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Pro bike: Johan Vansummeren's Cervélo R5

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Johan Vansummeren is often the tallest rider in any peloton at 197cm tall, but wraps his frame around a 58cm Cervélo R5

Johan Vansummeren is often the tallest rider in any peloton at 197cm tall, but wraps his frame around a 58cm Cervélo R5 (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Cervélo's 2015 paint finish has a subtle complementary colour for the brand logo

Cervélo's 2015 paint finish has a subtle complementary colour for the brand logo (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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A 20cm head tube and minimalist Di2 cabled look

A 20cm head tube and minimalist Di2 cabled look (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Vansummeren's reach is catered for by an aluminium 140mm -17 degree 3T ARX Team stem

Vansummeren's reach is catered for by an aluminium 140mm -17 degree 3T ARX Team stem (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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3T's Rotundo carbon bars have a classic bend, still much favoured by pro riders

3T's Rotundo carbon bars have a classic bend, still much favoured by pro riders (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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A very generous helping of 27.2mm 3T carbon seatpost

A very generous helping of 27.2mm 3T carbon seatpost (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Fizik's Antares is Johan's saddle of choice

Fizik's Antares is Johan's saddle of choice (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Cervélo's trademark neat slim seatstays give just enough room for a name sticker

Cervélo's trademark neat slim seatstays give just enough room for a name sticker (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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The R5's giant BBRight bottom bracket area soundly anchors the down tube asymmetric seat tube and chainstays

The R5's giant BBRight bottom bracket area soundly anchors the down tube asymmetric seat tube and chainstays (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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The chunky CNC'ed Rotor alloy chain catcher stands out

The chunky CNC'ed Rotor alloy chain catcher stands out (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Vansummeren uses lengthy 180mm Rotor 3D cranks, fitted with an SRM power meter and 53/39 elliptical Rotor Q Rings

Vansummeren uses lengthy 180mm Rotor 3D cranks, fitted with an SRM power meter and 53/39 elliptical Rotor Q Rings (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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As he has an SRM power meter, Vansummeren's Garmin Vector pedals are fitted minus their battery and accelerometer pods

As he has an SRM power meter, Vansummeren's Garmin Vector pedals are fitted minus their battery and accelerometer pods (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Slim carbon hub shells and aerodynamic spoke flanges on Mavic's 40c wheelset

Slim carbon hub shells and aerodynamic spoke flanges on Mavic's 40c wheelset (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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A larger carbon hub body for the rear hub, and an 11-28t cassette

A larger carbon hub body for the rear hub, and an 11-28t cassette (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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Mavic's SSC 40C rims are wider than most of the French company's line up, and here have some duck tape to prevent valve rattle, and Mavic's Yksion Grip Link tubulars…

Mavic's SSC 40C rims are wider than most of the French company's line up, and here have some duck tape to prevent valve rattle, and Mavic's Yksion Grip Link tubulars… (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)
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…except they may not be what they seem. Heat stamped as 22mm Mavic tubulars, the tread pattern and width look very much like a 25mm Veloflex

…except they may not be what they seem. Heat stamped as 22mm Mavic tubulars, the tread pattern and width look very much like a 25mm Veloflex (Image credit: Robin Wilmott / Future Publishing)

This article originally appeared on BikeRadar

One of the tallest riders in any race, 33-year-old Johan Vansummeren's (Garmin-Sharp) 197cm (6'5") frame manages to fit on to a stock 58cm Cervélo R5 frame. The frame's construction is unchanged from last season, but this glossy graphite and red paint finish is all new for the 2014 Tour de France, and should be available to buy in 2015.

The lofty Belgian’s role at the Tour will be as a rouleur to help protect team leader Andrew Talansky on the flat stages, and especially during stage 5 over the Roubaix cobbles, which were the scene of his greatest personal victory. The team brought Cervélo's R3 mud bike for stage 5, but otherwise the R5 is Van Summeren's chosen daily workhorse.

Even in a large size, the R5 is still very light, but the necessarily upscaled parts together increase the overall weight to 7.33kg / 16.15lb. A tiller-like 140mm stem, 180mm cranks and lengthy seatpost all contribute, added to the SRM power-measuring gauge and head unit, plus Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 transmission all boost the mass. Mavic's 40C carbon tubular wheelset is light, wide and stable, and shod with 25mm tubulars that bear a Mavic heat stamp, although they're rebadged Veloflex models, which isn’t a new practice among pro teams.

Van Summeren favours Rotor’s ovalised 53/39 Q-Rings on his super-long 3D cranks, incorporating an SRM power meter, and adds Rotor's chain catcher too for security. With an SRM on board, the Garmin Vector pedals are shorn of their battery-and-accelerometer pods, and the team use the Garmin Edge 810 or new Edge 1000 head units to display their onboard data.

3T supply a 140mm –17 degree stem, which although very long by amateur standards, isn't unusual in the pro peloton (BMC's Michael Schar requires a 150mm version). Classically curved 3T Rotundo bars and a Fizik Antares-topped Dorico seatpost with 25mm setback complete a workmanlike professional setup.

180mm cranks, oval Q Rings and an SRM go along with Garmin Vector pedals that aren't used as the power meter

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