Skip to main content

On show: Eurobike 2009 Part 2

Image 1 of 31

Motorex's carbon assembly provides needed friction when clamping carbon parts but doesn't use any added particles in its blend.

Motorex's carbon assembly provides needed friction when clamping carbon parts but doesn't use any added particles in its blend. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 2 of 31

Cross season is here! Continental has unfortunately put its tubular program on hold for now but in the meantime, you can instead opt for this tread based on the company's popular Speed King mountain bike design.

Cross season is here! Continental has unfortunately put its tubular program on hold for now but in the meantime, you can instead opt for this tread based on the company's popular Speed King mountain bike design. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 3 of 31

For faster courses, Continental offers its semi-slick Cyclocross Speed clincher.

For faster courses, Continental offers its semi-slick Cyclocross Speed clincher. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 4 of 31

The grippy Rubber Queen is now offered in a 2.2"-wide casing for riders wanting good grip but in a slightly lighter package. The pink sidewalls are a show-exclusive for now but Continental might put it into production depending on consumer feedback.

The grippy Rubber Queen is now offered in a 2.2"-wide casing for riders wanting good grip but in a slightly lighter package. The pink sidewalls are a show-exclusive for now but Continental might put it into production depending on consumer feedback. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 5 of 31

Fancy a set of Continental Speed Kings in green? They're not in production right now but Continental might be convinced if it hears from enough people.

Fancy a set of Continental Speed Kings in green? They're not in production right now but Continental might be convinced if it hears from enough people. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 6 of 31

Crankbrothers' Cobalt wheels are now available in a striking black and gold color scheme.

Crankbrothers' Cobalt wheels are now available in a striking black and gold color scheme. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 7 of 31

The Joule 3.0 is markedly bigger than the 2.0 but boasts a brighter color screen and built-in buttons to adjust resistance on the company's electronically controlled trainers.

The Joule 3.0 is markedly bigger than the 2.0 but boasts a brighter color screen and built-in buttons to adjust resistance on the company's electronically controlled trainers. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 8 of 31

What am I supposed to do today? The 'Activities' screen on CycleOps' new Joule 2.0 computer guides you through your workout with power and time targets.

What am I supposed to do today? The 'Activities' screen on CycleOps' new Joule 2.0 computer guides you through your workout with power and time targets. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 9 of 31

The main 'Dashboard' screen on the CycleOps Joule 2.0 computer delivers the same bits of information as on the original PowerTap computer head but with a more comprehensive view that requires fewer button pushes.

The main 'Dashboard' screen on the CycleOps Joule 2.0 computer delivers the same bits of information as on the original PowerTap computer head but with a more comprehensive view that requires fewer button pushes. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 10 of 31

How many matches did I burn today? This report shows how many hard efforts you did.

How many matches did I burn today? This report shows how many hard efforts you did. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 11 of 31

After your ride, pull up the Joule's eight reports for an in-depth snapshot of what you've done today - and compare to past data, too.

After your ride, pull up the Joule's eight reports for an in-depth snapshot of what you've done today - and compare to past data, too. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 12 of 31

This report outlines the usual metrics: ride time, distance, energy expenditure, temperature, and average power output.

This report outlines the usual metrics: ride time, distance, energy expenditure, temperature, and average power output. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 13 of 31

French mountain biking journalist Olivier Beart gives the Dopo system a spin.

French mountain biking journalist Olivier Beart gives the Dopo system a spin. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 14 of 31

A chain connects the driver box to the crankset to help drive the rear wheel.

A chain connects the driver box to the crankset to help drive the rear wheel. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 15 of 31

The Dopo system's inventor claims you can increase power output by 10-20 percent by incorporating your arms.

The Dopo system's inventor claims you can increase power output by 10-20 percent by incorporating your arms. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 16 of 31

A U-joint transfers the motion into the driver box and allows for normal steering.

A U-joint transfers the motion into the driver box and allows for normal steering. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 17 of 31

The new fi'zi:k Aerodynamic Pa:k is a hard-shelled container for your ride essentials.

The new fi'zi:k Aerodynamic Pa:k is a hard-shelled container for your ride essentials. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 18 of 31

Undo the single rear latch and the Pa:k drops open. An EVA liner helps keep contents from rattling.

Undo the single rear latch and the Pa:k drops open. An EVA liner helps keep contents from rattling. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 19 of 31

Mountain bikers looking for a splash of color can now use fi'zi:k's new lock-on grips with easy-to-replace Microtex covers.

Mountain bikers looking for a splash of color can now use fi'zi:k's new lock-on grips with easy-to-replace Microtex covers. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 20 of 31

This handy rubber ring slides on to your seatpost to help keep water from flowing down into your frame.

This handy rubber ring slides on to your seatpost to help keep water from flowing down into your frame. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 21 of 31

fi'zi:k's Spine Concept sizing system matches riders to its saddles based on flexibility.

fi'zi:k's Spine Concept sizing system matches riders to its saddles based on flexibility. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 22 of 31

The new fi'zi:k Vesta women's-specific saddle incorporates a deep central channel to help relieve pressure on soft tissue.

The new fi'zi:k Vesta women's-specific saddle incorporates a deep central channel to help relieve pressure on soft tissue. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 23 of 31

For now, Geax is still the only company with a reasonably deep lineup of off-road tubulars.

For now, Geax is still the only company with a reasonably deep lineup of off-road tubulars. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 24 of 31

Geax's new Synapse is aimed at aggressive riders looking for maximum grip.

Geax's new Synapse is aimed at aggressive riders looking for maximum grip. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 25 of 31

KS Suspension's new hybrid fork incorporates all of its movement above the crown.

KS Suspension's new hybrid fork incorporates all of its movement above the crown. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 26 of 31

The piggyback reservoir on KS's latest telescoping seatpost allows for more travel in a shorter overall package.

The piggyback reservoir on KS's latest telescoping seatpost allows for more travel in a shorter overall package. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 27 of 31

Magura has mostly focused on tweaking its suspension forks for '10 with new damper internals that supposedly yield a lower breakaway threshold and a more progressive feel.

Magura has mostly focused on tweaking its suspension forks for '10 with new damper internals that supposedly yield a lower breakaway threshold and a more progressive feel. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 28 of 31

The new Magura Albert Plus knobs still allow for platform on/off and adjustable threshold but in a neater looking package that still easily accepts a remote cable.

The new Magura Albert Plus knobs still allow for platform on/off and adjustable threshold but in a neater looking package that still easily accepts a remote cable. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 29 of 31

Mavic carries on with its R-Sys wheel design, adding a new SL variant for '10.

Mavic carries on with its R-Sys wheel design, adding a new SL variant for '10. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 30 of 31

The new R-Sys SL hub uses a carbon fiber center section.

The new R-Sys SL hub uses a carbon fiber center section. (Image credit: James Huang)
Image 31 of 31

The new Maxxis Aspen tread pairs a fast-rolling low-profile center with aggressive side knobs.

The new Maxxis Aspen tread pairs a fast-rolling low-profile center with aggressive side knobs. (Image credit: James Huang)

CycleOps launches ultra-intuitive Joule computer range

CycleOps' new Joule computers aren't revolutionary in terms of the information they collect or the accuracy of their power-measuring systems but rather the context in which that information is delivered and presented to the end user. Unlike some current power training methods that require detailed post-ride analysis and evaluation on a desktop computer, Joule delivers the information in an easy-to-understand format right on the head unit.

'Dashboard' mode (CycleOps' answer to the question, 'What am I doing?') essentially provides the same data as on its current computer but with a larger and clearer display that presents more information at a glance without having to scroll through multiple screens. Just as before, current, average and maximum values for metrics such as speed, power, and cadence can be selected at will but a new joystick eases navigation.

After your ride is completed, though, Joule can then pull up eight different 'Reports' ('What have I done?') for an instant snapshot at your workout – all without having to download your data first. Along with the usual bits of information like average wattage, ride distance, time, total elevation gain, etc., Joule can display very handy figures like training stress score, kilojoules expended, time spent in various power zones, and how much time was spent above a certain effort level – i.e., how many 'matches' you burned.

Even better, each one of those report figures can be compared to past performances up to a full year prior ('Am I improving?') – again, without having to dig up numbers on your computer first.

However, CycleOps would certainly rather have you use its proprietary (and included) PowerAgent desktop software, particularly as it also allows Joule users to upload preset workout plans right to the head unit. From there, prompts on the screen direct you as to how long intervals should be, how much rest you should take in between efforts, and exactly how hard those efforts should be in terms of power output ('What should I do?').

Prerecorded complete rides (even those done by other users) can even be uploaded to the Joule computer head so other routes can be replicated in the real world in terms of power requirements.

CycleOps will offer the Joule in both a compact, outdoor-specific 2.0 version (US$499/€399) with a backlit black-and-white LCD screen along with an indoor-specific 3.0 (US$549/€499) with a larger and finer color display and additional controls for use with one of CycleOps' electronically controlled indoor trainers.

Both will be available around the end of the year and the standard ANT+ wireless protocol will also make Joule compatible with later PowerTap hubs or other power meters such as SRM or Quarq.

Fi'zi:k's women's-specific Vitesse reborn as Vesta

Fi'zi:k's new women's-specific Vesta saddle takes its popular Vitesse hull and adds in a full-length central depression to relief pressure on sensitive areas plus a wider nose for more comfort when you're on the rivet. K:ium rails will keep the price points reasonable and maintain a competitive 249g claimed weight and fi'zi:k's excellent Wing Flex feature will make its way into the design as well.

Two conventional colors will be offered – grey suede with white Microtex or a more straightforward black Microtex – along with a decidedly wilder looking 'Miss Berlin' pattern.

Off-road riders that have previous preferred to wrap their bars with fi'zi:k's colorful Microtex tape can now instead simply use the company's bolt-on grips. The teardrop profile provides a more natural fit in your palm and the Microtex cover is easily replaceable once worn – or if you just want to run a different color. Fi'zi:k will include two sets of covers with each set.

Like fi'zi:k's clip-on bags but want something with a sleeker appearance? New for '10 is the new Aerodynamic Pa:k, a hardshelled seat pack that uses the same clip system as usual but with a unique diamond-shaped profile that perfectly matches the company's Arione. The molded body presumably does a decent job of keeping out moisture, an EVA foam liner quiets rattles and contents are easily accessed with a single latch at the rear.

And now for something completely different…

Among the wildest creations we've seen in some time was the Dopo (Double Powered Bike), an add-on system that its inventor claims can boost power output by 10-20 percent – by incorporating a seesaw-like rocking motion in the handlebars.

Critical elements include a proprietary stem that can rotate about the extension axis, a tie-rod connecting the handlebar to a bell crank mounted below the fork crown, and a set of U-joints, cogs, and chains that transfers energy into the crankset. The amplitude of handlebar motion can be adjusted depending on the tie-rod clamp position on the bar and steering is performed as usual.

It's unclear exactly how much weight the system adds though it certainly looks fairly weighty to us what with its network of metallic machinery, rods, chains and clamps, and given the intricacy of construction it's likely quite expensive as well. A brief test ride (on a stationary trainer) proved interesting to say the least but whether or not it'll actually be successful in the marketplace when it arrives in early '10 is anyone's guess.