TechPowered By

More tech

First Edition Cycling News for November 11, 2005

Date published:
November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
  • Announcing the Giro di Brisbane

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    In the spirit of Australian multiculturalism, Cycling Queensland has announced the inaugural Giro di...

    In the spirit of Australian multiculturalism, Cycling Queensland has announced the inaugural Giro di Brisbane criterium on Sunday, November 13. The one hour race will form part of the Italy 2005 Festival in the northern Australian city, with a top quality field competing for a prize purse of $18,500, including a $7,500 Battaglin bicycle.

    "The three kilometre course is a technically challenging ride, but with 85 high calibre cyclists taking part I am expecting it to be fiercely contested," said Wendy Sanders, CEO of Cycling Queensland. "Those people who have only ever watched a race on TV will be pleasantly surprised at how exciting races are in real-life - the atmosphere will be electric. Not only will this race help to promote and extend the appreciation of cycling, but it will also help to put Queensland on the map for major sporting events.

    One of the favourites is New Zealand-born Jaaron Poad, who is in top form following his win at the Noosa Criterium last weekend. "It would be a very satisfying win especially considering that riders are coming from all over the place to contest it," said Poad, who is currently racing in New Zealand. "I'm hoping to lead from the front and keep the pace fast in order to steer clear of any accidents."

    World Champion team pursuit rider Ashley Hutchinson will also contest the Giro di Brisbane. Hutchinson has just returned from Moscow, where he was a member of the gold medal teams pursuit team at the World Cup. The Brisbane based rider is also strong on the road, winning several stages of the Tour of Queensland over the last two years.

    Several women, including Hannah Banks, a member of the Australian Institute of Sport road squad, are also expected to challenge the pace.

    Adding even more serious horse power will be a parade of Ferrari, Maserati and Lamborghini cars - and Scootopia scooters for the more fuel conscious - which will start the race at 3:40pm with a lap of honour.

    The...

  • Tickets on sale for Tasmanian Christmas Carnivals

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    The Sports Carnivals Association of Tasmania (SCAT) has announced the availability of series tickets...

    The Sports Carnivals Association of Tasmania (SCAT) has announced the availability of series tickets for the Tasmanian Christmas Carnivals at www.tascarnivals.com. Tickets cost $15 per adult per carnival, $42 for four carnivals, or $52.50 for all five carnivals. The series will be officially launched by the Minister for Sport and Recreation at the Country Club Casino in Launceston next Wednesday, November 16 at 11.00am.

    The popular track series has already signed a number of local and international riders, including German Christian Lademann, Americans Jame Carney, Bobby Lea, Mike Friedman, Josh Kerkhoff and Elliott Gaunt, Canadians Jenny Trew and Chris Reid, Scotsmen Evan Oliphant, James McCallum, Kate Cullen, and Katrina Hair, Isle of Man cyclist Mark Kelly, and Australians Jessie McClean, Tiffany Cromwell, and Belinda Goss.

    SCAT is also looking for people who might be able to assist with billeting interstate and international athletes or cyclists. Those interested can contact cycling coordinator Scott Callow at s.callow1@bigpond.com or SCAT president Grant Atkins at GrantA@latrobe.tas.gov.au.

    For more information see: www.tascarnivals.com.

  • Davis Phinney Foundation presents $125,000 cheque

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    The Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson's Disease Research and Wellness presented a $125,000...

    The Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson's Disease Research and Wellness presented a $125,000 cheque to the Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and University Hospital on Wednesday. The donation, presented by Phinney himself, is earmarked for the Davis Phinney-Donald Krumme Fund at the UC College of Medicine, which supports research into the causes of and treatments for Parkinson's disease. The funds were raised from Sunflower Revolution II, a gala, educational symposium, and bike ride held in Cincinnati last August. The 2006 Sunflower Revolution is scheduled for October 13-15.

    The Neuroscience Institute plans to use the Davis Phinney Foundation gift to fund laboratory research, clinical trials involving patients with Parkinson's disease, and fellowship opportunities for young physicians training to become Parkinson's specialists.

    "In these times of ever diminishing federal funding for biomedical research, this generous grant from the Davis Phinney Foundation will enable scientists at UC to lead the advances in deciphering the underlying causes and discovering potential cures for this devastating movement disorder," said Kim Seroogy, Ph.D., professor of neurology and director of the Selma Schottenstein Laboratory for Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    Fredy J. Revilla, M.D., who heads the Center for Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders at The Neuroscience Institute, thanked Phinney "for taking the lead and showing us a unique path in the race to find a cure."

    Phinney, who in 1986 became the first American to win a stage of the Tour de France, was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's at age 40. He assumed the role of Parkinson's advocate with the formation of his foundation in 2004.

  • Trust House Cycle Classic kicks off in January

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    The final race route and dates for New Zealand's Trust House Cycle Classic (Tour of Wellington) have...

    The final race route and dates for New Zealand's Trust House Cycle Classic (Tour of Wellington) have been released. Commencing on January 25, 2006, the UCI 2.2 ranked stage race is the second on the Oceania Continental Tour, following the Jacob's Creek Tour Down Under. It's expected to attract a number of riders looking to hone their form for the Commonwealth Games in Australia in mid-March.

    2006 marks the 19th edition of the race, which is run around Wellington, on New Zealand's North Island. It will be held over seven stages, including three criteriums, one individual time trial, and three road stages. Both the Hutt City and Masterton Criteriums will commence at 6.00pm in order to attract the public.

    The stages

    Stage 1 - January 25: Hutt City Criterium, 45 km
    Stage 2 - January 26: Featherson to Masterton, 94.4km
    Stage 3 - January 26: Masterton Criterium, 40 km
    Stage 4 - January 27: Masterton - Pahiatua, 158.5km
    Stage 5 - January 28: Masterton Circuit - Finish Top Admiral Hill, 125.3km
    Stage 6 - January 29: Scorching Bay ITT, 12 km
    Stage 7 - January 29: Petone Criterium, 40 km

  • Borghesi to OTC Doors - Lauretana

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    Italian second year pro Fabio Borghesi (Team Miche) is the ninth signing for new continental...

    Italian second year pro Fabio Borghesi (Team Miche) is the ninth signing for new continental professional team OTC Doors - Lauretana. The 25 year-old Borghesi from Umbria is the third rider to follow the same path as Jamie Burrow and Roman Luhovyy in re-joining team manager Giovanni Baldini with whom he achieved numerous wins and a "maglia azzurra" (Zolder 2002) before turning professional in 2004.

  • An interview with Scott Sunderland

    Scott Sunderland
    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    During the course of 2005, Scott Sunderland has transformed himself from an experienced professional...

    Part I: The transition, director vs. rider, and highlights

    During the course of 2005, Scott Sunderland has transformed himself from an experienced professional cyclist to a hard working directeur sportif with one of the top teams in the world: Team CSC. The always approachable Australian discussed his first season with Cyclingnews' Chief Online Editor Jeff Jones in this two part interview.

    After retiring as a professional cyclist at the end of 2004, Scott Sunderland did not wait long before taking up his next challenge. An offer to join Team CSC as a sports director was too good to pass up, and Scott found himself exchanging his bike for a position behind the wheel of a team car. It's a natural choice for a number of ex-riders, and nearly all the best directors and team managers have been professionals themselves. The difference is that instead of being looked after by the team staff, you are the person doing the looking after. The number of daily tasks is multiplied, along with the responsibility. And there's only one way to learn it: do it.

    Cyclingnews spoke to Scott Sunderland over a few beers in a smoky cafe in Gent, after another long day near the end of the 2005 season. The Belgian-based Aussie reflected on his first year in the driver's seat of one of Team CSC's black and red Škodas. It was, as he expected, quite a learning experience.

    "I think I had a bit of an idea of what had to be done," he said of his expectations. "I had an idea of what I was going to be capable of doing, but what sticks in my mind is that last year in December, Bjarne [Riis, CSC team manager] said 'Look, in your first year in as a team director, you just take it easy.' So I thought, 'OK, this is great'. At the first training camp, the vibe was good. The second training camp, I already had to do more than the first one. Went in the first race; we won that [GP...

  • Riders against half-stages in Giro

    Article published:
    November 11, 2005, 0:00 GMT
    By:
    Jeff Jones, Bikeradar.com

    With the announcement of the 2006 route of the Giro d'Italia to be made on Saturday, news has...

    With the announcement of the 2006 route of the Giro d'Italia to be made on Saturday, news has apparently leaked out that there will be two stages on the final day: a mountain time trial in Varese and the finishing stage from Varese to Milan. Although unconfirmed, the Italian Professional Riders' Association (ACCPI) has already reacted to this possible scenario, taking a firm stance against it.

    "We perfectly agree with the rules of the Union Cycliste Internationale forbidding half-stages in grand tours, especially in the last days of a race like the Giro d'Italia, at the end of a tough week," said the ACCPI's president Amedeo Colombo. "It is a serious matter that such a hypothesis hasn't been submitted to the opinion of the different exponents of cycling, first of all the riders. For the nth time we have to claim more consideration. In any case, we believe they could change their mind, considering the negative judgment already expressed by UCI and the position that we have taken up."

    The organisation's secretary Gianni Bugno added, "We refer to the international rules shared by everybody, first of all athletes and organisations. If riders are urged to respect rules, organisations will have to do the same thing. We are surprised that this idea comes from RCS Sport that has professed to be in the front line for a more "human" cycling for a long time. This would be a Giro for supermen: four stages in Belgium, two so-called "rest days", that will be dedicated to as many demanding transfers, and this last invention of closing half-stages with the mountain time trial. I think that all is in contrast with the aspiration of cycling without excesses."

    Belgian start

    It's already known that the 2006 Giro will start on May 6 in Wallonia, Belgium, with a 6 km prologue time trial in Seraing. The first four days will also be run in this part of Belgium, where some 200,000 Italians live. Stage 1 will be from Mons-Charleroi to Marcinelle (in...