path to the rear axle. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 24 of 39

US consumers may opt for a rim brake-equipped Carbon Epic. The braking obviously isn’t as good as disc-equipped models, but few will deny the weight savings of rim brakes.

US consumers may opt for a rim brake-equipped Carbon Epic. The braking obviously isn’t as good as disc-equipped models, but few will deny the weight savings of rim brakes. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 25 of 39

Specialized uses carbon fiber for one of the suspension linkages as well. Face it, you can never have too much carbon!

Specialized uses carbon fiber for one of the suspension linkages as well. Face it, you can never have too much carbon! (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 26 of 39

It almost looks too pretty to beat up on an all-day epic or 24 hour event…. note that I said “almost”.

It almost looks too pretty to beat up on an all-day epic or 24 hour event…. note that I said “almost”. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 27 of 39

As with the Epic the asymmetric rear end of the Stumpjumper makes for a lighter and stiff rear end.

As with the Epic the asymmetric rear end of the Stumpjumper makes for a lighter and stiff rear end. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 28 of 39

The Brain unit on the Stumpjumper FSR is remotely connected to the main shock. In order to function properly, the Brain needs to be mounted nearly vertical and as close to the rear wheel axle as possible. Mission accomplished.

The Brain unit on the Stumpjumper FSR is remotely connected to the main shock. In order to function properly, the Brain needs to be mounted nearly vertical and as close to the rear wheel axle as possible. Mission accomplished. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 29 of 39

Apparently nothing was deemed over the top for Specialized premier full-suspension XC/Endurance bike. Check out the carbon fiber mount for the Brain unit.

Apparently nothing was deemed over the top for Specialized premier full-suspension XC/Endurance bike. Check out the carbon fiber mount for the Brain unit. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 30 of 39

The Stumpjumper linkage is forged from magnesium as opposed to the carbon unit on the Epic. Dramatically swoopy carbon fiber design work is evident just about everywhere. Hydraulic hose running from the main shock routes oil out back to the remote Brain unit.

The Stumpjumper linkage is forged from magnesium as opposed to the carbon unit on the Epic. Dramatically swoopy carbon fiber design work is evident just about everywhere. Hydraulic hose running from the main shock routes oil out back to the remote Brain unit. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 31 of 39

The new Brain Fade feature softens the “on-off” feel of previous Epics. Adjustments are easily performed using the large machined and anodized aluminum dial.

The new Brain Fade feature softens the “on-off” feel of previous Epics. Adjustments are easily performed using the large machined and anodized aluminum dial. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 32 of 39

Who says hardtails are dead? Sure, they may not be the best tool for the job all the time, but there are certainly still times when only the lightest and most efficient will do.

Who says hardtails are dead? Sure, they may not be the best tool for the job all the time, but there are certainly still times when only the lightest and most efficient will do. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 33 of 39

Externally-bonded dropouts make for better stress distribution to the seatstay. Plus they look cool!

Externally-bonded dropouts make for better stress distribution to the seatstay. Plus they look cool! (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 34 of 39

And who says aluminum hardtails are dead! Aluminum still makes for efficient, lightweight structures that usually won’t (totally) break the bank. Specialized certainly hasn’t given up on these, and neither should you.

And who says aluminum hardtails are dead! Aluminum still makes for efficient, lightweight structures that usually won’t (totally) break the bank. Specialized certainly hasn’t given up on these, and neither should you. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 35 of 39

This definitely goes into the “why didn’t anyone think of this before?” category. Asymmetric seatstay design reduces weight and complexity of symmetric designs.

This definitely goes into the “why didn’t anyone think of this before?” category. Asymmetric seatstay design reduces weight and complexity of symmetric designs. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 36 of 39

Cross season is coming sooner than you think…

Cross season is coming sooner than you think… (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 37 of 39

The flattened underside of the Tricross top tube adds a bit of vertical compliance to the frame but also makes for comfortable shouldering during runups.

The flattened underside of the Tricross top tube adds a bit of vertical compliance to the frame but also makes for comfortable shouldering during runups. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 38 of 39

S-bend seatstays on the Tricross have plenty of mud clearance and just a little bit of vertical give.

S-bend seatstays on the Tricross have plenty of mud clearance and just a little bit of vertical give. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 39 of 39

Massive fork crown isn’t quite as visibly offensive as it appears in the picture, but it does make for tons of mud clearance. Zertz units just around the cantilever bosses smooth out the ride and kill brake chatter that can sometimes be found with lightweight carbon cross forks.

Massive fork crown isn’t quite as visibly offensive as it appears in the picture, but it does make for tons of mud clearance. Zertz units just around the cantilever bosses smooth out the ride and kill brake chatter that can sometimes be found with lightweight carbon cross forks. (Image credit: James Huang)

no copy in legacy cms

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month*

Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

after your trial you will be billed £4.99 $7.99 €5.99 per month, cancel anytime. Or sign up for one year for just £49 $79 €59

Join now for unlimited access

Try your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1