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Sydney needs asthma volunteers for study

By:
Iker Rioja
Published:
September 21, 2007, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 20, 2009, 22:42 BST
Edition:
First Edition Cycling News for September 21, 2007

The University of Sydney (faculty of Health Science) and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital are conducting...

The University of Sydney (faculty of Health Science) and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital are conducting a research study on the effect of beta 2-agonists on exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in endurance trained people, and are looking for asthmatic athletes to participate in the study.

While numerous studies have highlighted the increased prevalence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in endurance-trained athletes, a condition which involves the use of inhaled b2-agonists bronchodilators, several studies, as well as clinical observations, report that daily use of b2-agonists bronchodilators might lead to tolerance to the protective effects of these drugs.

Tolerance can lead to delayed recovery from broncho-constriction. In an effort to improve understanding of the effect of chronic use of inhaled b2-agonists bronchodilators in EIA in the athletic population, researchers at the University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (Sydney) are conducting a study to determine the effects of different types of inhaled beta 2-agonists on bronchial reactivity.

Interested athletes 18 years of age or older who train a minimum of three times a week, and are currently taking asthma medications, are invited to participate. Participants will have access to some fundamental data regarding their asthma, including full lung function assessment as well as results of a bronchial challenge test. This information may assist in improving the control of their asthma.

All testing will be conducted at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine. Subjects will be given some financial support at the successful completion of the study.

For further information or to be included in the study please, contact the researchers: Dr Corinne Caillaud (c.caillaud@usyd.edu.au) or Clare Perry (clarep@med.usyd.edu.au or (02) 9515 6121).

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