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Best bike multi-tools 2022 – Get brilliant roadside repair with these multi-tools

A close up of someone's hands using a multi tool to split a chain
(Image credit: Topeak)

Whether you're tightening a rattling bottle cage, raising your saddle a little, plugging a tubeless tyre or fixing a broken chain, the best bike multi-tools can save you a lot of frustration, not to mention the ever-embarrassing ‘can you come and pick me up’ phone call. Having the wrong multi-tool, on the other hand, can mean rounded-out bolts, a few too many expletives uttered in a public space, and a humiliating ride home.  

The best bike multi-tools come in all shapes and sizes, some packing in nearly a workshop's worth of equipment, while others are lightweight and minimalist with only the bare essentials. Finding the right balance between size and functionality is critical and making sure you always pack your multi-tool, alongside your best bike pump, will help you to remain self-sufficient on your rides.

They aren't meant to be the main tools in your toolbox; they are there for small adjustments, perhaps when testing out new components or experimenting with seat heights, and for unexpected emergencies. Still, you don't want a poorly machined tool to strip the heads of your fixings, so the best bike multi-tools, while using lightweight materials for the body, are likely to use strengthened steel for the parts that interact with the bike.  

That said, different cyclists have different needs – a commuter may want a simple tool that quickly and robustly adjusts a wheel nut, while a road cyclist with a carbon frame worth thousands is more concerned about applying the correct torque to adjust their seat post. We've got you covered on both accounts, and everything in between. 

Read on for our pick of the best bike multi-tools our tech team reach for on the way out the door for a ride. Plus, if you're not sure which multi-tool is best for you, then scroll to the bottom of the page for our guide on how to choose the right one for you.

Taken a liking to fixing your bike yourself? Be sure to also check out our roundup of the best torque wrenches and the best bike repair stands and, finally, don't miss out on our home maintenance tips to reduce repair costs, which covers everything from tyre pressure to brake pad wear.

The best bike multi-tools available today

Topeak Mini PT30 multi tool with separate chain tool and black case

(Image credit: Guy Kesteven)
Bike-repair gold in a simple fold-out package

Specifications

Allen: 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10mm
Torx: T10, T15, T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head, flat head
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: 15g/14g/Mavic M7 and Shimano 4.5mm spoke wrenches, tyre plug, saw, reamer, brake pad spacer
Weight: 170g

Reasons to buy

+
Super comprehensive tool selection
+
Quality tools
+
Genuinely useful extras
+
Includes tubeless tools
+
Compact dimensions

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited size
-
Pricey at RRP

When we reviewed the Topeak Mini PT30 we concluded that it's a genuinely brilliant piece of kit, describing it as a mini toolbox rather than a multi-tool thanks to its wide range of really useful extras. 

Measuring just 7.5 x 4 x 2cm, this nifty little system will fit into even the smallest of saddlebags and, with help from the included neoprene pouch, it'll remain clean. It might fetch a higher asking price than some of its competitors but with Topeak's reputation for quality construction, we're confident it'll stand the test of time, making this tool an investment for the long term. 

The only small downside is the miniature frame means it lacks leverage for those stickier bolts. It's also a little on the pricy side. 

(Image credit: Blackburn)

Blackburn Tradesman

Inspector Gadget-like tool packs great variety of tools into simple design

Specifications

Allen: 2-8
Torx: T25, T30
Screwdriver: Phillips head, flat head
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: Spoke wrenches, valve core remover, disc brake pad spreader, quick link splitter, quick linker holder
Weight: 136g

Reasons to buy

+
Valve core remover and quick link remover
+
Quick link holder

Reasons to avoid

-
L-Shaped keys complicate some jobs

Blackburn’s Tradesman multi-tool has 18 built-in tools, with Allen heads from 2-8mm, two Torx bits, screwdrivers, a valve core remover and a disc pad spreader. But that's not all; there is also a chain tool with an integrated quick link splitter, and it even has a spot to store your quick link, so you don’t have to dump out your entire seat pack to find it – no word on go-go gadget faster-legs yet, though.

It’s heavy when you drop it onto a scale, and it's pretty big too, though this does give you a bit more leverage for loosening sticky bolts.

Fix-It Sticks Commuter multi-tool laid out with separate parts lined up alongside black carry casel

(Image credit: Fix-It Sticks)

Fix-It Sticks Commuter Kit

Bit-based T-handle tool that gives a little extra for commuters

Specifications

Allen: 2-6
Torx: T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head (P2)
Chain tool: Available in other editions
Extras: 15mm spanner, tyre levers
Weight: 255g

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile with replaceable bits 
+
15mm spanner for axle or pedal repairs
+
Different version for different needs

Reasons to avoid

-
Lots of pieces to keep track of
-
Expensive when going beyond basic model

Starting as an idea on Kickstarter, Fix-It sticks are a unique take on the multi-tool. Using a modular design, two rods come together to create a T-handle wrench with a bit carrier on each end. This also allows you to use the tool both as an L-handle wrench when you need some leverage or a screwdriver for hard to reach spaces. The brand says the wrench can withstand up to 40nm of torque.

The basic kit comes with 2-6mm Allen, a T25 and Phillips head bits but this version adds a 15mm spanner – a rarity among multi-tools – making it useful for running repairs on bikes with axle nuts. It could also be used as a pedal spanner in an emergency. It also comes with tyre levers. 

The extras make it a fair bit heavier than the basic version – 255g compared to 116g – and there are a number of other add-ons available, including a chain breaker and a bit extension

It is a different design approach to the likes of the more classic Swiss army-style Topeak Mini PT30 but comes with a nice case to stash it away safely and there is an option to buy a bracket to mount it behind your bottle cage.  

The Topeak Ratchet Rocket Lite DX+ neatly laid out in unfurled case

(Image credit: Topeak)

Topeak Ratchet Rocket Lite DX+

Ratchet tool that can get into all those hard to reach places

Specifications

Allen: 2-8
Torx: T10, T15, T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head (P2)
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: Polymer tyre levers
Weight: 195g

Reasons to buy

+
Ratchet makes for fast use
+
Very compact design can get into small areas easily
+
Organised case 
+
Tyre levers

Reasons to avoid

-
Bits can be fiddly
-
Not recommended for high-force tightening and loosening
-
On the heavy side

Topeak Ratchet Rocket Lite DX+ is the best tool we have used for getting into those tight areas. Its low height and ratchet system mean that even the most awkward bolts can be tightened or loosened extremely quickly and easily. Topeak offers a good range of bits as standard and, as they are just standard bits, the tool selection can be easily customised or replaced should one go missing. 

Topeak also includes a chain tool compatible up to 12-speed chains (although not Campagnolo hollow-pin chains, as is the standard), a bit holder that adds extra leverage and two slim but surprisingly effective tyre levers in its soft case. Ratchet direction is controlled by a small lever that allows quick switching between tightening or loosening. Topeak has made the bit attachments on the handle of the ratchet tool and bit holder magnetic to securely hold bits in place, stopping them from falling out and getting lost.

Again, it's a bit chunkier and heavier than many of the other options in this list but it is closer to the type of tools you might usually leave at home, while still being very portable.  

The Birzman Feexman E-Version 5 in silver, show in two views – with tools unfolded and closed up for carrying

(Image credit: Birzman)

Birzman Feexman E-Version 5

Best minimalist and lightweight bike multi-tool

Specifications

Allen: 4-6
Torx: T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head (P1)
Chain tool: No
Extras: N/A
Weight: 58g

Reasons to buy

+
Compact
+
Lightweight
+
Inexpensive

Reasons to avoid

-
Might not be enough tools to get the job done

Most of the tools we’ve highlighted here are relatively full-featured, but maybe that’s not what you’re after; instead, you might just need something small and lightweight that will get you out of a pinch. Enter the Birzman Feexman E-Version 5.

It is not going to compare to the Blackburn Tradesman in terms of versatility, but it has three Allen keys, a T25 bit and a Phillips head screwdriver – and is certainly budget-friendly. Even so, it doesn’t sacrifice any quality with an aluminium body and chrome vanadium hardened steel bits. It look pretty slick as well, coming in silver and black versions.

(Image credit: Topeak)
Best option for tubeless tyres

Specifications

Allen: 2-6
Torx: T10, T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head (P2)
Chain tool: No
Extras: Tyre reamer, 3.5mm plug insertion tool, serrated knife/saw, air-stop
Weight: 119g

Reasons to buy

+
High-quality tools 
+
Well-shaped plug fork
+
Blade is useful

Reasons to avoid

-
No 8mm Allen or chain tool

The Topeak Tubi 18 is a typically high-quality set of tools from the German brand with the added extra of a well-equipped tubeless tyre repair feature. A nicely designed integrated fold-out compartment houses an air-stop tool to prevent further pressure loss and – crucially, unlike its cousin the Topeak Mini PT30 – five repair plugs. As well as a thoughtfully designed fork tool to insert the plugs, it also has a serrated knife to trim away the excess – which can be locked in place to keep those fingers safe.  

The conventional tool roster includes 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6mm Allen keys, T10/T25 Torx wrenches and a Philips screwdriver, all made from stainless steel to combat rusting and all really accurately sized for clean, secure connections.

However, you’ll still need to pocket an 8mm Allen key and a chain splitter if you want full trailside repair capability.

(Image credit: Crank Brothers)

Crank Brothers F15

Best tool for stuck bolts

Specifications

Allen: 2-8
Torx: T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head, flat head
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: Magnetic case, bottle opener, spoke wrench
Weight: 163g

Reasons to buy

+
The best looking tool of the bunch 
+
Case is functional

Reasons to avoid

-
Bits can come loose

Hidden inside a nifty magnetised metal case, the Crank Brothers F15 actually has 16 tools including Allen bits ranging from 2-8mm, a T25 Torx, Phillips and flat head screwdrivers a removable chain tool and spoke wrenches.

The case can also be used for additional leverage, which is handy to create extra torque if you’re using the larger Allen bits. It’s not light, but it slides into a pocket with ease, and there is an integrated bottle opener to help you with your post-ride mechanical work. 

(Image credit: Silca)

Silca T-Ratchet + Ti-Torque kit

Perfect if you are worried about crunching your carbon parts

Specifications

Allen: 2-6
Torx: T10, T20, T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head
Chain tool: No
Extras: Ti torque bar, mini-ratchet
Weight: 225g

Reasons to buy

+
72-point ratchet works as T-handle or mini-ratchet

Reasons to avoid

-
RRP is rather high in comparison to traditional tools
-
Torque markings are extremely close together and difficult to read

Making an adjustment to your saddle height is always a bit scary when you're working with carbon. You know the collar needs to be tight enough to prevent the post from slipping, but as you turn the bolt, you’re terrified of hearing a heartbreaking crack. Silca’s T-Ratchet eliminates the problem with the Ti-Torque bar; it's essentially a miniature version of the now-discontinued Park Tool TW-1 beam-style deflection torque wrench that’s small enough to slide into your pocket. 

The other parts of the equation are the 72-point ratchet, which allows for the wrench to be used as a T-handle, a standard ratchet or even a screwdriver. The kit comes with 10 high-quality hardened bits made of S2 steel – generally considered tougher than chromium vanadium for such use – which can be interchanged should you need different sizes, and it's all kept together in a waxed canvas wallet. 

Technical image of Park Tool IB-3 I-Beam Multi-tool with labels of each of the tools

(Image credit: Park Tool)

Park Tool IB-3 I-Beam Multi-tool

Inside out bike multi-tool ideal for getting into tight spaces

Specifications

Allen: 1.5-8
Torx: T25
Screwdriver: Flat head
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: Metal core tyre lever
Weight: 170g

Reasons to buy

+
Design allows for additional leverage 
+
Fits into tight spaces

Reasons to avoid

-
Lots of pieces to keep track of 
-
Don’t forget a real tyre lever

A lot of the best bike multi-tools follow roughly the same design, using two struts on either side with the bits housed in the middle – Park Tool decided to flip it. The IB-3, as the name alludes to, has an ‘i-beam’ up the middle with the tools on either side. This helps get rid of some wasted space and material, and allows the tool to fit into tighter places. 

With 1.5-8mm Allen heads, T25 Torx head, flat head screwdriver, composite wrapped tyre lever complete with 8mm box wrench and spoke wrenches, and a chain tool, the IB-3 packs a lot of drivers into a surprisingly small space. Cleverly, the 8mm box wrench in the tyre lever is used to drive the plunger on the chain tool. However, that tyre lever alone is unlikely to do the job when changing an inner tube, so you may still want to pack extras.

(Image credit: Topeak)

Topeak Mini 20 Pro

Best if you want your tool small but loaded with functions

Specifications

Allen: 2-10
Torx: T10, T25
Screwdriver: Phillips head, flat head
Chain tool: Yes
Extras: Tyre lever, bottle opener, spoke wrench
Weight: 151g

Reasons to buy

+
Neoprene case 
+
Compact

Reasons to avoid

-
Tons of tools 
-
Not feathery light
-
Metal, rather than plastic, tyre lever

Topeak’s Mini 20 is the brand's most fully-featured ‘mini’ bike multi-tool. All in, there are 23 tools here, which Topeak has managed to pack into a surprisingly small and compact package – and a nice neoprene case. 

The wrenches range from 2mm to 10mm, with the smallest size being L-shaped and the 10mm a head that fits onto the end of the 8mm bit. It also has T10 and T25 Torx bits, flat head and Phillips head screwdrivers, and a removable chain breaker. 

The Topeak comes with a chain breaker that has integrated spoke wrenches, while the pin is driven by the 3mm Allen head to give you extra leverage when trying to punch the pin out of a broken link. The metal tyre levers aren't likely to snap on you but come with an 'emergency use only' warning from Topeak for those nervous about their rims.

Best bike multi-tool: everything you need to know

What tools should I carry on my bike?

You don't want to be lugging around a full tool kit on your rides so most cyclists carry a multi-tool that fulfils most of the duties that are likely to be required. In most cases these are small adjustments to seat posts or gear lever placements, but also you want cover for worst-case scenarios.

Most cyclists will also carry a puncture repair kit of sorts, but some of the best bike multi-tools come with elements to help with this, such as tyre levers or even tubeless tyre repair kits. 

Regular home maintenance of your bike before or after you go out for a ride is likely to avoid most issues – and if there is a specific component you have been having trouble with, you could always bring out the particular tool you know will help you to adjust it, rather than attempting to covering for all eventualities.

What is a bike multi-tool?

Many of the best bike multi-tools follow a similar design to a Swiss army knife, with tools hinged at both ends which fold in to a solid body that acts as a handle when one of the tools is in use. 

The majority of the tools are usually Allen keys and screwdrivers for making adjustments to parts of your bike – the most common perhaps being the seatpost. Cyclists of different disciplines have different needs, however, and while there are some basic multi-tools that prioritise being small and lightweight, some can be much more advanced with torque settings or tubeless tyre repair kits.

A different style gaining in popularity are multi-tools that use the type of removable bits you would use with an electric screwdriver. These multi-tools provide more leverage, can fit into tight spaces and allow you to only bring the tools you need, and none that you don’t. They aren’t the golden ticket, however, with lots of small pieces for you to lose, and the bits may not be long enough to reach the recessed bolts on something like a seatpost clamp. 

Many bike multi-tools are based on the classic Leatherman/Swiss army knife design, with a solid body and tools hinged at both ends that fold in to the centre to neatly tuck away when not in use. When a chosen tool is folded out, the body acts as the handle and this is where more sophisticated designs can make a difference. Poorly made multi-tools will start to loosen at the hinges, reducing performance, or aren't able to take the strain required to tighten bigger bolts. The best bike multi-tools are constructed in clever ways that consider the angles you need to negotiate when, say, adjusting a bottle rack, or give you a little extra torque when required. 

What do you need in a bike multi-tool?

The majority of your bike can be disassembled with a 4mm and 5mm Allen key so, at the very least, the best bike multi-tools should have Allen keys with these two sizes. It’s also worth having a 6mm. While some tools may have an 8mm or 10mm bit, quite often they aren't much use because the tool doesn’t offer enough leverage to break a bolt that size loose. 

Some bikes also use Torx bolts – we're looking at you Scott – usually in a T25 and sometimes a T30, and a Phillips head screwdriver also comes in handy for derailleurs. 

The other tool we prioritise on a bike multi-tool is a chain splitter. Even if you have a quick link in your spare tyre kit, you’ll need a chain tool to pop the old link off. Quite often the chain tool will also have spoke wrenches built into the lever.

And along with the rise of tubeless tyres comes the need for new tools. A valve core remover isn't something many will need to use at the roadside, but if you don't have one at home (or if you lost it again), then it's good to know there's one built into your multi-tool. 

A recent en-vogue tool is the tubeless tyre plug and, as such, more and more multi-tools are adding these to the list. If you run tubeless on a gravel bike, then this will be a worthwhile addition, but if you're a roadie running latex tubes, then it's just unnecessary extra weight in your pocket. 

Which bike multi-tool will last the longest?

A bike multi-tool might not be something you use all that often, especially if you have a tool kit at home, but it is probably going to spend a lot of time in your pocket or saddlebag exposed to the elements. The last thing you want is to pull your tool out to fix a roadside issue to find all the Allen keys have corroded into place, or have a cheaply made tool break when a little bit of pressure is applied.

It is a balance between convenience and durability, but it is wise to opt for a multi-tool with a strong build quality, using precision-machined, hardened steel for the tools, rather than solely making your choice based on weight or size.

Which extras should I look for?

Some more extensive bike multi-tools have extras such as tyre levers, torque wrenches and bottle-openers. While a torque wrench can be useful out on the road, primarily if you're dealing with carbon components, the rest is a matter of personal opinion – do you think it's worth carrying the extra grams? 

Ultimately, tyre levers only weigh a few grams, and even an expensive set doesn't cost all that much or take up much space in your pocket. When it comes to multi-tools with fun additions such as knives, pliers and bottle openers, they might be used once in a blue moon but are they really going to be useful for your Sunday club ride? Once again, it all comes back to considering your own specific needs. 

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Mildred joined as Reviews Writer for Cyclingnews and BikePerfect in December 2020. She loves all forms of cycling from long-distance audax to daily errand-running by bike, and does almost everything on two wheels, including moving house, and started out her cycling career working in a bike shop. For the past five years she's volunteered at The Bristol Bike Project as a mechanic and session coordinator, and now sits on its board of directors.

Since then she's gone on to write for a multitude of cycling publications, including Bikeradar, Cycling Plus, Singletrack, Red Bull, Cycling UK and Total Women's Cycling. She's dedicated to providing more coverage of women's specific cycling tech, elevating under-represented voices in the sport, and making cycling more accessible overall. 

Height: 156cm (5'2")

Weight: 75kg

Rides: Stayer Groadinger UG, Triban RC520 Women's Disc, Genesis Flyer, Marin Larkspur, Cotic BFe 26, Clandestine custom bike

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