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Video: A typical race morning in the life of Alex Bowden

Alex Bowden (Team Type 1) fights to return to the pack after an unfortunately timed flat at the bottom of the climb.

Alex Bowden (Team Type 1) fights to return to the pack after an unfortunately timed flat at the bottom of the climb. (Image credit: Cynthia Lou)

Team Type 1-Sanofi's original cause, a fight againt diabetes, has become more widespread since the US squad jumped to the Pro Continental level in 2010 and started racing more in Europe. Cyclingnews went behind the scenes to understand the daily life of an elite rider affected by this diabetes.

Alew Bowden, a 22-year-old neo-pro, gave a video interview at 6:00 am, before his breakfast at the Tour of Rwanda at the end of November.

"Every morning, I get up and I need to check my sugar and five myself an injection," said Bowden, who joined in the Team Type 1 development squad in 2010. He started racing in 2004, three years after he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes.

The Illinois rider said that he controls his sugar levels 10 to 15 times a day, notably four times between 6:00 am and 8:00am and then on his bike during races.

Bowden said cycling is a "great way to control diabetes because the exercise is good for helping his blood sugar numbers".

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