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Pro bike: Luca Paolini's Canyon Ultimate CF SLX

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Paolini's Canyon Ultimate CF SLX with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 and Mavic Cosmic CXR 60 tubulars

Paolini's Canyon Ultimate CF SLX with Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 and Mavic Cosmic CXR 60 tubulars (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Luca Paolini is a fan of buttons on the bike, whether on his mobile phone or his Di2 set-up

Luca Paolini is a fan of buttons on the bike, whether on his mobile phone or his Di2 set-up (Image credit: Twitter / Radsport)
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Pro gear is always cleaned well after every stage. But you can't wash away crashes

Pro gear is always cleaned well after every stage. But you can't wash away crashes (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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A little tape keeps the valve stem from rattling. And at least one spoke has seen better days

A little tape keeps the valve stem from rattling. And at least one spoke has seen better days (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Katusha can't use the rubber aero strips Mavic calls Blades that pop into the trough between rim and tubular because the UCI forbids their use

Katusha can't use the rubber aero strips Mavic calls Blades that pop into the trough between rim and tubular because the UCI forbids their use (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Mavic Cosmic CXR 60 tubular wheels

Mavic Cosmic CXR 60 tubular wheels (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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How clean is your cassette? Katusha mechanics do not fool around

How clean is your cassette? Katusha mechanics do not fool around (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The Dura-Ace cranks are definitley on the shorter side

The Dura-Ace cranks are definitley on the shorter side (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Paolini cuts quite the figure at the Tour

Paolini cuts quite the figure at the Tour (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Paolini's name perhaps isn't as recognizable as it once was, but he still stands out visually with his beard, Air Attack helmet and Assos glasses

Paolini's name perhaps isn't as recognizable as it once was, but he still stands out visually with his beard, Air Attack helmet and Assos glasses (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Katusha riders have the Ultimate plus the new Aeroad CF SLX to choose from

Katusha riders have the Ultimate plus the new Aeroad CF SLX to choose from (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Shimano Di2 has junction boxes that can plug in various satellite shifters. Alternatively, as Paolini's mechanics have done, you can plug the satellite into the rear of the shifter bodies

Shimano Di2 has junction boxes that can plug in various satellite shifters. Alternatively, as Paolini's mechanics have done, you can plug the satellite into the rear of the shifter bodies (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Paolini likes his hoods waaay up, with a sprint shifter button tucked onto the curve

Paolini likes his hoods waaay up, with a sprint shifter button tucked onto the curve (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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An SRM mount on alloy Ritchey Classic bend bars

An SRM mount on alloy Ritchey Classic bend bars (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Paolini has buttons a-plenty on his bars, both here with the climber's switch and on either drop with the sprint shifters

Paolini has buttons a-plenty on his bars, both here with the climber's switch and on either drop with the sprint shifters (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The Twittersphere quickly jumped in to heckle

The Twittersphere quickly jumped in to heckle (Image credit: Twitter / Radsport)
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Photographer Graham Watson caught Paolini using his phone during stage 8 of the Tour de France

Photographer Graham Watson caught Paolini using his phone during stage 8 of the Tour de France (Image credit: Twitter / Radsport)
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These unmarked red pads look remarkably similar to the Corima pads used by Astana. And that tread pattern looks remarkably like a Veloflex

These unmarked red pads look remarkably similar to the Corima pads used by Astana. And that tread pattern looks remarkably like a Veloflex (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)

This article appeared first on BikeRadar

Katusha rider Luca Paolini was caught using his phone during stage 8 of the Tour de France by photographer Graham Watson, who posted an image on his Twitter account. The photo quickly went viral, and Daniel McMahon wrote the story.

BikeRadar had the chance to get a close look at Paolini's bike, and discovered that the Italian is a fan of digital technology, with a full array of Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 shifter buttons on his cockpit. Paolini has no less than six buttons at his fingertips — and that's not counting those on his phone.

Katusha races with Mavic wheels. Here, Paolini has Cosmic CXR 60s with Veloflex tubulars rebadged as Mavic. While Mavic delivers the CXR 60s with the snap-in 'blades' that fill in the space between tubular and wheel for aerodynamics, the team could not use them if they wanted to; UCI rules forbid the blades.

All with all Tour rider, Paolini has several nearly identical bikes at the race. The one we featured here did not have an SRM power meter on at the time, although the handlebars have a mount for the SRM PowerControl head unit. Perhaps due to the absence of the SRM, we weighed this bike at 6.7kg / 14.77lb, 100g under the UCI's minimum weight.

Paolini's front-end set-up is quite striking, as he likes his bars and shifters cocked way back. Perhaps this is because of his massive 10cm of drop from the top of his saddle to the top of his bars.

While the buttons and the cockpit geometry might be hard to spot while watching the Tour de France on TV, Paolini certainly is not; with a thick beard, enormous Assos sunglasses and a Giro Air Attack helmet, Paolini cuts quite the figure.

Click through the gallery for a closer look at his bike. We regret not being able to bring you the full specs on his mobile phone...

Complete bike specifications

Frameset: Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
Stem: Ritchey WCS alloy, 120mm
Handlebars: Ritchey Classic alloy, 42cm
Brakes: Shimano Dura-Ace 9000
Shift/brake levers: Shimano Dura-Ace 9070 Di2
Front derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 FD-9070
Rear derailleur: Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 RD-9070
Cassette: Shimano Dura-Ace CS-9000, 11-25t
Chain: Shimano Dura-Ace CN-9000
Crankset: Shimano Dura-Ace FC-9000, 170mm
Power meter: SRM on another bike; none on this bike
Pedals: Shimano Dura-Ace PD-9000
Wheels: Mavic Cosmix CXR 60
Tyres: Veloflex rebadged as Mavic tubulars
Saddle: Selle Italia Team Edition SLR
Seatpost: Canyon Ultimate
Weight: 6.7kg / 14.77lb

Critical measurements 

Rider's height: 1.74m (5ft 9in)
Rider's weight: 66kg / 146lb
Reach, saddle tip to bar: 54cm
Drop, saddle top to handlebar top: 10cm
Saddle height: 74cm
Stem length: 120mm

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