Ewan continues top-ten run at Giro d'Italia

Orica-Scott escape Sardinia with no time losses for Adam Yates

Eighth place in Cagliari on stage 3 of the Giro d'Italia saw Caleb Ewan continue his run of top-ten results after Quick-Step Floors blew the race to pieces in the crosswinds. While sprint rival Fernando Gaviria took out the win and with it the pink jersey, the Orica-Scott rider won the bunch sprint 13 seconds later.

Coming into his second Giro off the back of two-second places at the Tour de Yorkshire, Ewan won the bunch sprint on stage 1 behind Lukas Postelberger (Bora-Hansgrohe) to finish a narrow second on stage 1 in Olbia. In position to take the win on stage 2, Ewan pulled his foot from the pedal to finish ninth. Stage 3 offered an immediate shot at redemption after the previous day's 'devastating' result it was Quick-Step Floors blocking the 22-year-old's path to glory.

Sports director Matt White explained when the Belgian team took advantage of the crosswinds, his Orica-Scott riders were caught out.

"We all knew the point the winds were coming but there was just one team who got better organised than anyone, had the numbers, and made the race," sport director Matt White said. "They earned that win. It was chaotic, everyone was fighting for the front but we just didn't get where we needed to be."

White added that despite being caught out and missing the opportunity to sprint for victory with Ewan, he was pleased that there was no time loss for the team's GC leader Adam Yates.

"From there, we were trying to support both Caleb and Adam Yates. Adam actually did a really good job for a small guy to be in the second split when it first went."

With the riders to enjoy a rest day in Sicily Monday, Ewan is unlikely to continue his run of top-ten results when racing resumes at the Giro on Tuesday as the peloton makes it ways to Mount Etna. On the stage up the volcano, Orica-Scott will be backing Yates in the first real test for the GC men.

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