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Operación Puerto News for July 2, 2006

Date published:
July 02, 2006, 1:00 BST
  • Quesada suspended by Unibet

    Article published:
    July 02, 2006, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Hedwig Kröner and Jeff Jones

    Unibet.com has suspended Carlos Garcia Quesada, who was named in Operacion Puerto case on Friday....

    Unibet.com has suspended Carlos Garcia Quesada, who was named in Operacion Puerto case on Friday. "Until we have more information from the UCI, we won't let Quesada compete," said team manager Hilaire Van Der Schueren on the team's website. In the selection for the Tour of Austria, Quesada is being replaced by Matthew Wilson.

  • Lissavetsky: "Anti-doping law not just against cycling"

    Article published:
    July 02, 2006, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Hedwig Kröner and Jeff Jones

    The new Spanish anti-doping law is not aimed specifically at cyclists, according to the country's...

    The new Spanish anti-doping law is not aimed specifically at cyclists, according to the country's State Sports Secretary Jaime Lissavetsky. "This new Law is not against the cycling, but against doping," Lissavetsky was quoted by EFE as saying on Friday.

    Although some 200 athletes (from track and field, basketball, tennis and football) are said to be implicated in Operacion Puerto, only 31 (of 58) cyclists have been named so far. Lissavetsky said that he is not aware of the names of any athletes from outside cycling yet. "There exists a report from the Guardia Civil which talks about cyclists, and from it, they could be identified according to the presumed plot...

    "We did all that was asked of us. The French minister requested an official report from us on Operacion Puerto, and we have fulfilled this with great speed since the information leaked. It is necessary to discern between the criminal aspect on the one hand, and the cyclists on the other. The UCI has taken a decision which I cannot enter into."

    Courtesy of Antonio J. Salmerón

  • Basso: "I'm no fugitive"

    Article published:
    July 02, 2006, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Hedwig Kröner and Jeff Jones

    The should-have-been star of the 2006 Tour, after being linked to the doping network around...

    The should-have-been star of the 2006 Tour, after being linked to the doping network around incriminated haematologist Dr Fuentes, has left France and returned to his home in Italy on Friday afternoon. Ivan Basso has been suspended by his team director Bjarne Riis, for the good of his team and to give the Giro d'Italia winner time to prove his innocence.

    Contacted by the Gazzetta dello Sport, the former leader of Team CSC was feeling angry, but composed. Asked if he was aware of the fact that his departure from the team hotel through the back door looked like he was fleeing, Basso denied. "I didn't run away, I'm no fugitive," he said. "I was suspended by my team and I did what I had to do. Besides, there is nothing official yet. No judicial institution has informed me of anything. Neither has the UCI or the Guardia Civil. It's an abnormal situation - I found myself in the centre of attention for something I have nothing to do with. To me it's embarrassing to face the television cameras."

    Basso will now confer with his lawyer Massimo Martinelli. "I'm sure I'll get out of this as I'm innocent," he added. "[Bjarne Riis] has complete faith in me and waits for me with open arms.

    "I've lived through worst times in my life. Two years ago I was at the Tour knowing that my mother was dying of cancer - this is nothing compared to that. I'm sure that I will get out of this with my head held high. I'll soon come back to race and to win," he concluded calmly.

  • 38 pages of circumstantial evidence

    Article published:
    July 02, 2006, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Hedwig Kröner and Jeff Jones

    Coming up on Cyclingnews will cover the 96th Scheldeprijs Vlaanderen - 1.HC live on April 15 at...

    It's on the basis of a 38-page thick abstract of the original Spanish judiciary document of 500 pages that the Tour de France officials and the concerned team managers took the decision, yesterday morning, to take some of their riders out of their race rosters and suspend them with immediate effect. A hard decision for everyone involved, but one that certainly relied on hard facts, too, which will slowly but steadily come out to the public now.

    The allegations are as follows:

    On Ivan Basso: In a telephone conversation on May 14, 2006, at 21.46, between Ignacio Labarta and Eufemiano Fuentes, Labarta links Basso and José Ignacio Gutierrez to Fuentes, apparently identifying them as his clients. The affirmation of the relationship between Basso and Fuentes leads to the code name "Birillo" and consequently to the number two of the blood samples.

    On Jan Ullrich: The surname "Jan" appears four times in document 32, where it is linked to a list of code-named products, which are: blood, growth hormone, IGF-I (growth factor) and testosterone.

    On Ullrich and Basso: The document 65, which features the logo of Biomedisport Canarias SA, a company administrated by Fuentes, contains a list of the "collaborators and participants of the festival in May". This seems to refer to the Giro d'Italia, in which the following riders included in the list took part: Ivan Basso, Marcos Serrano, Michele Scarponi, José Enrique Gutierrez, and Jan Ullrich. The same documents seems to establish the relationship between these five riders and the activities of the group of Fuentes.

    On Francisco Mancebo: In the search of Ignacio Labarta's home were found documents entitled "Information on Mancebo's effort test", as well as documents about his annual race program with symbols on drugs and blood transfusions, which point towards a direct relationship between Francisco Mancebo...