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Latest Cycling News for November 22, 2005

Date published:
November 22, 2005, 0:00 GMT
  • Jittery Joe's-Zero Gravity 2006

    Article published:
    November 22, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    John Stevenson

    A few new faces, along with some returners, will be pushing pedals and coffee around North America...

    A few new faces, along with some returners, will be pushing pedals and coffee around North America next season for the Jittery Joe's-Zero Gravity team. Returning to the squad is Australian sprinter Jeff Hopkins, along with Evan Elken and Craig Wilcox. New faces to the team include Australian Trent Wilson from Colombia-Selle Italia, Neil Shirley from Seasilver, Phil Wong from Fiordifrutta, Austin King from the Belgian Cycle Center, Marc Anderson from Loco's Deli and Pub and neo-pro Peter Hatton from Australia.

    "We are really excited about our new additions for next year, " said Micah Rice, General Manager. "We have Trent Wilson who has finished the Giro the last couple of years and neo-pro Peter Hatton who won the KOM jersey and finished 5th overall in Australia's Sun Tour last month.

    Another addition of note is former Jittery Joe's pro Jesse Lawler who will be working as the team director in 2006. "Jesse was my team-mate on Zaxby's before riding with Jittery Joe's for all four years," said Micah Rice, "it is a perfect situation because we already know how each other work and he has a lot of experience to bring to the staff side of the table."

    2006 Jittery Joe's-Zero Gravity Roster

    Jeff Hopkins
    Evan Elken
    Craig Wilcox
    Trent Wilson
    Neil Shirley
    Marc Anderson
    Phil Wong
    Peter Hatton
    Austin King

  • Pearce hired as USA Cycling track coach

    Article published:
    November 22, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    John Stevenson

    USA Cycling has hired all-round track and road racer Colby Pearce as its new endurance track coach....

    USA Cycling has hired all-round track and road racer Colby Pearce as its new endurance track coach. The 33-year-old 2004 Olympian will be involved in all phases of the endurance track program, including working with the elite men's and women's programs, the under-23 program, and developing junior racers, the organisation announced this morning.

    Pearce has worked for the last year with the TIAA-CREF team as a rider/coach. "[He] has brought a number of athletes and top road talent to the track," USA Cycling director of track cycling Pat McDonough said. "We hope he can take us to the next level."

    McDonough and USA Cycling intend that Pearce will help to attract road cyclists to the track. To that end he will run camps in Los Angeles and Colorado Springs to educate and develop road cyclists into track riders.

    "It seemed like a natural transition," Pearce said. "I've been leaning in the direction (of coaching) over the last year with TIAA-CREF, passing on what I learned to younger riders, and then this was the perfect opportunity. The track program needs an overhaul, but with the programs Pat has enacted and the hiring of Gary West (head track coach), all of the key components are in place for a competitive track program."

    Earlier this month, Pearce retired from professional racing, ending his career with a silver medal in the points race at the UCI Track World Cup in Moscow. During his 17-year career, Pearce has won 9 national championships, 11 World Cup medals (including 3 victories), and holds the US 10 km record on the track.

    Pearce now takes the helm of the endurance track program that has been without a coach since 2000.

  • San Francisco city supervisor responds to San Fran GP cancellation

    Article published:
    November 22, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    John Stevenson

    by Mark Zalewski A San Francisco City supervisor has accused the organisers of the San Francisco...

    by Mark Zalewski

    A San Francisco City supervisor has accused the organisers of the San Francisco Grand Prix of "looking for an easy way out" in blaming city politics for the cancellation of the 2006 edition of the race. That's "the reality" of the situation, according to San Francisco Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin.

    Peskin told Cyclingnews that he had initially supported the race, even so far as to push legislation through to make it financially viable to organiser San Francisco Cycling, LLC -- something that Peskin says has never been offered to an event promoter before. "I'm uniquely positioned because I got them the legislation that got them the race. They have been more than fairly treated. No other institution has gotten this kind of a deal."

    In a statement issued by San Francisco Cycling, managing partner David Chauner said, "There is considerable uncertainty regarding the amounts we will be billed after each year's race, making it impossible to accurately forecast budgets or question charges beforehand. On top of that, the periodic, emotionally charged Board of Supervisors' debates over the value of the event make potential sponsors very nervous. Few companies will sponsor a politically charged event and, when sponsors back out or can't be replaced, we have to cut important elements of the race, like eliminating the very popular women's event this year."

    In response to this Peskin replied, "They got a massive subsidy -- well over one million over five years. They were the only ones to get that, and we welcomed them with open arms. But the fact is they paid their bills between eight and fourteen months late. One year they were subsidised 100 percent!" Peskin went on to cite numerous other events which have been successful for many years without subsidies or waivers from the city. "The marathon pays 100 cents on the dollar, and AEG is coming in with the Tour of California and paying for it all."

    One of...