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The simple pleasures of Belgium

By:
Sean Babcock
Published:
December 31, 2010, 19:24 GMT,
Updated:
December 31, 2010, 19:29 GMT

Sean Babcock feels at home

'Cross campers gathering for Izegem Canal GP.

'Cross campers gathering for Izegem Canal GP.

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It’s cold, harsh, and unforgiving here in Belgium. It’s hard to feel comfortable in this environment. The tile floors are cold, as are the toilet seats. The bare gray bedroom walls are as depressing as the dark gloomy clouds. The propane heater at the course warms my backside, while my front is sacrificed to endure the freezing winds. It would be easier to remain in my down jacket, to stay in the heated van. Suiting up to ride the trainer in preparation for the race requires a mental effort.

But I like it. It feels like my parents’ house. Working a day in the wet Willamette Valley shoveling manure from the barn. Awakening to the site of my breath, wondering if anyone has stoked the wood stove.

I run from my warm blankets to huddle around the wood stove until the bathtub's open. If I've risen early enough, I'm rewarded with being the first to reuse the bath water. There’s not enough hot water for all my seven siblings to have their own shower or bath.

To survive in Belgium, like my home, one must find satisfaction in the simple things, whether it’s bumping into teammates while getting dressed in the muddy van trying to find dry floor space to stand, or washing the pots and pans while dancing to Euro techno. However, my favorite simple pleasure of Belgium is driving in the diesel-fumed vans with the mechanics, staff, and fellow riders.

Upon arrival to Belgium, a large white-haired man loaded our five bike cases and additional wheelsets into a battered, blue van. Settling into the front bucket seat, I noted the worn anterior and broken knobs on the dashboard. Diesel fumes penetrated my down jacket and wool hat, which were worn to accommodate for the insufficient heater.

As the Flemish-speaking man drove us down the highway through the rotten-smelling farm fields, I fought to hold back a smile. The smells, temperature, and images stimulated memories of driving in silence with my dad in his rickety gray pickup truck on a rainy day, peering out the foggy windows. All that was missing was some Van Morrison.

Back in the blue cycling van, I welcomed the fumes, the rough anterior, and the dreary conditions. I instantly felt comfortable in my new environment.

After the World Cup race in Zolder, I found myself again reminiscing about early memories of driving home after soccer games. I was sitting in the back seat of the old smelly van with three 'cross camp staff members, two Belgium spectators, and a pile of bicycle equipment. As I stared out the window, I laughed silently to myself, remembering being curled up in the back seat of the old three-speed Suburban packed to the ceiling with wet soccer equipment and seven teammates after a weekend tournament.

I'm sweaty, hungry, and tired. My mind is too spent to keep up with the conversations. I'm content to simply wipe a circle in the foggy window and stare into the distance - completely relaxed. As I sat in the back of the cycling van tuning out the Flemish conversation and unconcerned with our destination, I revisited this comfortable place.

It’s fascinating how familiar smells, images, textures, temperatures, and colors can stimulate old memories. The similarities between Belgium and my home have enabled me to rediscover these memorable moments, these simple pleasures. I feel comfortable here in Belgium. There are parts I wish I could bring home.

Author
Euro 'Cross Camp VIII

This year's Euro 'Cross Camp will feature a total of 20 riders including four elite, seven under 23 and nine junior cyclo-cross racers. Some of the riders are veterans of previous camps while others are new. It is the eighth year that Camp Director Geoff Proctor is taking young (mostly) American cyclo-crossers over to Europe to gain more experience racing in and near Belgium. The opportunity gives them the chance to experience cyclo-cross at its highest level with races at two World Cups. They'll also get to compete in several national-level events. "Domestic racing is great, but you still have to go to Europe for the highest levels. If you want to be the best in the world, you have to go race the best," said Proctor, who is a school teacher in Montana. He's also a member of the UCI's Cyclo-cross Commission. Riders will arrive on Thursday or Friday, December 16 or 17 and depart just after the New Year. Expect daily blogs from the riders on their vacation adventures. Euro Cross Camp VIII Roster Elite men Sean Babcock, 28, (Kona) Ryan Knapp, 27, (BikeReg.com) Ryan Iddings, 27, (Redline) Mitchell Hoke, 23, (Cliff Bar Development Team) U23 men Danny Summerhill, 22, (Garmin-Holowesko) Jerome Townsend, 22, (BikeReg.com/Joe’s Garage/Scott) Steve Fisher, 21, (Rad Racing NW/Hagens-Berman) Chris Hurst, 21, (Unattached) Joe Schmalz, 21, (KCCX/Verge/Challenge) Zach McDonald, 20, (Rapha/Focus Cyclocross Team) Cody Kaiser, 19, (California Giant/Specialized) Junior men Yannick Eckmann, 18, (Hot Tubes Development Team) Jeff Bahnson, 18, (Van Dessel Factory Team) Gunnar Bergey, 18, (C3-Athletes Serving Athletes) Bjorn Fox, 18, (Clif Bar Development Team) Kolben Preble, 18, (Clif Bar Development Team) Jeremiah Dyer, 18, (Champion Systems/Cannondale) Zane Godby, 17, (Clif Bar Development Team) Cypress Gorry, 17, (WEB-OP) Andrew Dillman, 17, (Red Zone Cycling) Euro Cross Camp VIII Race Program (subject to change) Wednesday-Friday, December 15-17: Riders travel to camp Saturday, December 18: Lichtervelde Sunday, December 19: UCI World Cup-Kalmthout Sunday, December 19: Maldegem Wednesday, December 22: Team Training Race (Ardooieveld) Saturday, December 25: Beernem Sunday, December 26: UCI World Cup-Zolder Sunday, December 26: Balagem Monday, December 27: Super Prestige-Diegem Wednesday, December 29: Azencross GVA-Loenhout Thursday, December 30: Sylvester Cyclocross-Bredene Saturday, January 1: GP Sven Nys GVA-Baal

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