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Scott Sunderland

Photo: © Sabine Sunderland

Diary Entries

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 28, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:11 BST

"It is not your aptitude, but your attitude, that determines your altitude." — Scott Sunderland,...

Photo: © Sabine Sunderland

Diary Entries

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 28, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:11 BST

"It is not your aptitude, but your attitude, that determines your altitude." — Scott Sunderland,...

Photo: © Sabine Sunderland

Diary Entries

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 28, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:11 BST

"It is not your aptitude, but your attitude, that determines your altitude." — Scott Sunderland,...

Photo: © Sabine Sunderland

Diary Entries

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 28, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:12 BST

"It is not your aptitude, but your attitude, that determines your altitude." — Scott Sunderland,...

Ivan Basso and Gilbero Simoni

Long days, but good days

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 28, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:12 BST

Index of 2006 updates Italy, Saturday, May 27, 2006 Stage 17 - Wednesday, May 24: Termeno/Tramin -...

Index of 2006 updates

Italy, Saturday, May 27, 2006

Stage 17 - Wednesday, May 24: Termeno/Tramin - Furkel Pass, 121 km

That was going to be one of the biggest days of the whole Giro, but in fact, the weather changed the plans. The mountain pass in the middle was cancelled, and we went around through the valley. Then the last five kilometres of Kronplatz were cancelled too. The cold temperatures made it a survival day more than anything else, without changes to the GC. From our point of view, well, Piepoli won the stage, that was OK. Ivan was second, and picked up a bit of extra time on Gutierrez and the others on the GC, so that was good too.

Stage 18 - Thursday, May 25: Sillian - Gemona Del Friuli, 210 km

This was a long day for our team. They constantly had to ride tempo - not do too much, but do enough to keep the break at a reasonable limit, and keep some of the other teams interested in chasing it down. Just more or less controlling it. On such a day, with steep climbs, it zapped the legs, probably one of the toughest days on our boys. Nicki Sorensen was sick, and couldn't do much because of a chest infection. He had been on antibiotics for three days, and suffered in silence, gritting his teeth to come through. But he was able to bite the bullet, after that he was able to do a lot of work for the team again, like today. I don't know too many people who can get sick in the third week and come through like that. I think the Viking came out in him. Both him and Michael Blaudzun have done an enormous amount of work here from day one. They were really the foot soldiers of the team.

Stage 19 - Friday, May 26: Pordenone - Passo Di San Pellegrino (Dolomiti Stars), 224 km; 240 km in total on the bike if you include the neutral zone

It was a long day, over seven hours. The tactics were to get two guys in the break if there were more than ten riders up there: either Jens, Nicki or Bobby. We ended up with Jens and Bobby in the front. The tactics went well, and we didn't have to do much chasing behind. We could just ride our own tempo, no-one else's. Panaria and Bettini put the hammer down in front, then Saunier started to ride to get it back before the finish, but they left their run a bit too late.

Jens had a super day. Again. The German tank was back at it, getting stronger and stronger. If needed Jens could wait for Basso to come across and act as a springplank But it was quite calm and there was no need for Jens nor Bobby to drop back. Jens was given the OK to go for the victory. But he made his own decision, which was totally backed by the team. What Jens did was great! It was a big sign of sportsmanship you don't see too often any more. This is just Jens Voigt. He's a hell of a nice guy, and has certain morals and rules that he lives by.

Stage 20 - Saturday, May 27: Trento - Aprica, 211 km

Today was the last of the big mountain days. Probably for a lot of people, it was one too many. Even yesterday was one too many for some. Today was very, very heavy, and it was such a long day. The boys were out there for 7 hours; some of them finished at 6:15pm having started at 10:45.

There's going to be quite a few tired riders tomorrow, don't know if those will actually be enjoying the ride into Milan for the finish.

For us today couldn't have finished better. For Ivan, it would have been great to take the victory yesterday already, with the birth of his son Santiago. His mind was a bit preoccupied. Today Ivan was more focused. He came down to breakfast ready for battle. Basso showed who was the best today; he is in the form of his life.

The rest of the team has done excellent work. To have two days like this at the end of a three week race is tough. But our team held it together, kept focus and kept on going.

Everybody, from the soigneurs, the mechanics, all the staff are struggling to get 5-6 hours sleep at night for the last week. Putting compact cranks on, taking them off, late arrivals to the hotels, late massages, late dinners. It's been a huge effort form everybody. They'll be very happy to be in Milan tomorrow for the victory, and happy to get a couple of days rest as well!

Ciao,
Scott

Results

Stage 17
Stage 18
Stage 19
Stage 20

Ivan Basso glides through

Cut and dried

By:
Cycling News
Published:
May 23, 2006, 1:00 BST,
Updated:
April 22, 2009, 20:12 BST

Index of 2006 updates Italy, Tuesday, May 23, 2006 It was a welcome day for the team yesterday that...

Index of 2006 updates

Italy, Tuesday, May 23, 2006

It was a welcome day for the team yesterday that the three sprinters' teams were willing to do all the work in the stage. That allowed us to sit a little bit quiet in the bunch. It was still a long day yesterday, especially on the back of the couple of big mountain days. We did see that everyone had recuperated well though.

There's not a hell of a lot to say about today: it was pretty cut and dried. We were lucky with the weather. It stayed dry until just after the finish, then there was a lot of wind and rain, and it got really nasty.

It was calm at the beginning, and I think everyone was a bit daunted by the coming stages. I think it was 40 km before the first attack went, then the boys got on the front and started riding a nice little tempo. Sometimes a Saunier Duval rider was up there, and that is what we more or less expected. At the team meeting in the morning, Bjarne Riis said that Simoni would try to win this stage, as he's from the area and he needed to start his assault on a podium place.

As it turned out, that's more or less how it went. The boys did a fantastic job to the bottom of the climb, then kept the tempo up. Simoni and Piepoli were aggressive. They wanted to make the race hard, we knew it beforehand. Then when we saw Cunego and Savoldelli lose contact, for Simoni that was the signal to give full gas, which he did do. Ivan needed to wait a bit and see what was happening, then it was time to go. He went on, by himself, and was very strong at the finish. He was very calm and alert. And he went onto the victory. This is a definite confidence booster to himself and the team.

For Simoni, he knew if he could come to the finish with Ivan, he stood a good chance of beating him, because he's a bit more explosive. But he has to get there first. This morning, Bjarne said Simoni would be going for the victory, and if Ivan comes to the finish with Simoni, it's probably not going to happen. But Ivan needs to take time on the other riders. If he succeeds in doing that, he'll be alone, and he'll win anyway.

Ivan did what he had to do. Now he looks very secure, and it's looking very positive for the coming days.

The team is strong too. They're going well - a couple of guys are tiring a bit, but it's the end of a three week tour. Some have been on the front since the prologue. But they've all got good motivation, good morale, and can see Milan in sight.

It's another difficult day tomorrow, then a bit of a lesser day: long but not too bad, with a few climbs in the middle. Then we go into Friday and Saturday, which are two mega days.

At the moment now, Ivan just has to defend. That's how you win. It is a three week stage race, and he's been good until now. Everything has been calculated, and the planning and the tactics have been thought and talked about over three weeks, not just a couple of days, with special attention to key stages.

From the prologue, some people said CSC were not ready for it, but it's not a one week race. You need to be able to be there at certain points of the race, reach certain goals, e.g. in the team time trial, individual time trial, and the mountain stages. The team has been able to help Ivan reach those. For the rest, it's just to take an advantage, and then control it.

You've also got to remember that there's a few riders who've dropped away which we didn't expect: Savoldelli and Cunego for example. Then, on the other hand, you've got Gutierrez, who has been very consistent.

Overall, Ivan's professionalism and his dedication to training and racing is something I have seen in very few other riders. He's very secure at home, there's no show about him either. He was offered a pink helmet the other day, and he said, 'No, that's not me.' I think everybody will start to get to know the real Ivan Basso more in the near future.

Ciao,
Scott

Results

Stage 15
Stage 16

Author
Scott Sunderland

"It is not your aptitude, but your attitude, that determines your altitude." — Scott Sunderland, 2005 Diary entries Profile Biography Gallery Palmares Email There's a term for people who embody the qualities of honesty, determination and hard work that Australians admire most: True Blue. To be a true blue Aussie it also doesn't hurt if you've had to struggle against the odds, and especially against unreasonable odds. His friends call him 'True Blue' and if any of the crop of Australian pros who made a living in Europe in the 1990s and early part of the 21st century deserve to be hailed this way, Cyclingnews diarist Scott Sunderland surely does. Born: Lives: Team: Height: Weight: Club: 1973: 1982: 1984: 1986: 1987: 1990: 1991: 1994 1996: 1998: 1999: 2001: 2004: 1986: 1991: 1992: 1993: 1999: 2000: Australia UK USA