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Armstrong may take part in Cookson doping inquiry?

By:
Cycling News
Published:
October 29, 2013, 19:10 GMT,
Updated:
October 29, 2013, 20:40 GMT
Edition:
First Edition Cycling News, Wednesday, October 30, 2013
UCI president Hein Verbruggen with Lance Armstrong in 2002

UCI president Hein Verbruggen with Lance Armstrong in 2002

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UCI president making strides with independent commission

Lance Armstrong may take part in new UCI president Brian Cookson's Independent Commission into alleged wrongdoings by his predecessors and the sport's doping past, according to the BBC.

The UCI announced today that it is in discussions with the World Anti-Doping Agency to finalize the framework of the Independent Commission.

According to the BBC report, Armstrong's representatives have been approached to see if he would be willing to speak to the investigators. However, when contacted by Cyclingnews, Armstrong stated that his representatives have yet to be approached by the UCI.

US Anti-Doping Agency CEO Travis Tygart stated earlier this year that he believes Armstrong has proof that the UCI was complicit in his doping.

Cookson has made immediate strides toward fulfilling his campaign manifesto, having launched into a widespread audit of the UCI's anti-doping systems, which will be used to set up an independent anti-doping organisation to police the sport.

He has also made no delays to beginning an inquiry into serious allegations of misconduct by previous president Pat McQuaid and his predecessor Hein Verbruggen. Armstrong could be a key witness in the case, which stems from the US Anti-Doping Agency's investigation into doping in the US Postal Service Team.

Both Floyd Landis and Tyler Hamilton have alleged that the UCI under McQuaid and Verbruggen failed to take adequate action to combat the rampant use of EPO in cycling during the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Landis testified that he heard Armstrong say that the UCI helped him brush an EPO positive from the Tour de Suisse under the rug. McQuaid went on the offensive, insisting that the samples were only suspicious for EPO but did not meet the threshold for a positive test.

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