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First Edition Cycling News, Saturday, December 29, 2012

Date published:
December 29, 2012, 10:00
  • Sir Paul Smith to design 2013 maglia rosa

    The newly-designed maglia rosa for the 2011 Giro d'Italia.
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 09:43
    By:
    Cycling News

    Unveiling set for January in Milan

    British designer Sir Paul Smith will put his stamp on one of the most famous cycling jerseys in 2013 with organisers of the Giro d'Italia announcing that the man best-known for his menswear and suiting will unveil his version of the maglia rosa next month.

    The world's fashion capital, Milan, will play host the Smith's reveal. He previously designed a special shirt for the prologue of the 2007 Tour de France which started in Britain and has amassed a considerable collection of cycling jerseys and memorabilia.

    Smith is a noted cycling fan and follows in the footsteps of Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbanna, which has been given the opportunity on several occasions.

    Smith has been working with UK-based cycling accessory retailer Rapha since 2007 and it's rumoured that he has had input in the design of the kit developed for Team Sky, with the company taking over from Adidas for the next four years.

    The official unveiling of the Paul Smith maglia rosa will take place at his store in Milan on January 14.

     

  • Dekker, Wauters deny doping whilst riding for Rabobank

    2004 winner Erik Dekker (Rabobank)
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 10:36
    By:
    Cycling News

    Sport Directors rode for Dutch team in early 2000s

    Erik Dekker and Marc Wauters have both denied having used doping whilst riding for Rabobank. Both are now sports directors with WorldTour teams, and made the denials in light of allegations made by an anonymous former Rabobank rider and details which have emerged from the USADA reasoned decision in the Lance Armstong case.

    Levi Leipheimer discussed his doping use during his time with Rabobank, in his affidavit in the USADA case, saying he was assisted by a team doctor. Last weekend, NOS television said that an anonymous retired Rabobank rider described doping on the team, starting in 1999, with Dekker's name being mentioned.

    The Dutch cycling federation is conducting an investigation into the past doping practices, and Dekker, a sport director with the Blanco team, told the Algemeen Dagblad, “If I were called for an inquiry, I will gladly go there. What I have to say I do not have to share with the readers of the AD. I have nothing to confess. Have I ever used doping? No!”

    Dekker, no relation to cyclist Thomas Dekker, was forced to pause for several weeks for “health reasons” late in the 1999 season when his haematocrit level tested too high, but he said that had nothing to do with doping.

    "It's always the same. The cycling world has accused me so often. In 1999, I was nothing and in 2000, Dekker won three stages in the Tour. Anyone can add that up. That's scoreboard journalism.

    "You may wonder whether the anonymous source who accuses me is telling the truth, or whether he has his own truth?"

    Dekker rode for Rabobank from 1996 to 2006, and served as a sport director for the team, to be known as Blanco Pro Cycling Team next year, since 2007.  Wauters was with Rabobank from 1998 to 2006, and is a sport director for Lotto Belisol.

    "It is painful to read. I can only confirm that I've never taken drugs,” he told the Gazet van Antwerpen.

  • Armstrong nominated as Texan of the Year

    Lance Armstrong (US Postal) at the start of the 1999 Amstel Gold
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 11:27
    By:
    Cycling News

    Dallas newspaper calls him “a fighter, a survivor and a cunning, steely-eyed liar”

    Lance Armstrong has been nominated for Texan of the Year – but not as a sterling example of the Lone Star State's population. The Dallas Morning News has nominated him for its award as a top newsmaker who has had a great impact.

    Armstrong’s crash to Earth in 2012, with all its painful reverberations, leaves a Texas-size crater that qualifies him as a finalist for this year’s distinction. His fall wasn’t pleasant to behold,” the newspaper said in an editorial. “If nothing else, it’s a lesson about the perils of hero worship.”

    The title is one which does not necessarily reflect well on the recipient. “The Dallas Morning News Texan of the Year is a distinction we bestow for impact, be it for better or for worse. It reflects the prominence of what Texans do, not what we’d prefer them to do.”

    Armstrong, a lifelong resident of Texas, first came to notice in the state as a teenage triathlete. He enthralled millions of Texans and fans around the world as he came back from cancer to win seven consecutive Tours de France, and raised millions of dollars from this Livestrong Foundation.

    But the legend came to an end in 2012. “This year came the epic fall, a legacy imploded in weeks. The head of the U.S. anti-doping agency revealed him as a serial cheat, the enforcer of 'the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.' Sponsors abandoned Armstrong. Nike said he misled the company for a decade.

    “Now the Armstrong brand will forever be that of a fighter, a survivor and a cunning, steely-eyed liar.”

  • AFLD hopeful it can contribute to testing at 2013 Tour de France

    A Tour de France fan states his case for cessation of doping in the professional peloton
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 13:30
    By:
    Cycling News

    Genevois on whistleblowers and Aicar test

    French Anti-Doping Agency (AFLD) president Bruno Genevois is hopeful that his agency can work alongside the UCI and carry out testing at the 2013 Tour de France, although he noted that no firm decisions on anti-doping protocol for next year can be taken until after the UCI Independent Commission completes its review of the governing body’s activities.

    “For now, the UCI is in a waiting position,” Genevois told L’Équipe. “We would like to have a strategy with upstream controls, blood and urine samples, and specific searches. All the same, the UCI has had the merit of putting in place the biological passport since 2008, and has been able to establish instances of doping and hand out penalties.

    “I have been able to keep up contact with the UCI, whereas I have struggled to establish continued contact with the International Tennis Federation. In the field of the fight against the doping, there are many who believe but too few who practice.”

    The AFLD provided documentation and test results to the US Anti-Doping Agency as part of its investigation into doping at the US Postal Service team, but the case against Lance Armstrong also relied heavily on testimony and confessions from his former teammates.

    “The proof gathered by USADA was essentially the result of investigations and testimony of former teammates of Armstrong but the cooperation between different agencies was also useful – the AFLD was able to pass on documentation in its possession as well as the results of analyses of Armstrong’s urine,” Genevois said.

    While Genevois acknowledged that the fight against doping has progressed beyond the analysis of blood and urine samples, he warned that whistleblowers should be afforded reduced suspensions rather than outright immunity in return for testimony.

    “In my opinion, an accusation shouldn’t lead the impunity of the accuser but only to a reduction of the penalty. The denunciation must come early on in the process. It ought not to be someone at the end of his career getting off too lightly by making a denunciation.”

    Genevois also hinted that the AFLD was progressing with its bid to establish a test for Aicar, which burns fat and improves endurance but is currently undetectable.

    “It’s encouraging,” he said. “We still have to wait for fine-tuning of the detection before the test is validated by WADA. Our strategy is not to speak too quickly or too soon. That can lead to changes in behaviour and lead some people to get off too lightly. We can also keep samples for eight years and that forms part of the dissuasion. I believe that pressure is mounting on cheats.”

     

     

     

  • More to cycling than the Tour de France, says Madiot

    Marc Madiot is a proponent of radio-free racing
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 13:34
    By:
    Cycling News

    FDJ manager on Change Cycling Now and MPCC

    FDJ manager Marc Madiot has insisted that his two young sprinters Nacer Bouhanni and Arnaud Démare can co-exist on the same team in 2013, stating that there is more to cycling than the Tour de France.

    Bouhanni beat Démare into second place at the French national championships last June while Démare scored a fine victory at the Vattenfall Cyclassics. Neither rider has yet lined up at the Tour, although Démare made his grand tour debut at the Giro d’Italia and Bouhanni rode the Vuelta a España.

    Asked by sudouest.fr if Bouhanni or Démare would be his sprinter for the 2013 Tour, Madiot said: “It annoys me when everyone asks me that! The two will have room to express themselves. The Germans, with Kittel and Degenkolb, or the Belgians, with Boonen and Cavendish, don’t ask themselves these questions. We won’t focus just on the Tour. There are races all year round, some nice ones, with WorldTour points to be scored – at the Tour Down Under in January, at the Dauphiné, in China, everywhere!”

    A high proportion of French riders have traditionally built their seasons around earning selection for the Tour de France, but in the WorldTour era, Madiot seems keen to change the culture at FDJ.

    “I’ve told my riders that I don’t want to hear them saying anymore, ‘this guy’s doing the Tour, this guy isn’t,’” Madiot said. “There’s more than the Tour in the season. There is one leader assured of doing it today and that’s Thibaut Pinot. I want us to escape this tendonitis of French cycling, which sees only the Tour.”

    Change Cycling Now

    In a wide-ranging interview, Madiot was also asked for his opinion of the Change Cycling Now movement, which met in London in December and has floated the idea of nominating Greg LeMond as an interim president of the UCI.

    “I have a lot of time for LeMond, I rode with him. His move doesn’t bother me,” Madiot said. “I have more of a problem with this Australian sponsor (Jamie Fuller, CEO of a sportswear company) who has come to make publicity for himself and attack the UCI in the courts. It’s ok that you want to advance things, but in that case, why go and claim €2 million in damages?”

    Madiot also wondered if Change Cycling Now’s approach needed to be more nuanced and he suggested that the group should initially serve as a something of a watchdog rather than seeking to effect change directly.

    “In my opinion, they’re not going about the thing the right way,” he said. “They’re saying that Pat McQuaid and Hein Verbruggen are bastards and that’s all well and good, but apart from that? There is nothing productive and that’s a pity. They want the presidency of the UCI but they’re not even in a position to be able to get themselves elected… I’d like them to be a proposing force, [I’d like] that they would say to the UCI, ‘why don’t you do this or that?’ And then afterwards, we could see.”

    Madiot’s FDJ team was one of the founder members of another movement aimed at cleaning up cycling, the MPCC, or Movement for Credible Cycling. Largely the preserve of French teams since its inception in 2007, the group – which imposes stricter controls on the use of corticoids – has received an influx of new membership requests in the wake of the Lance Armstrong affair, including from Astana and Gianni Savio’s Androni-Venezuela outfit.

    “If he respects our rules, then he is welcome,” Madiot said of Savio. Asked if Bjarne Riis and Saxo-Tinkoff  would also be welcomed into MPCC, Madiot said: “There will be time to talk about it. But for now, he hasn’t sent us anything…”

     

     

  • Garmin-Sharp finalizes 2013 roster

    Probably the only bright spot for Garmin-Sharp on stage 6 was David Zabriskie claiming the most combative rider award.
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 18:56
    By:
    Cycling News

    Banned riders returning to team in March

    The Garmin-Sharp team named its 29-man roster for the WorldTour squad for 2013, clarifying that the three riders banned for testifying to the US Anti-Doping Agency against Lance Armstrong in its doping investigation – Tom Danielson, Christian Vande Velde and David Zabriskie – will return to the team when their six-month suspensions end in March.

    Danielson, Vande Velde and Zabriskie all confessed to doping during their years with the US Postal Service team, but all claim to have quit doping by 2006 and were given reduced suspensions for their cooperation with the anti-doping authorities.

    New to the team for 2013 are young riders Rohan Dennis, Lachlan Morton and Steele Von Hoff from Australia, and returning to the team after stints with HTC-Columbia and Spidertech is Caleb Fairly.

    The team will rally around Giro d’Italia champion Ryder Hesjedal, who heads up the returning coterie of veterans. The Canadian was recently honoured as sportsman of the year in his country, and gave the American team its first Grand Tour victory this year.

    Belgian Nick Nuyens has joined the team to bolster its Classics squad. The 2011 Tour of Flanders winner will fill in for outgoing rider Sep Vanmarcke, and join Paris-Roubaix winner Jonan Vansummeren, Andreas Klier and Martijn Maaskant in the team.

    Tyler Farrar remains the team’s main fast man, having lost Heinrich Haussler to the nascent IAM Cycling project. Andrew Talansky and Dan Martin will complement Hesjedal in the stage race squad.

    "Our roster has an outstanding mix of new and returning riders, but with a focus on the next generation of riders," said team manager Jonathan Vaughters. "Slipstream’s roots are in developing young talent and with additions like Rohan Dennis, Lachlan Morton and the return of Caleb Fairly, we’re poised to continue that tradition and fortify the future of cycling.”

    2013 Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda Roster
    Jack Bauer
    Tom Danielson
    Thomas Dekker
    Rohan Dennis
    Caleb Fairly
    Tyler Farrar
    Koldo Fernandez de Larrea
    Nathan Haas
    Ryder Hesjedal
    Alex Howes
    Robbie Hunter
    Andreas Klier
    Michel Kreder
    Raymond Kreder
    Martijn Maaskant
    Dan Martin
    David Millar
    Lachlan Morton
    Ramunas Navardauskas
    Nick Nuyens
    Jacob Rathe
    Sebastien Rosseler
    Peter Stetina
    Andrew Talansky
    Christian Vande Velde
    Johan Vansummeren
    Steele VonHoff
    Fabian Wegmann
    David Zabriskie

  • Julian Dean to retire in January

    Kiwi Julian Dean expected to figure in the results of a bunch sprint.
    Article published:
    December 28, 2012, 21:33
    By:
    Cycling News

    Orica GreenEdge rider to quit after New Zealand championships

    38-year-old Julian Dean has announced his imminent retirement. The Orica GreenEdge sprinter will compete in the New Zealand national championships in Christchurch on January 13 as the last race of his 17-year career. He will transition to team management for the WorldTour squad following the event.

    Dean’s career has been cut short by injury – a broken leg sustained in the Volta Ciclista a Catalunya in his first ride back from a broken shoulder led to the decision to call an end to his time as a professional cyclist.

    “It is not the way I had envisaged finishing my career. I thought hard about another season. Green Edge were great to offer me another chance to ride but it is the right time, and the team has an opportunity to begin a new career in team management,” Dean said in a press release.

    “Orica GreenEDGE was fortunate to have the experience of Julian for his final competitive year in what has been an outstanding career,” said Orica GreenEdge manager Shayne Bannan.

    “In 2013 Julian will have a role in the Team as a Assistant Sport Director-Mentor. We are excited that Julian has accepted this role and believe that he will provide another level of professionalism to the way that we can service riders in the Orica GreenEDGE Team.”

    Dean has competed in 20 Grand Tours throughout his career, which started in the US with Mercury in 1998 and included stints with US Postal, CSC, Crédit Agricole and Garmin before his time with GreenEdge. He denied having any knowledge of the doping culture that was underway at the US Postal team at the time.

    He competed in four Olympics and one Commonwealth Games, winning a medal on the track in the team pursuit in Victoria in 1994.

    The highlight of Dean’s career was a stage win in the 2011 Tour de France and a stage win in 2008 Giro d’Italia.

    He will compete in the Sun Tour before heading into the sunset in his home country’s championships.

  • Astana suspends Kashechkin for not signing code of conduct

    Andrey Kashechkin (Astana)
    Article published:
    December 29, 2012, 09:05
    By:
    Cycling News

    Kazakhstani team applies to join MPCC

    Team Astana is trying to clean up its image for 2013, suspending Andrey Kashechkin for failure to sign the team's internal rules, and formally applying for membership in the Movement for a Credible Cycling.

    The team announced Friday that it was provisionally suspending Kashechkin, “effective immediately, for failure to agree to the squad's internal regulations. The Kazakhstan rider remains on the 2013 team roster, but can not be included in race calendar submissions until his signature is received on Pro Team Astana's internal Code of Conduct.”

    Kashechkin served a two-year suspension for blood doping, returning to racing in June 2010.

    Astana has also applied to join the MPCC, the Mouvement Pour un Cyclisme Crédible “as stakeholders in professional cycling and in full recognition of the importance in demonstrating publicly our determination to prevent doping.”

    The team admitted that "Past practices in cycling have put “the reputation, image and viability of the sport at serious risk. Neither the doping practices nor the environment that served to enable them can ever be allowed to happen again.”

    The team said that the MPCC's Code of Conduct is “ a credible, voluntary step towards protecting and reestablishing the positive, clean image of professional cycling.

    “We share the MPCC's belief that riders, managers and sponsors in professional cycling have the obligation and capacity to say no to doping, and call on the UCI to recognize the MPCC as a viable intermediary among teams, organizers and Cycling Federations.”

    The Astana team has a checkered past, with several doping cases in recent years. Alberto Contador was with Astana when he tested positive for Clenbuterol during the 2010 Tour de France. Both Kashechkin and team principal  Alexander Vinokourov were suspended for blood doping, while Lance Armstrong and Johan Bruyneel, both named by the USADA, were with the team in 2009.