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Pro Bike: Trofimov's Canyon Aeroad CF SLX

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The new Canyon Aeroad CF SLX is a 960g frame that has been in development since 2012

The new Canyon Aeroad CF SLX is a 960g frame that has been in development since 2012 (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Trofimov uses a Sellle Italia Team Edition SLR

Trofimov uses a Sellle Italia Team Edition SLR (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The frame has what Canyon is calling Trident 2.0 - a truncated airfoil shape

The frame has what Canyon is calling Trident 2.0 - a truncated airfoil shape (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Direct-mount brakes are used front and rear. But instead of mounting the rear calliper under the chainstays, a la the aero Trek Madone, Canyon puts it in the standard place, claiming that it is more aero this way

Direct-mount brakes are used front and rear. But instead of mounting the rear calliper under the chainstays, a la the aero Trek Madone, Canyon puts it in the standard place, claiming that it is more aero this way (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Katusha's mechanic declined to name the unmarked brake pads

Katusha's mechanic declined to name the unmarked brake pads (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Mavic Cosmic Carbone Ultimates have a unique non-drive spoke configuration

Mavic Cosmic Carbone Ultimates have a unique non-drive spoke configuration (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Mavic-branded tubulars are used across the team

Mavic-branded tubulars are used across the team (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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While the Canyon Aeroad CF SLX will be sold with an integrated bar/stem combination, the team is using standard Ritchey comonents, largely in alloy

While the Canyon Aeroad CF SLX will be sold with an integrated bar/stem combination, the team is using standard Ritchey comonents, largely in alloy (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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It's a Ritchey WCS alloy 120mm stem for Trofimov

It's a Ritchey WCS alloy 120mm stem for Trofimov (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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While the team has SRM power meters and Power Control 7 units, a few riders use tiny Osynce

While the team has SRM power meters and Power Control 7 units, a few riders use tiny Osynce (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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A clean solution for running a Di2 wire

A clean solution for running a Di2 wire (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The new steerer tube tapers to 1.25in, the same as on the CF SLX, which should stiffen up the bike compared to the last Aeroad

The new steerer tube tapers to 1.25in, the same as on the CF SLX, which should stiffen up the bike compared to the last Aeroad (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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Canyon was able to widen the down tube more than expected, finding that the front wheel churned up enough turbulence to 'tuck' a wider down tube in behind with no negative aero affect

Canyon was able to widen the down tube more than expected, finding that the front wheel churned up enough turbulence to 'tuck' a wider down tube in behind with no negative aero affect (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The Trident 2.0 shape is based on the Trident airfoil used on the Speedmax, but this one has a 2.6:1 ratio instead of the original 3:1

The Trident 2.0 shape is based on the Trident airfoil used on the Speedmax, but this one has a 2.6:1 ratio instead of the original 3:1 (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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There are two seatpost options: one with a 0 to 15mm offset and another with 15 to 20mm

There are two seatpost options: one with a 0 to 15mm offset and another with 15 to 20mm (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)
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The top-mounted seatpost clamp cleans up the sides

The top-mounted seatpost clamp cleans up the sides (Image credit: Ben Delaney / Future Publishing)

This article originally appeared on BikeRadar.

Russian squad Katusha is debuting Canyon's new Aeroad CF SLX at the Tour de France. Here we take a look at the team-spec machine of Yuri Trofimov.

The most notable difference between the team bike and stock is the absence of the integrated bar/stem on the team machines. While Canyon's retail bikes will have one-piece carbon cockpits — available in five stem lengths, with two bars widths for each — Katusha goes with the more practical Ritchey WCS bars and stem, usually in alloy.

The Aeroad CF SLX frame using a truncated airfoil shape that Canyon calls Trident 2.0. Based on the Trident airfoil shape used on Canyon's Speedmax time trial bike, the Aeroroad's Trident 2.0 tubing is based on a 2.6:1 ratio instead of the UCI-maximum 3:1.

As you'd expect with a new aero bike, Canyon claims aero gains over the bike's predecessor. Surprisingly, though, the down tube isn't hyper-slender; Canyon engineers found in iterative prototype testing that the front wheel generated so much air turbulence that they could make a relatively wide down tube without adding drag.

The Canyon Aeroad CF SLX has two front brakes. The bike has two direct-mount Shimano Dura-Ace callipers, but the rear is mounted where a normal rear calliper would sit, instead of the under-the-chainstays positions where a direct-mount calliper would go. Canyon claims mounting the rear calliper atop the frame, instead of tucked down by the bottom bracket, results in less overall drag since the frame shrouds the calliper this way.

The new Aeroad CF SLX gets a tapered 1.25in steerer tube, which should stiffen the front end over the original Aeroad.