Danielson emerges from Twitter blackout after doping positive

American's career in limbo as anti-doping case awaits adjudication from USADA

Tom Danielson’s long-silent Twitter account has become active again as the controversial cyclist promotes the Cinch Cycling Camps in Arizona.

Danielson’s account was silent for more than three months after he used the social media platform on August 3 to announce USADA had informed him he tested positive for synthetic testosterone in an out-of-competition test.

Danielson has kept a low profile since he went public with the news in a series of Tweets on the eve of the Tour of Utah’s opening stage, remaining silent about the matter publicly and avoiding any media interviews.

That changed on November 19 when the 37-year-old American’s Twitter account came back to life with a link to a video promoting the Cinch camps.

Danielson’s racing career has been in limbo since he left the Tour of Utah before the race started in Logan. Cannondale-Garmin did not renew Danielson’s contract for next season, although USADA has yet to rule on the final outcome of Danielson’s case or officially sanction him.

VeloNews reported earlier this month that Danielson’s B sample had been tested and that it confirmed the results of the A test. The case is now in the hands of USADA’s anti-doping review board, which will render a decision after Danielson has the opportunity to present a defense.

USADA confirmed that Danielson's case is in adjudication but couldn't give Cyclingnews a timeline for when it would be resolved.

Danielson served a three-month suspension for his admissions as part of USADA's investigation into Lance Armstrong in 2012. He admitted to taking performance enhancing drugs including EPO up until 2006.

Although he hasn’t said anything publicly since the initial announcement, Danielson claimed in the August 3 tweets that he did not take any banned substances since returning from his earlier ban.

“I would never ever take anything like this especially after everything I have gone through the last years. This makes absolutely no sense,” Danielson wrote in August. “I will now, as I wait for the B test, have the supplements I take, tested to see if this is what caused it.”

“I feel incredibly hurt, frustrated and angry by this. I don't understand how or why this happened and still can't even accept this is true.”

None of the recent updates on Danielson’s Twitter account has mentioned his doping case, choosing instead to focus on the camps.

 

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