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Farrar hopes for first Tour win in Paris

By:
Gregor Brown
Published:
July 26, 2009, 11:07 BST,
Updated:
July 26, 2009, 12:11 BST
Edition:
First Edition Cycling News, Sunday, July 26, 2009
Tyler Farrar (Garmin) tries to hold off Mark Cavendish in the sprint on stage 11.

Tyler Farrar (Garmin) tries to hold off Mark Cavendish in the sprint on stage 11.

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Paris' Champs Élysées last chance for American sprinter

The USA's Tyler Farrar has promised to try one last time to win a stage in this year's Tour de France. The race ends today with a flat sprinter-oriented stage into the country's capital of Paris.

"There is not another stage or worrying about classification for the next day, I think the team will be pretty committed to trying to set up the sprint," Farrar told Cyclingnews.

Farrar, 25, has yet to win a stage in his debut Tour de France. He placed second on stage two to Brignoles and stage 11 to Saint-Fargeau, and third on stage three to Issoudun. Mark Cavendish (Columbia-HTC) beat him on all three occasions, the British rider asserting himself as the dominant sprinter of this year's Tour with five wins.

"I have only got him once this year, but I am going to keep trying because I know it is possible. It will happen again eventually," said Farrar.

Farrar beat Cavendish and Italy's Alessandro Petacchi (LPR Brakes) in a stage of the Tirreno-Adriatico in March. He competed in his first three-week Grand Tour in May at the Giro d'Italia. He had several high placings in the Italian race, but Cavendish or Petacchi were able to foil him on each occasion. He left the Giro after 14 days of racing to prepare for the Tour de France.

"The Tour has been a chance to see how my body responds to everything. I think it has already been a successful Tour for me with my placings. A stage win would be nice and that is the goal on Sunday."

Farrar's Garmin-Slipstream squad are also competing for the overall classification. Brit Bradley Wiggins finished 10th on yesterday's stage to Mont Ventoux and is fourth overall. He is the highest placed British rider in 20 years, when Robert Millar finished 10th.
 

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