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First Edition Cycling News, June 11, 2008

Date published:
June 11, 2008, 1:00 BST
  • Willo's wrist ends his Beauce

    Trent Wilson (Jittery Joe’s) with a broken wrist
    Article published:
    June 11, 2008, 0:00 BST
    By:
    Mark Zalewski in Lac-Etchemin, Québec, Canada

    By Mark Zalewski in Lac-Etchemin, Québec, Canada Jittery Joes' general classification rider and...

    By Mark Zalewski in Lac-Etchemin, Québec, Canada

    Jittery Joes' general classification rider and Cyclingnews diarist Trent Wilson started the first stage of the Tour de Beauce with a bang, launching a daring attack inside the opening kilometres of the 167km stage. But the rationale behind his attack was to be his undoing today. A broken wrist suffered in the first race of Philly week, the Lehigh Valley Classic, put him out for the rest of the week. But the doctors molded the cast around his handlebars, hoping that he could race in his season's targeted race, the Tour de Beauce.

    "My wrist hurt and I felt I could pick my lines better if I went up the road," Wilson told Cyclingnews about his rationale for attacking so early. "I thought that if the bunch would give me eight minutes I could stay up the road, get a couple of KOMs and the jersey, then finish and start the race in [the jersey] tomorrow. But I only got five minutes and when they got me back the wrist was done."

    As part of his process for adapting his riding style to his injury, Wilson had the team mechanic switch his brake levers from the "Aussie-style" of braking, or the right lever controlling the front brake, to what he referred to as the American or "Sepo-style" of brake controls with the left lever controlling the front brake. [Ed. - It is not appropriate to translate the Aussie slang here, but feel free to look it up]. He even had a reminder message taped to his handlebars in case he forgot on the road.

    Once the pack reeled in the solo Aussie, Wilson knew his race was done. He will spend the rest of the week here in Beauce supporting his team-mates from the team car before returning to his American home in Nashville, Tennessee to reevaluate his season's goals.

    (Additional research and assistance...

  • Cervélo-Lifeforce signs Ryan

    Carla Ryan
    Article published:
    June 11, 2008, 0:00 BST
    By:
    Ben Atkins

    By Ben Atkins Former Australian Time Trial Champion Carla Ryan has joined the Cervélo-Lifeforce Pro...

    By Ben Atkins

    Former Australian Time Trial Champion Carla Ryan has joined the Cervélo-Lifeforce Pro Cycling Team. The 22 year-old from Brisbane has impressed this year in stage races, winning the Under-23 jersey at the Tour of New Zealand and riding strongly in the Tour de l'Aude. Her first race for her new team will be the six day Grand Boucle Féminine International, starting in Gent, Belgium next week.

    Ryan's main talents lie in her climbing and longer distance time trialling, something that her new Cervélo-Lifeforce team-mates specialise in meaning that the young Australian should fit in well.

    "We are happy that Carla is joining our team," said Thomas Campana, Cervélo-Lifeforce Team Manager. "I'm convinced that she is a great enrichment for all of us and that she can make also a good personal development in the professional business together with us."

  • Monfort on a Tour mission at Dauphiné

    Maxime Monfort (Cofidis)
    Article published:
    June 11, 2008, 0:00 BST
    By:
    Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France

    By Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France Maxime Monfort (Cofidis) showed great form at the...

    By Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France

    Maxime Monfort (Cofidis) showed great form at the beginning of the Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré. Showing off his improved time trialing ability, the rider finished fourth in the prologue behind Levi Leipheimer (Astana), Thor Hushovd (Crédit Agricole), and Alejandro Valverde (Caisse d'Epargne).

    "This result increases my motivation for Wednesday's time trial," said the Belgian. "I'm not at 100 percent of my capacities yet, but I'll target a top 10 finish."

    Monfort has been trialing a new position for time trialing that really suits him. "Now I focus on time trials and I enjoy it, I know how important it is for stage races," he said.

    Monfort assessed what his specialty is during his first year as a professional with Landbouwkrediet. While at the squad he claimed victory at the Tour of Luxembourg in his first professional season and has since moved to French ProTour outfit Cofidis.

    "Stage races are what I'm the best at," said Monfort, who finished 11th at the Vuelta a España last year.

    The rider had his eye on contesting last year's Tour de France, but wasn't on Cofidis' roster for the French Grand Tour. While disappointed at first, the decision meant he avoided the drama that followed, with the whole team pulling out of the race after a positive test from Cristian Moreni.

    For Monfort, who is one of the leaders of the young generation against drugs use, it would have been a difficult situation to be forced to go home because of somebody else.

    "I was very disappointed to be left out of the Tour team, but everything is fine now," he explained. "My start is guaranteed this year. I'm looking forward to my first participation to the Tour de France.

    "I know I'll have to take the initiative and secure some advance to the big leaders before the mountains," he added. "I'll have to profit from the stages with...

  • Suisse rejects Boonen, Tour to follow?

    Tom Boonen's Audi parked out the front of his parents' house yesterday.
    Article published:
    June 11, 2008, 0:00 BST
    By:
    Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France

    By Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France Tom Boonen (Quick Step) will not be allowed to start the...

    By Jean-François Quénet in Vienne, France

    Tom Boonen (Quick Step) will not be allowed to start the Tour de Suisse, race organisers announced Tuesday. The decision follows the Belgian sprinter's positive anti-doping control for cocaine on May 25 and could see the entire team thrown out of the Suisse event, in addition to placing a question mark over Boonen's Tour de France start.

    "We want to make a point and emphasise that we will not put up with any rider who behaves that way," Tour director Armin Meier said. "It doesn't matter to us whether it is a world star or any other rider."

    The Suisse race organiser also asked the management of the Belgian Quick Step team for its position on Boonen's situation. It requested an answer by noon, Thursday, which is also the deadline for the teams to submit their final line-ups. If the team does not comply with that request, the Tour organisers said that they could decide to exclude the entire team from the race.

    Boonen will not be suspended by the UCI for his positive cocaine test. The use of cocaine outside of competition does not carry a sanction and as the test was carried out two days before a race, Boonen has escaped a sanction according to the UCI.

    "The UCI will not ask for a disciplinary procedure to be opened," a spokesperson for the UCI explained to Sport Wereld. "The rule for the UCI is the same as that of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA). There is no sanction for cocaine when talking about an out of competition control."

    The deadline for a control outside competition to be handled is one day for an ordinary race and three days before a major Tour such as the Tour, Giro d'Italia and Vuelta a España.

    The Belgian Cycling Federation confirmed that they would also not be sanctioning Boonen for the altercation. "That's what the rules state," said President Laurent De Backer to Sporza.

    The Boonen issue puts Tour de...