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Latest Cycling News for September 14, 2005

Date published:
September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
  • Rasmussen auction for Katrina victims

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    Danish Tour de France king of the mountains, Michael Rasmussen, is putting up a complete cycling...

    Danish Tour de France king of the mountains, Michael Rasmussen, is putting up a complete cycling outfit with his autograph for auction to support the victims of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. The outfit is similar to the one Michael Rasmussen wore when he won the mountains competition in this year's Tour de France, and it consists of a jersey, cycling shorts, gloves and leg warmers with the characteristic polka dots.

    All proceeds from the auction will be donated to the International Red Cross' fundraising for the victims of New Orleans. Read more about the disaster and the fundraising at www.redcross.org/.

    How to make a bid:

    In order to make a bid for the complete racing outfit signed by Michael Rasmussen you have to send an email to info@feltet.dk in which you state:

    The amount (minimum bid €1000)
    Your complete address (remember to include country)
    Your phone number

    Once you have sent your bid, you will receive a mail telling you that your bid has been registered (it might take a while since all bids are handled personally by our webmaster). Please note that your bid is binding. You will be able to follow the rate of the highest bid on feltet.dk. The auction runs until September 21, 2005 at 12 o'clock GMT. The outfit will go to the person with the highest bid at that time.

    More information: www.feltet.dk/michaelrasmussen/article.php?17.255

  • Grafton to Inverell revs up

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    The preparations are complete for Saturday's Eastmon Digital Photo Stores Grafton to Inverell Cycle...

    The preparations are complete for Saturday's Eastmon Digital Photo Stores Grafton to Inverell Cycle Classic, considered by many to be Australia's toughest one day road race. 200 cyclists will tackle the 228km course starting in Prince Street, Grafton at around 7:30am, and the first riders will finish in Otho Street, Inverell around 2:30pm.

    The combined B, C and D Grades along with 16 women competitors will be the first to leave at 7:30. This combined group will contain over 150 riders with 31 in B grade, 55 for C grade and D grade will have 52 riders. Riders ranging from 20 years old to 71 year old Peter Brown from Port Macquarie make up the record field. Ambitions at the start line vary from taking a prestigious victory in the A Grade elite race to finishing in a personal best time. In the case of 1974 winner, Bryan Ferris from Queensland, it will be taking part in his 24th race. Ferris' aim is to be the rider with the most starts in the Classic's history. All these riders are what make the Grafton to Inverell the race all Australian cyclists want to ride, even if it is only once.

    Newly crowned Australian National Club Champion Peter Herzig from Queensland will be one of the favourites in the Eastmon Digital A Grade. Herzig won the title last Saturday on the Sunshine Coast of Queensland, beating Joe McDonnell and 2004 Grafton to Inverell winner Peter McDonald, both from Sydney. National U/23 title winner Simon Clarke (Vic) will also in the A grade and will be looking to follow in the footsteps of the fourteen previous winners from Victoria. Top NSW riders such as Klayten Smith, Ben Brooks and Trent Wilson will be out to take the win in their state's premier race. Wilson, along with South Australian Russell Van Hout, have just returned from Italy where they have been racing with Colombia Selle Italia on the pro circuit, and will surely be amongst the favourites to be on the podium in Inverell.

  • Revamped format for Jayco-Herald Sun Tour

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    The 54th Jayco-Herald Sun Tour, a UCI 2.1 stage race, will be run between October 9-15 in Victoria,...

    The 54th Jayco-Herald Sun Tour, a UCI 2.1 stage race, will be run between October 9-15 in Victoria, Australia. With new organisers this year, the race route has been redesigned following feedback from Australia's top riders. The aim was to create a seven day tour with a single stage per day, building in intensity towards the finish. Tour director Michael Hands believes he has done that.

    "We have also 'borrowed' some of the hallmarks of the great European cycling events, including a team time trial to open the tour, an arduous uphill individual time trial and public participation events to broaden the connection between the elite cyclists and the weekend warrior who can only dream of chasing the yellow jersey in a major tour," said Hands. "We have magnificent support from our tour partners and supporters including the Herald Sun, Jayco, Regional Development Victoria, and VicHealth through the Go for your Life campaign, we are confident that his year's event will excite the riders and fans."

    Public events planned

    This year's Jayco-Herald Sun Tour will include a Gran Fondo, a cycling tradition in Italy. Gran Fondos are designed for both the serious and recreational rider, and some of the great names of cycling have their own Gran Fondo, such as the Fausto Coppi Gran Fondo, the Pinarello Gran Fondo and the Campagnolo Gran Fondo. The Jayco-Herald Sun Tour features the Go for your Life Gran Fondo, which will be staged on Thursday, October 13 in the Yarra Valley, covering the same roads as the fifth and hardest road stage of the race. It starts and finishes in Healesville, and takes in vineyards, forests, demanding climbs and descents.

    But wait, there's more. Stage 6 is an individual time trial up Mt Dandenong, from the start in Monbulk to the finish at SkyHigh Mount Dandenong. Before the pro riders take off on what may be the deciding stage of the race, the 11 km course will be open to any rider who wants to tackle Melbourne's most...

  • Glomser contemplates retiring

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    Austrian Gerrit Glomser is thinking of retiring, after being informed by Lampre that he wouldn't be...

    Austrian Gerrit Glomser is thinking of retiring, after being informed by Lampre that he wouldn't be offered a new contract, reports Austrian TV broadcaster ORF. The 30-year old Glomser dropped out of the Vuelta and has given up his place on the World Championships team.

    Glomser's manager Toni Rominger is investigating possibilities for him, but Glomser said, "When I start somewhere, then I set high goals. I don't believe I can accomplish these goals if I'm not on the right team. Either I will take something that fulfills my expectations or I will retire from the sport as an active cyclist."

    He puts the chances of continuing his career at 40 percent.

    Courtesy of Susan Westemeyer

  • Ulmer to miss World's

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    New Zealander rider Sarah Ulmer will bypass the Road Cycling World Championships in Madrid, Spain...

    New Zealander rider Sarah Ulmer will bypass the Road Cycling World Championships in Madrid, Spain next week due to a stomach virus that has compromised the last stages of her build up. Ulmer didn't want to attend the biggest event of the year unless she was able to compete on a level playing field, and it has now become evident this won't be possible. "I have unfortunately suffered from a stomach virus for the past 3 weeks which has hampered my final preparation to the extent I don't believe I would be able to compete much above 60 percent of my ability in Madrid," she said.

    "Even though Madrid was very much a lead up to my targeted races in 2006, I love competing for New Zealand and was really looking forward to racing at the top level again. I will just have to wait a few more months now for a return to major international competition."

    Ulmer's focus remains on her main objective for 2005, which is qualification and preparation for the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne. "I hope to resume normal training within a week, and from there qualification for the Commonwealth Games next March. I am continuing to work with Bike NZ High Performance Director Michael Flynn on what I need to do to qualify, and this all remains very much on track."

    Michael Flynn and the New Zealand National Road Coach Jacques Landry supported Ulmer's decision: "Unfortunately elite athletes are exposed to illness and injury from time to time," they said. "We certainly didn't want Sarah racing if her preparation has been compromised. Our full attention with Sarah now shifts to qualification for and then competition in the Melbourne Commonwealth Games in March."

  • Irish team announced for World's

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Cycling News

    By Shane Stokes Cycling Ireland yesterday announced the composition of the Grant Thornton-backed...

    By Shane Stokes

    Cycling Ireland yesterday announced the composition of the Grant Thornton-backed Team Ireland squad which will represent the country in the world road race championships in Madrid next week. Philip Deignan will hope to build on his fine debut pro season and the fifth place he achieved in the European championships in Austria earlier this summer when he leads the charge in the Under 23 road race. He will be supported by Paídi O'Brien, Andrew McQuaid, Miceal Concannon and Ryan Connor in his bid for a medal.

    Former world junior champion Mark Scanlon will line out in the Elite road race alongside fellow professionals David McCann and David O'Loughlin, the current Irish road race champion. The latter will be the country's sole entrant in the time trial events. All three have been in good form of late, with O'Loughlin winning the Mengoni GP and Scanlon taking second on a stage of the Tour de L'Avenir.

    Siobhan Dervan's good season racing in Belgium sees her represent Ireland in the Elite women's road race. She met CI's criteria for selection earlier this month when she finished seventh in the Wielsbeke Grand Prix and she is hoping to ride well in her first world championship.

    "A lot of people believe this team will do a great job in Madrid and I would certainly agree with that," said CI President Miceal Concannon at the launch. "I am very excited about this lineup. This it is the strongest Irish selection in many years."

    Team sponsor Gearoid Costelloe of Grant Thornton was similarly optimistic. "This is a very strong squad and I think they will do us all proud," he said.

  • Boonen agrees with World's selection

    Article published:
    September 14, 2005, 1:00 BST
    By:
    Shane Stokes

    "I'm not a 100 percent satisfied, but let's say 98 percent," Tom Boonen gave his opinion to Het...

    "I'm not a 100 percent satisfied, but let's say 98 percent," Tom Boonen gave his opinion to Het Laatste Nieuws about the Belgian team selection for the World Championships. "I would have liked to have Rik Verbrugghe there; in the Vuelta he chose to finish in the bus for three days because he wants to save himself for two other stages. De Cauwer interpreted that wrongly; Verbrugghe's still in very good shape.

    "To have five of my team mates would have been an exaggeration, but two is not enough really. The problem is that Kevin Hulsmans' form is improving daily, but the WC comes too early for him. And about Kevin De Weert, you can say a few things too, but anyway, I'm not going to bring the selection into discredit. It is what it is.

    "I would take the experienced Peter Van Petegem as my last locomotive, rather than Philippe Gilbert. To set up a train will be very difficult. In the last corner I need two men there. I was consulted by De Cauwer very late in the selection process. That could have been better indeed, but I'm happy that he made the decision. I could have beaten my fist on the table, but that's just not how I am."

    Davitamon-Lotto's Marc Sergeant said doesn't want any further discussion about the selection. "Of course I would prefer to see Van Petegem become world champion, but I'd be more than happy with McEwen too," Sergeant told Het Nieuwsblad. "But Boonen's OK also. Rather Tom than an Italian or Spanish rider. I mean that and I stick to that statement.

    "A National coach has to be smart enough to avoid hurting anyone and still keep the sponsors in mind (Davitamon also sponsors the Belgian Federation). The sponsor pays the team for a whole year and backs a team. With something like that all-important rainbow jersey in mind, that of course plays in the rider's head too. You can't let them ride against each other fair and square. That's the skill of a good national coach: he has to draw the line very...