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Second consecutive Vuelta a San Juan stage shortened due to extreme heat

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Blue skies and sunshine on stage 6 of the Vuelta a San Juan

Blue skies and sunshine on stage 6 of the Vuelta a San Juan (Image credit: Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)
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It was such a hot day that the stage was shortened to ensure the health and safety of the riders

It was such a hot day that the stage was shortened to ensure the health and safety of the riders (Image credit: Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)
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Tom Boonen trying to cool down with help from Kurt Van Roosbroeck

Tom Boonen trying to cool down with help from Kurt Van Roosbroeck (Image credit: Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)
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The Quick-Step Floors team cool down post stage

The Quick-Step Floors team cool down post stage (Image credit: Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)
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Blue skies and sunshine for stage 2 in San Juan

Blue skies and sunshine for stage 2 in San Juan (Image credit: Tim de Waele/TDWSport.com)

For a second day in a row, extreme heat in Argentina has led the Vuelta a San Juan organisers to shorten a stage, with one lap being cut from today’s circuit-based final stage in the city of San Juan.

The peloton will now race seven, rather than eight, laps of the course around the perimeter of the city centre, making for a reduction of 15.9km. The total distance for the stage, which was meant to be 138.2km, will now be 122.3km.

The final stage was already set to be considerably shorter than the 185km stage 6 route that ended up being truncated by 17.6 kilometres, but temperatures of over 40 degrees are once again expected in the Argentine province on Sunday afternoon.

The decision to curtail the penultimate stage was made mid-race, with just over 100km remaining, but the call to cut a lap from the final day was made in advance. The plan was made on Saturday night and signed and sealed on Sunday morning in a meeting between the WorldTour teams and race organisers and officials.

Being a 2.1 categorised race, the Vuelta a San Juan is not subject to the UCI’s Extreme Weather Protocol, which was introduced last year to make disucssions between stakeholders – riders, teams, organisers, and officials – mandatory if extreme conditions are predicted. Nevertheless, category 1 races are recommended to ‘follow principles of the protocol’ and in San Juan a modified protocol has been employed, whereby the organisers select a number of teams with which to discuss the conditions each day.

In addition, head commissaire Thomas Nee, who has stressed the importance of rider safety, has been doing the rounds of the team buses ahead of each stage and has regularly extended the feed zones.

 

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Deputy Editor - Europe. Patrick is an NCTJ-trained journalist who has seven years’ experience covering professional cycling. He has a modern languages degree from Durham University and has been able to put it to some use in what is a multi-lingual sport, with a particular focus on French and Spanish-speaking riders. After joining Cyclingnews as a staff writer on the back of work experience, Patrick became Features Editor in 2018 and oversaw significant growth in the site’s long-form and in-depth output. Since 2021 he has been Deputy Editor - Europe, taking more responsibility for the site’s content as a whole, while still writing and - despite a pandemic-induced hiatus - travelling to races around the world. Away from cycling, Patrick spends most of his time playing or watching other forms of sport - football, tennis, trail running, darts, to name a few, but he draws the line at rugby.