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Trek-Segafredo's custom Trek Checkpoints for Dirty Kanza – Gallery

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Kiel Reijnen's Trek Checkpoint SL for the Dirty Kanza

Kiel Reijnen's Trek Checkpoint SL for the Dirty Kanza
(Image credit: Trek)
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A closer look at the prayer flag design on Stetina's bike

A closer look at the prayer flag design on Stetina's bike
(Image credit: Trek)
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The prayer flags add colour to the white base coat on Stetina's frame

The prayer flags add colour to the white base coat on Stetina's frame
(Image credit: Trek)
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The front end of Riejnen's Checkpoint

The front end of Riejnen's Checkpoint
(Image credit: Trek)
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Cues from the pairs WorldTour bikes are included

Cues from the pairs WorldTour bikes are included
(Image credit: Trek)
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Riejnen's frameset features artwork from his home region in Washingtion

Riejnen's frameset features artwork from his home region in Washingtion
(Image credit: Trek)
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The Checkpoint framesets have been paired with SRAM RED eTap AXS drivetrains in a 1X setup

The Checkpoint framesets have been paired with SRAM RED eTap AXS drivetrains in a 1X setup
(Image credit: Trek)
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A look at the down tube on Stetina's frame

A look at the down tube on Stetina's frame
(Image credit: Trek)

Bike manufacturer Trek have presented Trek-Segafredo duo Peter Stetina and Kiel Reijnen with custom-painted Trek Checkpoint SL gravel-specific framesets for this weekend's Dirty Kanza 200-mile/320-kilometre gravel race.

Like the riders' Trek framesets used on the road in the WorldTour, both riders' bikes are equipped with SRAM RED eTap AXS groupsets in a 1X setup and Bontrager Aeolus wheels.

WorldTour professionals Taylor Phinney, Lachlan Morton and Alex Howes (EF Education First) will also be taking part in the amateur event.

The time-cut for the event is 20 hours, with the 2018 edition won by former professional Ted King in 10 hours and 44 minutes.

Reijnen's Trek Checkpoint design is a tribute to the Cowlitz Indian tribe, of which he is a member, and Bainbridge Island, Washington, where he is from.

The design features the tribe's symbol of a salmon and colour inspiration from nature and art seen in the region.

Stetina's frameset design features Tibetan Prayer Flags, which the American says have always had a special place in his life. Each of the prayer flags features a different design, including the flag of Colorado, the flag of California, an outline of Lake Tahoe, a hop flower and a Phoenix.

In a press release from Trek, Reijnen said: "Gravel riding and racing seems to be capturing a new generation of cyclists who are looking for adventure and experiences rather than measure performances. This attitude has drawn in a different crowd of relaxed, unique individuals to the sport and it makes for a very different vibe on race day.

"A race like Dirty Kanza isn’t just a race against other cyclists, it is a 10-hour race against yourself. I expect during those 10 hours I will feel excited, sore, fast, hungry, powerful, weak, lost and when I finish, a sense of accomplishment."

Stetina added: "The coolest thing is the equipment choice as the options are endless. Everyone has something different; there will bee points during the day where everyone has an advantage or disadvantage over others. It brings a new element to racing."

According to reports in VeloNews, both Stetina and Reijnen will complete the race with clip-on aero handlebars – a trend that is popular in ultra-endurance races. As an amateur event, the Dirty Kanza is not a UCI-sanctioned event and so the clip-on aero bars are permitted unlike in regular road racing where the bars are banned due to safety issues in a crash scenario.

Last year's Dirty Kanza winner, former professional Ted King, raised his concerns about the use of aero bars on Twitter, asking the Trek-Segafredo duo to not use the equipment.