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Forme Coaching analysis of racing: Tirreno Adriatico

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Simon Gerrans and Dan Lloyd before the start.

Simon Gerrans and Dan Lloyd before the start. (Image credit: Isabelle Duchesne)
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Hard day with bunch sprint

Hard day with bunch sprint (Image credit: Daniel Simms)
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Long hilly day

Long hilly day (Image credit: Daniel Simms)
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Slow Average speed but high and varied power.jpg Slow Average speed but high and varied power

Slow Average speed but high and varied power.jpg Slow Average speed but high and varied power (Image credit: Daniel Simms)
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Tirreno long stage

Tirreno long stage (Image credit: Daniel Simms)
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British pro Daniel Lloyd of Cervélo TestTeam

British pro Daniel Lloyd of Cervélo TestTeam (Image credit: Gerry McManus)
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Vincenzo Nibali (Liquigas-Cannondale) celebrates his victory on Prati di Tivo.

Vincenzo Nibali (Liquigas-Cannondale) celebrates his victory on Prati di Tivo. (Image credit: Bettini Photo)
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Michael Mørkøv's complete SRM data from Tirreno-Adriatico team time trial.

Michael Mørkøv's complete SRM data from Tirreno-Adriatico team time trial. (Image credit: Saxo Bank Sungard)
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Forme Coaching

Forme Coaching (Image credit: Daniel Simms)

Tirreno Adriatico, or the ‘Race of the Two Seas,’ is looking particularly tough for 2012.

The riders will cover over 1000km in the five road stages, bookended by two time trials, a team time trial to open the race and an individual one to bring it to a close.

Typically, the winner of Milan-San Remo will come from Tirreno, with Matt Goss's win last year being the only exception in over a decade.

In the past, riders preparing for the first classic of the season would often ride for a number of kilometres after one of the stages, getting their bodies prepared for the 300km which they’ll face three days after the finish of Tirreno.

However, with stage four being a very arduous 252km, that won't be necessary this year.

The nature of the race, with its long back to back stages, will really increase the riders’ chronic training load, or CTL, which is what makes it perfect as the final preparation for the classics riders before the one day monuments loom.

Let's have a closer look at the stages.

Stage One, 16.9km Team Time Trial

This flat and relatively short opening team time trial will be very intense, with the winning team’s average speed likely to be over 55kph. The teams will decide on a set order before the race, and will get up to speed as soon as possible off the start ramp.

Stage Four: