Wiggins maintains silence amid growing questions

2012 Tour winner avoiding the press at Six Day London as former British Cycling head calls for more transparency from Team Sky

Organisers have made it clear that they do not expect Bradley Wiggins to meet with the media this week while he competes on the track at the Six Day London.

Speaking with the London Evening Standard ahead of the race, a Six Day London spokesperson said race organisers are "not expecting Brad to talk to the media during the event, but we are confident that he and the rest of the of the riders will get into the spirit this week." 

Wiggins and Team Sky have been in the spotlight since leaked medical data showed the five-time Olympic champion had been granted a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) by the UCI for the powerful steroid triamcinolone, which he was allowed to take before the 2011 Tour de France and 2013 Giro d'Italia, and also before winning the Tour in 2012.

Aside from two interviews, Wiggins has avoided speaking with the media, and he recently dropped out of a planned start of the Abu Dhabi Tour, which had been billed as his final road race of his career.

Wiggins' silence continues as former British Cycling CEO Peter King, who lead the governing body from 1997-2008, calls or more transparency from Team Sky, especially involving recent revelations that the UK Anti-Doping Agency (UKAD) is currently looking into a medical package that was delivered to the team by a British Cycling employee ahead of the Criterium du Dauphine in 2011.

Both Team Sky and Wiggins have denied any wrongdoing, but in an interview with ITV News, King called for more transparency.

"If it was perfectly innocent, then let's know about it," King told ITV. "It may be a question of using the rules to your best advantage, but I think it's still a case of living within the rules."

Wiggins, meanwhile, made it through the first night of competition at the Six Day London without granting any interviews. Following his gold medal at the Rio Olympic Games, Wiggins referred to the event as the perfect "lap of honour" for the most decorated British Olympian ever, but current events appear to be overshadowing his return to competition on British soil. On Tuesday, he placed third in the team elimination and was third in the Madison with fellow World Champion Mark Cavendish. 

Related Articles

Back to top