Best bike bells 2022 - for commuting, road riding, mountain biking and more

A close up of a silver Spurcycle Original bell, mounted to a silver handlebar, on which a white person's hands resting and slightly blurred
(Image credit: Spurcycle)

The best bike bells are the perfect way to alert others to your presence. That will help you to ride more safely in traffic, in cities and out on trails where there may be others out on foot, on bikes or on horses.

Many cyclists find bells off-putting because of their look - but the latest crop of bike bell technology includes some impressive little contraptions, many of which can almost hide behind a cable or under a handlebar. Just like the best road bike helmets, bells help increase cycling safety, both for the rider themselves and for surrounding pedestrians. It's surprising how often people on foot don't hear a bike coming up behind them, even if the rider is calling out to alert them to their approach.

If you're riding a bike with flat handlebars, it's usually easy to find the best position to mount a bell for usability while riding. Drop bar bikes can be a bit trickier due to their multiple hand positions, but there are bike bells that are designed to work well here too.

You can find expensive and shiny bike bells with a retro look, or small thumb pieces that give a little ring. Most of the best bike bells give a sound that's loud and shrill enough to let people on foot know you're there though. There are even bike horns, which are loud enough for cars to hear, and to alert others as you're speeding down a mountain bike trail. 

Although you can pay a lot for the best bike bells with premium designs, there are many others that are inexpensive, so whether you want something sleek and covert for your best road bike, or something retro and cute for your best commuter bike, there's going to be something for you. To help you find the right bell for your needs, we’ve put together a list of the best bells for cycling. At the bottom of the page, there's also a buyer's guide to what to consider when buying a bell.

Best bike bells available today

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(Image credit: Trigger Bell by Arcalas Ltd)

Trigger Bell

Best placed bell for safety and convenience

Specifications

Noise: Medium-loud
Weight: 26g
Colour: Black
Size: 4.6 x 3.2 x 2.5 cm

Reasons to buy

+
Convenient placement
+
Safety-focused
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound is not as strong when wet

Fitting on the left-hand hood of drop bars, this affordable brass bell is meant to increase safety as much as it is meant to make noise. Great for trail-riding, city streets, or busy cycle paths, the Trigger Bell is said to improve ride safety, as well as be small and discrete. It doesn’t have to go on your hoods either – the mount is meant to fit 20-40mm handlebars, and can be fitted on your drops or even flat bars.

(Image credit: BONMIXC)

Bonmixc Bike Bell Brass Mini

Best for affordability and ease of use

Specifications

Noise: Clear, loud, double-ding
Weight: 47g
Colours: Silver, gold
Size : Unlisted (it's small)

Reasons to buy

+
Easy-to-use mount
+
Great sound
+
Low price

Reasons to avoid

-
Small mount won't fit wider bars

The Bonmixc Bike Bell is an Amazon best-seller for good reason. At a relatively low price point, the bell does its job well, while also being convenient and aesthetically simple. Its double-ding noise is plenty loud to alert pedestrians, and it can be installed in under a minute. While it can be installed on either the left or right side of your handlebars, the mount can only fit handlebars with an outer diameter of 21-23mm, making it unsuitable for bikes with thicker handlebars.

(Image credit: Spurcycle)

Spurcycle Original Vintage Bell

Best bell for looks but with a top-dollar price tag

Specifications

Noise: Loud, high-quality
Weight: 45g
Colours: Black, silver, brass
Size : 2.5cm high x 3cm across

Reasons to buy

+
Variable fit
+
Old-school look
+
Noise quality

Reasons to avoid

-
High price
-
Mount can scrape on bar

There are few bells we’ve encountered that are as impressive as the Spurcycle Original Vintage Bell. The bell has a small footprint, vintage design, and fits in a variety of positions and styles. Ringing at close to 100 decibels, the bell can even be heard by drivers or pedestrians in a crowded city. The only limits of the Spurcycle are in its mounts – there are just two available (made for 31.8mm and 22.2mm handlebars) – which can scrape your bars. While many may be put off by the price tag, those who can afford it will enjoy a top-quality bell that works as impressively as it looks.

(Image credit: Timber! Mountain Bike Bells)

Timber! Mountain Bike Trail Bell

Best mountain bike bell that can also be used in and around town

Specifications

Noise: Continuous cow-bell (can be turned off)
Weight : 69g
Colours: black
Size: Unlisted (mount + cowbell)

Reasons to buy

+
Built for MTB
+
Continuous noise option
+
Stable on handlebars

Reasons to avoid

-
A bit bulky
-
Heavier than others

Designed specifically for mountain biking and trail riding, the Timber! Mountain Bike Trail Bell makes a continuous chiming noise that can easily be turned on or off. Its unique design is convenient for mountain bike riders and those on busy paths because you won’t have to constantly be moving your hand or thumb to ring the bell. Instead, the unit operates on its own, leaving you free to safely shred the trails while still alerting others of your presence.

(Image credit: https://lionbellworks.co.uk/)

Lion Urban

Best for looks, build and sound quality

Specifications

Noise: Loud ding, lasts 20 seconds
Weight: Unlisted
Colours: Brass
Size : 55mm in diameter

Reasons to buy

+
Good-looking
+
Loud
+
High-quality materials

Reasons to avoid

-
Quite pricey

A classic bike bell taken right out of the 19th century, the Lion Urban is as much a piece of art as it is a bike bell. The ‘ding’ sound is loud, and lasts up to 20 seconds, making it perfect for city riding. Made of corrosion-resistant nickel silver the Lion bell has a classy look in either gloss or brushed satin finish. There are a few different sizes of stainless steel mounts for your handlebars or stem, and you can even have the bell custom-engraved.

(Image credit: Firmstrong)

Firmstrong Classic Bicycle Bell

A great, big bell option for cruiser bikes for adults and kids

Specifications

Noise: Loud chime
Weight: 1.6oz
Colours: Many, including blue, chrome, black, white, red, yellow, and more
Size: 9.3 x 7.4 x 1.2 inches

Reasons to buy

+
Noise is loud and clear
+
Good-looking design
+
Mount versatility

Reasons to avoid

-
Large, so takes up space
-
Pricey

This bell can do it all. Fitting on road bikes, mountain bikes, kids’ bikes, beach cruisers and more, the Firmstrong Classic Bike Bell is a great option for any cyclist. It’s a bit larger than other models on this list, so it won’t be as discrete (in case you’re trying to hide the fact that you have a bell on your road bike). You can choose from almost any colour, although the price tag will be offputting to some.

(Image credit: Bobbin)

Bobbin Embossed Ringer Bell

Best for a classic looking bell at an affordable price

Specifications

Noise: Ring ring
Weight: Unlisted
Colours: Silver, pink, yellow, "duck egg"
Size: 55mm in diameter

Reasons to buy

+
Retro look
+
Inexpensive
+
Simple

Reasons to avoid

-
Bulky

Unlike the higher-end bells above, the Bobbin Embossed Ringer Bell is a retro bell at a fraction of the price. It comes in a wide range of styles and colours, and fits easily onto a variety of bikes. Simplicity is key here, and these bells are perfect for commuters and first-time bell-buyers, although they may be a bit too big for road or mountain bike riders.

(Image credit: RockBros)

RockBros Handlebar Stainless Steel Bell

Best for versatility, style and affordability

Specifications

Noise: Loud
Weight: 47g
Colours: Black, silver, gold, copper, bronze
Size: 4.1 x 3.6 x 2.7cm

Reasons to buy

+
Value
+
Vintage look
+
One-size-fits-all mount

Reasons to avoid

-
Lever can be tricky to reach

The RockBros bell looks and feels similar to the Spurcycle Vintage Bell, but it costs only a fraction of the price. While Spurcycle leads the charge in terms of originality and quality, RockBros offers a valuable option in many different colours, and a one-size-fits-all mount that fits on just about any bike. The only downside is that the RockBros Bell’s lever may be hard to reach, making it better for adults than kids, and not the best for a high-speed or traffic-filled scenario.

(Image credit: RockBros)

RockBros Electronic Bicycle Horn/Bell

Best bike horn for maximum attention

Specifications

Noise: 90 decibels
Weight: 33g
Colours: Black, blue, red, green, purple
Size: 3.5cm x 3cm

Reasons to buy

+
Loud
+
Sleek
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Cost of replaceable battery

Moving away from bike bells for a minute, we have the RockBros Electronic Bike Horn. This small contraption is a beast and has three different tone levels that can be heard by car drivers and busy pedestrians. The unit is simple and easy to install, water-resistant, and comes with a replaceable lithium battery.

(Image credit: Nutcase)

Nutcase Thumbdinger Bell

Best for affordability and for users of all ages

Specifications

Noise: Polite
Weight: 27g
Colours: Black, orange, blue, green
Size: 92 x 125mm

Reasons to buy

+
Crisp sound
+
Small
+
Affordable

Reasons to avoid

-
Noise may be too quiet

Thumbdinger is actually quite a good description of the Nutcase Bell. Rather than a horn, ‘dong’, or loud ring, the Nutcase Thumbdinger is much more subtle. You can alert walkers on the cycle path without startling them, and they’re cheap enough to buy for the whole family. The bell is small and sleek, and can fit on a variety of adults' and kids' bikes.

The Lezyne Classic Shallow Brass Bell in gold on a white background

(Image credit: Lezyne)

Lezyne Classic Shallow Brass Bell

Best for portability

Specifications

Noise: Sonorous ding
Weight: 27g
Colours: Brass, black or brass mount
Size: Not specified

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to fit and take off the bars
+
Quality, long lasting ping sound

Reasons to avoid

-
May be tempting to thieves

Lezyne's shallow bell has a low profile mushroom shape and attaches to the bars with a rubber O-ring making it easy to fit and remove, although that's as true for an opportunist thief as for you so you're probably going to want to take it with you if you're parked up away from home.

It's operated by a simple spring pinger and gives a sound that's sonorous and long-lasting but sharp enough to get attention. There's a more compact, deeper sided option with a higher tone, which is also available with a screw-on mount to deter the light-fingered.

The Knog Oi bell in black on a white background

(Image credit: Knog)

Knog Oi Classic

Best for inconspicuous design

Specifications

Noise: Variety of pitches, long duration
Weight: 17g
Colours: Brass, copper, silver, black, special editions
Size: H: 16mm x W: 37mm x L:53mm

Reasons to buy

+
Low profile design
+
Long duration ring tone

Reasons to avoid

-
Need the right size to fit your bars

The Knog Oi bell has a design that wraps around your handlebars with a single bolt fixing, so it's low profile and unobtrusive, but it still gives a crisp, clear sound with a number of overtones and a long duration. It's operated with a pinger which you can position to suit, as the bell can be rotated around the bars.

The Oi comes in two sizes to fit either 22.2mm or 23.8mm to 31.8mm bars, so it will work for road bike drop bars as well as hybrids, BMX and kids' bikes. You can shim it out for narrower bars too. There's a Luxe version and limited editions in funky colours available.

How to choose the best bike bell

Now that we’ve covered the gamut of best bike bells and horns, let’s help you find the best one for you. There are a few things to consider when shopping for a bike bell, so let’s jump right in.

How loud should my bike bell be?

Depending on where you’re riding, you could need a friendly bell that’s just a reminder or a horn that alerts others to your presence. Either way, you’re going to want a bell that fits the location. In other words, don’t bring a 90db horn on a bike path or you’ll end up scaring a lot of people, but a quiet ding will be unheard in the noise of a busy city. Of course, if you’re shredding mountain bike trails or riding through city traffic, a loud horn is exactly what you need.

How much should I spend?

There are a few options on this list that cost 10 times' as much as others, so it’s worth keeping your budget in mind when shopping for a bike bell. The more expensive options are usually higher quality, made with better materials, and look a lot better. Functionally, they don't offer any more features than the cheaper options, but they are much more attractive and may have greater longevity.

Do I want my bell to be hidden or on show?

Do you want to hide your bike bell, or make it known? A few of the above bells stand out like a beacon, colourful orbs slapped on top of our handlebars. While other are slim and sleek, they fit right under or on top of the bars, and if you route your cables a certain way, it would be very hard to spot them. Casual commuters won’t mind the look of a bike bell, but others will want to keep it hidden on their local bunch ride.

Also be aware that a status symbol bell might attract a thief, so be careful if you're locking your bike up away from home and maybe consider something cheaper or a bell that's easily removeable and that you can take with you like the Lezyne.

Do I need to consider handlebar diameter?

Before making your final decision, make sure the bell you want fits on your bike’s handlebars. The bells and horns on this list all fit standard handlebars, but some are more limited than others and some like the Knog come in multiple sizes. If you’re shopping for a kid’s bike, make sure the mount is small enough to fit safely around their handlebars.

How durable are the best bike bells?

Bike bells can be cheap – less than £10/$10 as we’ve seen – but that means that some of them are replaceable. A cheap bell will not be made from top-quality materials, and so it won’t last as long if you’re using it for daily commutes in the rain. A more expensive bell made from steel or brass, for example, will cost a bit more upfront, but will likely last you a long time. If you’re shopping for kids, opt for the cheaper bell in case they break it. 

What's the best bike bell placement?

It's worth considering bell placement and usability when selecting a bell. If you're having to brake and steer at the same time as pinging your bell then one placed at the side of your stem will be awkward to use, while one that's close to the grips and brake levers will be a lot more practical.

That's particularly true with drop bar bikes, where you might have your hands in multiple different positions on the bars. If you regularly brake from the tops of the brake levers or ride in the drops then finding a bell that works for you might be difficult. You also don't want a bell that takes up too much bar real estate and stops you using parts of the bars for your hands, lights or other accessories.


Zach is a freelance writer, the head of ZNehr Coaching, and an elite-level rider in road, track, and e-racing. He writes about everything cycling-related, from buyer's guides to product reviews and feature articles to power analyses. After earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise Science at Marian University-Indianapolis, Zach discovered a passion for writing that soon turned into a full-fledged career. In between articles, Zach spends his time working with endurance athletes of all abilities and ages at ZNehr Coaching. After entering the sport at age 17, Zach went on to have a wonderful road racing career that included winning the 2017 Collegiate National Time Trial Championships and a 9th place finish at the 2019 US Pro National Time Trial Championships. Nowadays, Zach spends most of his ride time indoors with NeXT eSport.

With contributions from