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Video: New Trek Madone 9 Series

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Trek says the new Madone's aero shape was designed with water bottles in mind

Trek says the new Madone's aero shape was designed with water bottles in mind (Image credit: James Huang)
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Trek has radically redesigned the 2016 Madone, turning it into a full-blown aero road racing machine but yet still compromising little to do so (James Huang / Immediate Media)

Trek has radically redesigned the 2016 Madone, turning it into a full-blown aero road racing machine but yet still compromising little to do so (James Huang / Immediate Media) (Image credit: James Huang)
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The narrow frontal profile required Trek to develop these nifty, spring-loaded 'vector wings' that pop open when the bars are turned

The narrow frontal profile required Trek to develop these nifty, spring-loaded 'vector wings' that pop open when the bars are turned (Image credit: James Huang)
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There are separate, independent adjustments for both arm position and spring tension on each side. They're clearly marked, too, to help with setup and maintenance. A tidy quick-release lever is built into the caliper, too

There are separate, independent adjustments for both arm position and spring tension on each side. They're clearly marked, too, to help with setup and maintenance. A tidy quick-release lever is built into the caliper, too (Image credit: James Huang)
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As usual, Trek fits the new Madone with its long-standing BB90 bottom bracket design, which features an ultra-wide 90mm width and bearings that press directly into the carbon structure

As usual, Trek fits the new Madone with its long-standing BB90 bottom bracket design, which features an ultra-wide 90mm width and bearings that press directly into the carbon structure (Image credit: James Huang)
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While many aero road bars practically insist that the tops remain untaped, the Madone setup at least gives you the option without messing up the aesthetics

While many aero road bars practically insist that the tops remain untaped, the Madone setup at least gives you the option without messing up the aesthetics (Image credit: James Huang)
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The 'Madone Control Center' incorporates both the junction box and battery into an easily accessible hatch in the down tube - or for mechanical systems, a large barrel adjuster and a pair of hidden housing stops

The 'Madone Control Center' incorporates both the junction box and battery into an easily accessible hatch in the down tube - or for mechanical systems, a large barrel adjuster and a pair of hidden housing stops (Image credit: James Huang)
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A look inside the 'Madone Control Center' in both electronic and mechanical versions (James Huang / Immediate Media)

A look inside the 'Madone Control Center' in both electronic and mechanical versions (James Huang / Immediate Media) (Image credit: James Huang)
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The seat tube features a deep profile throughout its length, but it's actually concealing a secondary seat tube inside (James Huang / Immediate Media)

The seat tube features a deep profile throughout its length, but it's actually concealing a secondary seat tube inside (James Huang / Immediate Media) (Image credit: James Huang)

Trek has launched a radical redesign of its iconic Madone platform, transforming it from a jack-of-all-trades road racer into the full-blown aero machine currently missing from the lineup.

Dramatically more aggressively shaped than the existing 7 Series model it will be sold next to, Trek says the new Madone 9 Series by itself will save its rider more than two minutes per hour (or 19 watts of effort) as compared to a fully non-aero bike while still maintaining sub-1kg claimed frame weights and – quite remarkably – getting more comfortable, not less.

For a first ride review of the Trek Madone 9 Series click here, and for further details on Trek's new bike and pricing click here and to subscribe to the Cyclingnews video channel click here