Skip to main content

A new era in hardtail performance

Image 1 of 12

Trek's new hardtail,

Trek's new hardtail, (Image credit: Steve Medcroft)
Image 2 of 12

A head-on look

A head-on look (Image credit: Steve Medcroft)
Image 3 of 12

The stock 9.9 will come with all XTR and Bontrager components.

The stock 9.9 will come with all XTR and Bontrager components. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 4 of 12

A head-on look at the Madone-style sinle top-tube/down-tube.

A head-on look at the Madone-style sinle top-tube/down-tube. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 5 of 12

The production model will come with an 80mm Rock Shox SID. The team bikes Chris Eatough and Sue Haywood were riding in Mammoth were equipped with 100mm Rock Shox Reba's.

The production model will come with an 80mm Rock Shox SID. The team bikes Chris Eatough and Sue Haywood were riding in Mammoth were equipped with 100mm Rock Shox Reba's. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 6 of 12

Trek's new hardtail, with frame construction using OCLV tubing and features modeling the Madone, weighs 300 grams less than the 9.8.

Trek's new hardtail, with frame construction using OCLV tubing and features modeling the Madone, weighs 300 grams less than the 9.8. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 7 of 12

Asymmetrical seat stays help reduce weight and improve tyre clearence. All the production bikes will come disc-specific. Trek will offer a frame-only version with mounts for side-pull v-brakes and tabs for mounting disc-brake calipers.

Asymmetrical seat stays help reduce weight and improve tyre clearence. All the production bikes will come disc-specific. Trek will offer a frame-only version with mounts for side-pull v-brakes and tabs for mounting disc-brake calipers. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 8 of 12

Using Trek's OCLV 110 Carbon (instead of the OCLV Honeybcomb used in the 9.8) to construct the new 9.9 frame, Trek engineer Scott Nielson says they can make much finer refinements in geometry, shape and tubing contruction

Using Trek's OCLV 110 Carbon (instead of the OCLV Honeybcomb used in the 9.8) to construct the new 9.9 frame, Trek engineer Scott Nielson says they can make much finer refinements in geometry, shape and tubing contruction (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 9 of 12

A side look at the integrated headset and the knuckle in the combined top tube/down tube.

A side look at the integrated headset and the knuckle in the combined top tube/down tube. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 10 of 12

A naked frame reveals the detail in the one-piece lugs that make up the connection points for the tubing. The lugs, like the headset lug shown here, are made as one piece.

A naked frame reveals the detail in the one-piece lugs that make up the connection points for the tubing. The lugs, like the headset lug shown here, are made as one piece. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 11 of 12

The bottom bracket lug.

The bottom bracket lug. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)
Image 12 of 12

The seat post lug.

The seat post lug. (Image credit: Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com)

no copy in legacy cms

Thank you for reading 5 articles this month*

Join now for unlimited access

Enjoy your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1

*Read 5 free articles per month without a subscription

after your trial you will be billed £4.99 $7.99 €5.99 per month, cancel anytime. Or sign up for one year for just £49 $79 €59

Join now for unlimited access

Try your first month for just £1 / $1 / €1