TechPowered By

More tech

MTB News & racing round-up for September 7, 2005, part 1

Date published:
September 07, 2005, 1:00 BST
  • UCI announces changes in 2006 World Cup

    Article published:
    September 07, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Rob Jones

    By Rob Jones The UCI Mountain Bike Commission, headed by President Daniel Baal, held an hour long...

    By Rob Jones

    The UCI Mountain Bike Commission, headed by President Daniel Baal, held an hour long briefing conference this morning to discuss numerous changes that will be implemented for the sport of mountain biking, starting in 2006. The briefing was wide ranging, covering everything from the World Cup, to new ranking systems, Olympic qualification and age categories.

    2006 World Cup

    The UCI has been working with 23 Degrees Sports Management (Martin Whitely) and Gestev (Canadian organizers of World Cups and world championships) to outsource the management of the World Cup, but doesn't feel the arranegement has been a success.

    "The World Cup is the high point of the mountain bike season, but we regret that there have been no sponsors or TV program for the last two seasons," said Baal. "In 2004 we talked to the organization (23 Degrees and Gestev) about outsourcing management of the World Cup for 2006. For this year they had the possibility (of taking charge of the World Cup), and worked for one year. They did not have success. Despite a lot of effort and energy, there were not sufficient guarantees to start the agreement for 2006. Unfortunately, the marketplace and the economic conditions do not show the (required) interest in this program.

    The UCI has another solution. “We will continue to manage the World Cup in conjunction with organizers," said Baal. "There will be six events in each specialty (cross-country, marathon, downhill, 4-cross). The schedule will be announced at the latest by October 1st. We have to face the economic realities."

    Subsequent to the briefing, Cyclingnews spoke with Gestav co-owner Patrice Drouin who said his management team have had only 7 months (not 1 year) to work on the series and that they do have a 2006 distribution agreement in place - which will cover distribution to 100 countries – but it is not yet signed.

    Drouin said that the...

  • Chris Eatough: 24-Hour lone gunman & six-time world champion

    Chris Eatough (centre)
    Article published:
    September 07, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Steve Medcroft

    By Steve Medcroft At 12:08 p.m. Sunday, Chris Eatough claimed his sixth consecutive 24 Hours of...

    By Steve Medcroft

    At 12:08 p.m. Sunday, Chris Eatough claimed his sixth consecutive 24 Hours of Adrenalin World Solo Championship. The Trek/VW endurance star said this year’s race was more challenging than all the others before it. He explained why to CyclingNews’ Steve Medcroft while traveling to Mammoth Mountain, California, where he’ll try for the U.S. National Marathon Championship on September 15.

    Cyclingnews: You’ve won six straight 24-Hour World Championships. What is about this race or this format that keeps you coming back?

    Chris Eatough: Because this is the kind of race I made my career on. Plus my sponsors like it; it’s the race Trek wants me to do. And 24 hours is still an emerging discipline. If it grows - if we get some TV coverage or the kind of recognition that an event like the Ironman (Triathlon series) does - I’d like to be here and be at the top when it does.

    CN: You’ve done more cross-country and marathon-format racing this year. Did it affect your preparation for 24 Hour Worlds?

    CE: Doing more marathon racing did change my prep. I thought marathons would be good for me but they just weren’t as long as I expected; I did a lot of three and a half hour races when I really needed six or seven hours. I developed some speed but for 24 hours, you need longer training rides. So this year (in 2005 Worlds), I lacked a little durability and strength.

    CN: You’ve become somewhat famous for fast pits and methodical preparation (Eatough spends less than three minutes at any one time in a pit and in six World Championships has suffered only one mechanical issue; a flat tire). Where did the approach come from and did you change anything this year?

    CE: My dad and I came up with a lot of the original thought on how to be efficient –...

  • UCI Mountain Bike World Championships wrap up

    Article published:
    September 07, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Steve Medcroft

    By Steve Medcroft The 2005 Mountain Bike World Championships was a showcase for the best in the...

    By Steve Medcroft

    The 2005 Mountain Bike World Championships was a showcase for the best in the world to prove why they’re the best. Defending Champions and Olympic Gold medalists Gunn Rita-Dahle (Norway) and Julien Absalon (France) reclaimed the Cross Country titles on Sunday. Former multi-time downhill winner Anne Caroline Chaussen snuck off with one more World Championship jersey before retiring. Frenchman Fabien Barel, after winning his National Championship and the European Championship already in 2005, took care of business in the men’s downhill.

    The exceptions to the show of European dominance came from a pair of Americans (Brian Lopes and Jill Kintner) winners in the Four Cross competition. Kintner earned her first World Championship jersey and former Champion Lopes was just back to World Championship competition after two years lost to injuries. Here’s a quick run down of the action:

    Cross country

    The women’s Cross Country field might as well get used to coming second to Gunn Rita-Dahle. The Merida/Multivan pro recently said in her Cyclingnews diary that she’s signed a six-year deal with her sponsors and is committed to at least three more years of racing; she intends to defend her gold medal in the 2008 Beijing. Since she’s won about 80 percent of her major races and 100 percent of her championship attempts in 2005 (Word Cup, Marathon and European and now World Championships), every other woman in racing better think solely on how they’re going to unseat the Norwegian if they want to place better than second place.

    Dahle put her phenomenal dominance on display at the UCI World Championship races this past weekend, opening a thirty-five second gap on her chasers in the first of two and a half laps and never giving a second of time back. “Today was a perfect day for me,” she...